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Full text of "Evening Undergraduate and Graduate Courses, 1969-1973"

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lONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

UPPER MONTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY 



EVENING DIVISION 




Partridge Hall 




u«te S- Kiide/ig/taduate 
19B9-1370 



EVENING DIVISION CALENDAR 1969-1970 



ZJ- all -Semester lytjy C/aJJ Schedule 



September 15 and 16 

Registration with late registration through 

September 20. iVIail registration will pre- 
cede these dates. 
September 18 

Classes Begin. 
October 15 and 18 

Comprehensive Examinations. (See page 

13). 
October 22 

End of first third of semester. 
November 15 

Midpoint of semester. 
November 14 

Last day to file for June M.A. Degree 

Conferment. 
November 24 through 29 

Thanksgiving Recess. 
December 21 through January 4 

Christmas Vacation. 
January 5 

Classes Resume. 
January 24 

Last Day of Classes-Fail Semester. 



Mondays 
September 22, 29— October 6, 13, 20, 27— 
November 3, 10, 17 — December 1, 8, 15— 
January 5, 12, 19. 

Tuesdays 

September 23, 30— October 7, 14, 21, 28— 
November 4, 11, 18 — December 2, 9, 16 — 
January 6, 13, 20. 

Wednesdays 

September 24— October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29— 
November 5, 12, 19— December 3, 10, 17 — 
January 7, 14, 21. 

Thursdays 

September 18, 25— October 2, 9, 16, 23, 
30— November 13, 20— December 4, 11, 
18— January 8, 15, 22. 

Saturdays 

September 20, 27— October 4, 11, 18, 25— 
November 1, 15, 22— December 6, 13, 20— 
January 10, 17, 24. 



Opting, ^emedter Vy /\J i^iadd ^clteduie 



January 26 and 27 


Mondays 






Registration with late registration through 
January 31. Mail registration will precede 
these dates. 

February 2 

Classes Begin 


February 2, 9, 16, 23— March 2, 
April 6, 13, 20, 27— May 4, 11 

Tuesdays 

February 3, 10, 17, 24— March 3 
31— April 7, 14, 21, 28— May 5, 


9, 
18 

, 10 
12, 


16— 
25. 

, 17, 
19. 


March 7 


Wednesdays 






End of first third of semester 
March 11 and 14 


February 4, 11, 18, 25— March 4, 
April 1, 8, 15, 22, 29— May 6, 13, 


11, 
20. 


18— 


Comprehensive Examinations. (See page 
13). 

March 14 


Thursdays 

February 5, 12, 19, 26— March 5, 
April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30— May 7, 14, 


12, 
21. 


19— 


Last day to file for August M.A. Degree 
Conferment. 

March 22 through March 30 


Saturdays 

February 7, 14, 21, 28— March 7, 
April 4, 11, 18, 25— May 2, 9, 16, 


14, 
23. 


21— 


Spring Recess 








March 31 








Classes Resume 








April 6 








Mid-point of the semester 








May 25 








Last Day of Classes— Spring Semester 








May 31 








Baccalaureate 








June 3 








Commencement 








June 29 








Last day to file for January 1971 M.A. 









Degree Conferment 

Notice: The program and requirements set forth in this bulletin are necessarily subject to change with- 
out notice at any time at the discretion of the administration. 



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Contents 
& Page 



ening Division 



Administration 

and 

Faculty 

4-9 



[ONTCLAIR 

PATE 

OLLEGE 



Upper Montclair 
New Jersey 



Undergraduate 

and Graduate 

Programs 

10-13 



Certification 

Information 

14-17 



Academic 

Regulations 

18-19 



General 

Information 

20-23 



Vail & Spring Semesters 



196S-1970 



Registration 

Information 

24-29 



Course 

Offerings 

33-88 



Fall 

and Spring 

Schedules 

89-109 



July 1969 
Mme 62 Number 3 



Parking 

and Traffic 

Regulations 

110 




Best Routes to 
Upper Montclair, New Jersey 




HOW TO GET TO MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 



Location 

Montclair State College is on Valley Road and Normal Avenue, Upper 
Montclair (Turn at the blinker) . The College is one mile south of the junction 
of Route 3 and 46 on Valley Road. 



Directions For Reaching the College 

From BloomReld Avenue, Montclair Center (Sear's store) proceed north 
on Valley Road — two miles to the Normal Avenue blinker. 

Heading East on Route 46, the landmark is West's Diner; take the next 
right, Valley Road — one mile to blinker at Normal Avenue. 

Heading West on Route 46, the landmark is the junction with Route 3. 
Turn on Valley Road to Montclair, bear right on clover-leaf and proceed south 
under Route 46 — one mile to the blinker at Normal Avenue. 

From the Turnpike Noith of Exit 10 or South of George Washington 
Biidge turn at Route 3 West or Route 46 West, than as above. From the 
Turnpike South of Exit 10, leave the Turnpike at Exit 10 and follow directions 
for Garden State Parkway North. 

Heading North on the Garden State Parkway, turn left at Exit 153B and 
proceed west on Route 3 to Valley Road. 

Heading South on the Garden State Parkway, turn at Route 46 West 
(Clifton Exit 154) thence to Valley Road. If you miss that turn, continue 
South to Exit 151, Watchung Avenue, thence west to Valley Road and North 
to light at Normal x^venue. 

The No. 60 PuhUc Service Bus from Newark to Montclair terminates at 
the Southwest end of the campus. 

The No. 76 Public Service Bus from Paterson to Orange stops at Valley 
Road and Normal Avenue. 

The No. 66 DeCanip Bus from New York, which leaves on the half hour 
from Platform 73, Port Authority Bus Terminal, stops at Valley Road and Mt. 
Hebron Road — one long block from the campus. 

The Erie Railroad, Montclair Heights Station, is at the Southwest corner of 
the campus. 



WHEN IN DOUBT 

Call 

746-9500— Area Code 201 




Montclair State College is fully accredited by the Middle States Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is also fully accredited by the National Council 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education with the Master's Degree as the highest degree 
approved. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

Dr. W. Lincoln Hawkins, Chairman 

Dr. Peter F. Drucker Mr. Bernard M. Hartnett, Jr. 

Dr. Henry Dyer Mr. Gerald A. LeBoff 

Dr. Edythe Jones Gaines Mrs. Katherine K. Neuberger 

Dr. Raymond W. Young Dean William C. Warren, Vice-chairman 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas H. Richardson, Ed.D President 

Allan Morehead, Ed.D Executive Vice-President and Provost 

Samson McDowell, Ph.D Acting Vice-President of the Division of Instruction 

Vincent B. Calabrese, M.Ed Vice President for Business and Financial Services 

Lawton W. Blanton, M.A Dean of Students 

Anthony R. Kuolt, M.Ed Associate Dean of the College 

Robert E. MacVane, M.Ed Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

Marshall A. Butler, M.A Associate Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

Maxine R. Bullard, B.A Assistant Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

Jerry T. Ice, M.A Assistant Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

M. Patricia Fries, M.A Evaluator and Certification Advisor 

Simone C. Picard, M.A Certification and M.A.T. Advisor 

Norman E. Lange, Ed.D Director of Student Teaching and Placement 

Peter P. Stapay, M.Ed Registrar 

John R. Beard, D.L.S Head Librarian 

4 Administration 



Richard J. Barker 
Joseph F. Becker 
Earl C. Davis 
L. Howard Fox 
Carl E. Frankson 
Katherine B. Hall 
Herbert J. Hauer 
Harry H. Hoitsma 
Leah K. Koditschek 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Charles H. Martens 
Matt Merfeld 
Dorothy Morse 
Louis C. Nanassy 
Earl K. Peckham 
James Pettegrove 
Bertha B. Quintana 
Ralph Walter 



Hazel Wacker 

John R. Beard, ex officio 

Robert E. Mac Vane, 
ex officio 

Allan Morehead, ex officio 

Simone C. Picard, ex officio 

Thomas H. Richardson, 
ex officio 

Maria Schantz, 
ex officio 



FACULTY 
Fall and Spring Semesters 1969-1970 

Thomas H. Richardson, Ed.D President 

Allan Morehead, Ed.D Executive Vice-Piesident and Piovost 

Robert E. Mac\'ane, M.Ed Diiectoi of Evening Division and Summer Session 

Huberta D. Alcaro, M.S Home Economics 

Hugh Allen, Jr., Ed.D Physics/Earth Science 

Man,- W. T. Amy, M.S Biolog\- 

Raymond J. Ast, M.S Diiectoi, Adult Education Center 

Haney L. Asterita, Ph.D Biology 

M. Jacqueline Baker, NLA Education 

William A. Ballare, M.A Speech 

Richard J. Barker, Ph.D History 

Peter G. Barnet, M.A Fine Arts 

Jeannine A. Barrett, M.A English 

Iralo Battista, M.A Foreign Languages 

Joseph F. Becker, Ed.D Chemistiy' 

Laurence Bellagamba, Ed.D Education 

Harold C. Bohn, Ed.D Chairman, Depaitment of English 

Bertrand P. Boucher, M.A Chairman, Department of Geography 

Daniel Brower, Ph.D Chairman, Depaitment of Psychology 

Martin Brown, Ed.D Ps\choJogy 

Joseph Brunner, M.A Education 

Edgar C. Bye, ALA Political Science 

Gerard L. Caracciola, M.A Speech 

Thomas F. Carroll, NLA Mathematics 

Anne C. Castens, Ed.D Education 

Winchung A. Chai, Ph.D Mathematics 

Arthur H. Christmann, S.M.D Music 

Paul C. Clifford, M.A Chairman, Department of Mathematics 

Alden C. Coder, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

Philip S. Cohen, Ph.D Chairman, Department of History 



Faculty 5 



William A. Cuff, M.A Education 

Earl C. Davis, Ph.D Education 

Leon De Leeuw, M.A Fine Arts 

Andrew Demetropoulos, M.A Mathematics 

Robert F. Dorner, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Walter Duryea, Ph.D Psychology 

Arthur W. Earl, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Industrial Education and Technology 

Steven C. L. Earley, Ph.D Enghsh 

Arthur J. Eilan, M.A Foreign Languages 

Gladys B. Ellenbogen, Ph.D Chairman, Department oi Economics 

Emma Fantone, M.A Coordinator, Audio- Visual Center 

Ernest B. Fincher, Ph.D Political Science 

Lois G. Floyd, Ph.D Psychology 

Ronald R. Flynn, M.A Chemistry 

Carl E. Frankson, Ph.D Industrial Education and Technology 

Raymond A. Franz, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

M. Herbert Freeman, Ph.D Chairman, Department oi Business Studies 

Paul E. Froehlich, Ed.D Business Studies 

Joan G. Gaeng, M.A Education 

Andrew R. Gallopo, Ph.D Chemistry 

Robert Garfunkel, M.A N.S.F. Program: Mathematics 

Irwin Gawley, Jr., Ed.D Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

Elizabeth M. Geiss, M.A Fine Arts 

Abraham Gelfond, Ph.D Education 

Elsie O. Gibson, M.L.S Library Science 

Paul B. Gloeckner, M.A Foreign Languages 

Harrison Goodall, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Alfred H. Gorman, Ed.D Education 

Carl Gottschall, M.S Mathematics 

Donald B. Gregg, M.A Education 

Michael F. X. Grieco, M.A Enghsh 

Howard L. Haas, Ed.D Business Studies 

Ronald F. Haas, Ed.D Education 

Katharine B. Hall, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Home Economics 

Imad E. Hamdan, M.A.T Physics/Earth Science 

Lawrence B. Hamel, Ph.D Education 

Charles L. Hamilton, Ph.D Physics/Earth Science 

Frank B. Hanson, Ph.D English 

Edward Haupt, M.A Psychology 

Herbert J. Hauer, Ph.D Psychology 

Eleanor C. Healey, Ph.D Enghsh 

Joseph C. Hecht, Ed.D Distributive Education 

George D. Heiss, Ed.D Education 

Richard H. Hodson, M.A Physics/Earth Science 

Harry H. Hoitsma, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

George A. Horn, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

Gilbert O. Hourtoule, M.D Chairman, Department of Political Science 

6 Faculty 



Edward W. Johnson, M.A PoJifica] Science 

Raymond Jump, M.A I'.ducation 

Abraham S. Kampf, Ph.D Fine Arts 

Elizabeth P. Kelley, M.A J/o;nc Kconomics 

Lawrence B. Kenyon, Ed.D Education 

John P. King, M.A Foreign Languages 

Helcne Klibbe, Ph.D Foreign Languages 

Mathilda S. Knecht, M.A Foreign Languages 

Leah K. Koditschek, Ph.D Biology 

William G. Kocllner, M.A N.S.F. Program; Mathematics 

Mark Koppel, Ph.D Psychology 

Walter E. Kops, M.A History 

Ludwig Kowalski, Ph.D Physics/Earth Science 

Stephen W. Kowalski, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Physics/Earth Science 

Doris Kraemer, Ph.D Psychology 

Sidney J. Kronish, Ph.D Economics 

S. Marie Kuhnen, Ph.D Chairnian, Department of Biology 

Richard A. Kyle, M.A Fine Aits 

Marcoantonio Lacatena, M.A ALithematics 

Gerhard Lang, Ph.D Education 

Gilbert Leight, Ph.D Speech 

Edith G. H. Lenel, Ph.D Foreign Languages 

Charlotte Lockwood, M.A Fine Aits 

Wade S. MacConnell, M.A Speech 

Evan M. Malctsky, Ph.D Mathematics 

Charles H. Martens, Ed.D Fine Arts 

Rosemarie McCauley, M.A Business Studies 

W^illiam C. McCreath, M.F.A Fine Arts 

Samson McDowell, Ph.D Biology 

Clyde W. McElroy, Ed.D Speech 

Morris G. McGee, Ed.D EngUsh 

Matt Merfeld, Ed.D N.S.F. Program: Mathematics 

Frank P. Merlo, Ed.D Education 

Ben Minor, NLE.E Physics/Eaith Science 

Karl R. Moll, M.A Chairman. Depaitment of Speech 

\\'ard Moore, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Music 

Lois A. More, Ed.D Histoiy 

Earl E. Mosier, Ph.D Education 

Margaret R. Mukherjee, M..\ Home Economics 

Gideon-Cyrus Mutiso, Ph.D Political Science 

Louis C. Nanassy, Ed.D Business Studies 

Gideon Nettler, B.S Mathematics 

William R. Parzynski, M.S Mathematics 

Earl K. Peckham, Ed.D Education 

James P. Pettegrove, M.A English 

George P. Placek, \LA Chemistry 

Gordon Plummer, Ed.D Chairman, Dc/)artmcnt of Fine Aits 

Faculty 7 



Samuel Pratt, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Sociology 

Dorothy M. Priesing, M.A Music 

Sara F. Prieto, Ph.D Foreign Languages 

Bertha B. Quintana, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Anthropology 

Sandford R. Radner, Ed.D Enghsh 

Robert C. Ramsdell, M.A Physics/Earth Science 

Herbert E. Reaske, M.A Enghsh 

John G. Redd, Ph.D Health and Physical Education 

Maynard L. Rich, M.S Education 

Eloisa Rivera-Rivera, Ph.D Foreign Languages 

John P. Roberts, M.A Enghsh 

Albert D. Rossetti, M.A Business Studies 

George Rotter, Ph.D Psychology 

Helen E. Royer, Ph.D History 

Charity E. Runden, Ph.D Education 

Doris H. Rushnk, M.A Home Economics 

George E. Salt, M.A Education 

May D. Sandford, Ed.D Home Economics 

Joseph C. Savage, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Maria Schantz, M.A Education 

Marion Schiebel, M.A Fine Arts 

Joan Schleede, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

Fred Schumm, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Douglas M. Schwegel, Ph.D Enghsh 

Jerome M. Seidman, Ph. D Psychology 

Madeleine A. Sergent, M.A Foreign Languages 

John Seymour, Ph.D Psychology 

Abbie F. Shapiro, Ed.D Psychology 

Paul P. Shubeck, Ph.D Biology 

Miriam Silver, M.S Home Economics 

Betty K. Sommer Health and Physical Education 

Ira R. Sugarman, Ph.D Psychology 

Janet Susi, M.A Foreign Languages 

Jimmyle L. Swope, M.A Health and Physical Education 

Eidola Jean Talley, M.A Education 

Marcha P. Tatkon, M.A Anthropology 

Charles J. Teryek, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Richard W. Tews, Ph.D Director, Panzer School of Physical Education and Hygiene 

Anita E. Uhia, M.A Education 

Palmina A. Uzzolino, M.A Business Studies 

Joseph Venturini, M.Ed Education 

Ralph A. Vernacchia, M.A Fine Arts 

Hazel M. Wacker, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

William C. Walsh, M.A N.S.F. Program: Mathematics 

Ralph Walter, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Education 

Ruth A. Ward, M.A Education 

Walter R. Westphal, M.A Mathematics^ 

8 Faculty 



Benjamin F. Wilkes, Ed.D Music 

Daniel Williams, Ph.D Psychology 

Robert B. Williams, Ed.D Education 

Thomas J. Wilt, M.M Music 

Kenneth C. Wolff, M.A Mathematics 

Peter F. Worms, Ed.D Psychology 

Louis E. Zerbe, M.M Music 




Faculty 9 



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 

The Evening Division program is designed specifically to meet the 
needs of: 

1. Matriculated students enrolled in graduate programs who wish to meet 
requirements for the Master of Arts degree. 

2. Teachers-in-service who desire to complete degree requirements, to improve 
their professional standing, or to take courses for state certification purposes. 

3. Graduates from liberal arts colleges seeking certification to teach in the 
New Jersey public secondary schools. 

4. Persons interested in pursuing college work for cultural or avocational pur- 
poses whether or not they desire credit. 

5. Persons interested in special workshops, institutes, and seminars. 

6. High School graduates interested in pursuing college study for purposes of 
attaining a Bachelors degree on a part time basis at Montclair State College 
through the Evening Division and Summer Session. 



UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Students may pursue college study in one of three categories: Students 
seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree (Degree Candidate), students seeking a 
Master of Arts degree (Degree Candidate), or students not seeking a degree. 



DEGREE CANDIDATES — Matriculation for the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

Evening Degree Piogram — This undergraduate program is designed for 
qualified graduates from accredited high schools or qualified transfer students 
from other colleges interested in pursuing college study on a part time basis 
in the evening for the degree. Courses are offered in the evening, leading to 
a Bachelor of Arts degree in the liberal arts areas of Business Studies, English, 
History and in the teacher education field of Industrial Arts. 



Application Procedures for Admission 
to the Evening Division Program 

I. REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR PERMISSION 
TO BEGIN COURSE WORK 

A. U.S. citizenship or proof of eligibihty. 

B. Graduation from an approved four-year high school or an equivalency, 
diploma. ! 

C. File an application and supporting credentials with the Evening Divi- 
sion. Be sure to enclose the required $10.00 APPLICATION FEE. Send 
a check or money order, NO CASH, payable to MONTCLAIR STATE 

10 Undergraduate Programs 



COLLEGE. TTie necessary forms may be obtained in the Evening 
Division office. 

D. Request your high school to send a TRANSCRIPT of your record 
dncctJy to the Evening Division — Admissions. Please use the college 
form. Your official high school transcript must show a minimum of 16 
units, (a unit is a year's work in a subject). Included in the 16 units 
required for admission are English (4 units), Algebra (1 unit). Lab 
Science (1 unit), American History (PAD) (2 units), Foreign Lan- 
guage * (2 units), electives from above (3 units). Free Electives (3 
units). If an applicant is deficient in any of the areas, he must arrange 
to complete the requirements by taking an approved high school 
course and/or by passing the State Equivalency Examination in the 
subject concerned. Applicants holding equivalency diplomas must 
submit official records showing the scores obtained on the General 
Equivalency Examinations. 

E. Students with prior college experience MUST submit transcripts from 
ALL institutions attended. Failure to do so will invalidate the applica- 
tion. Students who wish to transfer credit to Montclair must also 
complete the COURSE DESCRIPTION form. If the College En- 
trance Examination and/ or interview are required of a student with prior 
college work, the student will be notified by this office. 

F. Have the PERSONAL REFERENCE forms completed and forwarded 
to the Evening Division — Admissions. 



All credentials must be filed with the Evening Division Office at least one 
month prior to registration dates. When all credentials have been received and 
evaluated, the student will be notified as to his eligibility or ineligibility to 
begin course work in the Evening Division. 



II. MATRICULATION INTO A DEGREE PROGRAM 

Items A & B below may be completed at the applicant's earliest conveni- 
ence, but they MUST be completed before matriculation will be con- 
sidered. 

A. Students who have not taken the S.A.T. examination may take an 
examination given by the College. The Evening Division Office must 
be advised in writing of your intent soon after you have received 
permission to begin work at Montclair State College. 

B. Submit a MEDICAL REPORT signed by a physician. Use the form 
provided by the college. Please be sure the form is filled in com- 
pletely, or the processing of your application will be delayed. 

C. Students must complete 15 semester hours of academic course work 
at Montclair State College before acceptance into a degree program 
will be considered. 

D. Students should submit the "APPLICATION FOR MATRICULA- 
TION" form during the semester they are enrolled for course work 
which brings their total to 15 semester hours of study. 

E. Students submitting the "APPLICATION FOR MATRICULATION" 
form will be requested to meet with Evening Division personnel for a 
personal inteniew. 

•CANDIDATES FOR INDUSTRIAL ARTS MAY SUBSTITUTE 2 UNITS IN THIS AREA INSTEAD. 

Undergraduate Programs 11 



DEGREE CANDIDATES — Matriculation for the Master of Arts Degree 

Ma/or Areas — Graduate programs are offered in the following major areas: 
Administration and Supervision, Business Education, Distributive Education, 
English, Fine Arts, Foreign Languages (French and Spanish), Health Education, 
Home Economics, Industrial Education and Technology, Mathematics, Music, 
Outdoor Education and Conservation, Physical Education, Psychology, Pure 
and Applied Mathematics, Reading, Science, Social Sciences, Speech Arts, 
Speech Therapy and Student Personnel Services, including School Social Work 
(the visiting teacher). In addition, a major in Teaching is also available. 

Persons Eligible — These programs are open to teachers in service, as well 
as those interested in professional growth who hold a Bachelor's degree from an 
accredited college or university. 

Admission Piocedmes 

1. File an apphcation with the Evening Division/ Graduate and pay a 
$10.00 apphcation for admission fee. 

2. Have forwarded to the Evening Division/ Graduate official transcripts 
of all previous college work, (Upon acceptance, a student will be fur- 
nished a definite statement of requirements, entitled a Work Program. 
The work program must be presented when a student registers in person.^ 

3. Submit Graduate Record Examination scores. 

All applications for admission to the Graduate Program and supporting 
credentials must be postmarked on or before: 

July 16, 1969 For 1969 Fall Admission 

November 16, 1969 For 1970 Spring Admission 

April 15, 1970 For 1970 Summer Admission 

Applications received after a filing deadline will be processed in accord- 
ance with the next filing date. 

General Information 

Transfer oi Credits: Not more than 8 semester hours of work taken at Mont-f 
clair prior to matriculation are accepted for credit toward the M.A. degree. 
Transfer of graduate credit from other accredited institutions — up to 8| 
semester hours — may be granted. 

Master's Thesis: Students writing a thesis must register for the course, Denj 
partmental 600, Master's Thesis, which carries 4 semester hours of credit. 
For further information regarding the thesis, see the Graduate Bulletin. 

Application for Final Evaiuation: This application form is obtained in thf 
Evening Division Office by the candidate anticipating the completion of the] 
degree requirements. The responsibility for making application rests with thq 
candidate. This form must be completed and returned before: 

November 1 5 for students completing requirements in the Spring Semeste 

March 1 5 for students completing requirements by the end of th 
Summer Session 

12 Graduate Programs 



July 1 for students completing requirements in the Fall Semester 

Students should check with advisors concerning final examination dates and 
other details involved with the graduation procedure. 

Comprehensive Examination: The October examination will not be given by 
all departments and students should consult with their advisors. The March 
examination \^•ill be given as follows: 

March 11, 7:00 p.m. Business Education, Distributive Education, Ad- 
ministration and Supervision, Student Personnel Services, Industrial Arts. 

March 14, 9:00 a.m. Reading, English, Home Economics, Foreign Lan- 
guages, Mathematics, Music, Psychology, Social Science, Speeech. 

Some departments will schedule oral examinations. Students should check 
with their advisors. 

It is the student's responsibilitv to file the "NOTIFICATION FOR 
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION" form with his advisor. Tlie form is 
available in the Evening Di\ision Office. This procedure should be completed 
at least six (6) weeks prior to the examination date in order to allow ample 
time for the department to communicate with each candidate concerning 
any pre-examination procedure. Students who fail the departmental Compre- 
hensive Examination are permitted to retake this examination on the next 
examination date and no more than three times. 

STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO CONSULT THE GRADUATE BULLE- 
TIN FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. 

STUDENTS NOT SEEKING A DEGREE, but 

1. Desiiing to Transfer Credit. Persons who wish to enroll in courses for 
the purpose of having credit transferred to another institution may be admit- 
ted by submitting to the Director of Evening Division an official letter from 
the Dean of the University or College in which they are earning the degree. 
This letter must contain a statement that the student is in good standing, his 
accumulative average, and the courses or kind of courses for which the student 
may register. 

2. Desiiing to pursue Undergraduate Work; Persons who desire to take 
courses for cultural, vocational or avocational purposes, but who do not wish to 
engage in a degree program may enroll for course work not exceeding nine 
semester hours (eight in the summer) in any one semester or a total of fifteen 
semester hours. Students who desire to take more than fifteen semester hours 
will be required to matriculate for the degree as described above. (See "pro- 
cedures for permission to begin course work" page 10.) 

3. Desiring to Audit; Persons who desire to take courses for cultural, vo- 
cational, professional, or avocational purposes, but who do not wish college 
credit, may register as auditors. All persons auditing a course must establish 

tlfij eligibility, register, and pay the same tuition fees as other students. 

4. Desiiing initial Teaching Certificates, (emergency, provisional or 
standard): Before registration will be accepted, students should follow instruc- 
tions listed under the heading, 'Teacher Certification Information". 

5. Desiiing woik beyond M.A. or for advanced certificates. 

Graduate Programs 13 



TEACHER CERTIFICATION INFORMATION 

I. ENROLLING AT MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

A. Students who plan to take courses leading to certification for sec- 
ondary and/or special subject teaching must file an Application for 
Admission form with the Evening Division at Montclair State College. 
The completed application form, ten dollars ($10.00) non-refundable 
application fee, official college transcripts, and a letter stating the 
subject area(s) in which certification is desired, must be forwarded 
to the Evening Division (Attention: Certification Advisor) at least 
one month prior to the registration dates. Evaluation of credentials 
will be made by the Evening Division as part of the admissions 
procedure. 

B. Correspondence subsequently received, including the work program 
(Program Advisement Sheet), must be presented each time a student 
registers in person for a course or courses. 

C. Students interested in the combined certification and Masters of Arts 
with a major in Teaching programs should follow the same procedurej 
as a Master's Degree candidate. (See page ??.) Application for the] 
"approved certification program" should be completed prior to their) 
first registration. However, students may complete up to eight (8) 
semester hours of course work prior to acceptance in the "approved) 
certification program." 

Certification students who have not had an opportunity to file an 
application and are registering for the first time in the Evening Di- 
vision must show official evidence of having earned a Bachelor's 
degree (e.g. undergraduate transcript), and/or official evidence of 
holding an emergency certificate, and /or an official evaluation from 
the State Board of Examiners. 

D. All general questions regarding certification should be addressed to 
a Certification Advisor (Miss Fries or Miss Picard) at the College; 
pre-registration advisement by appointment is recommended. 

E. Students wishing to file an application for a teaching certificate must 
follow the procedure outlined under JV. RULES CONCERNING 
TEACHING CERTIFICATION and METHODS OF APPLYING 
FOR CERTIFICATION. 



n. COURSE OFFERINGS 

The Professional Education courses listed below, from the Summer 
Semester schedule, are approved by the State Board of Examiners 
for the first certificate to teach in the New Jersey public secondary 
schools. Courses should be selected from the following categories: 



14 Certification Information 





ineii 



METHODS Fall Spring 

10 A401B Principles and Methods of Teaching 

Bookkeeping x 

10 A401D Principles and Methods of Teaching Typing . . x 

20 A471 Teaching English in Secondary Schools x 

24 302 Foundations of Method in Art Education ... x 

28 A402 Curriculum and Teaching Industrial Education x 

40 A401X Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages 

in Secondary Schools x 

40 A422 Methods of Teaching Foreign Language 

in the Elementary Schools x 

40 A425 Methods and Materials of Teaching English 

as a Second Language (TESL) x 

50 A470 Teaching of Mathematics — Senior High School x 

80 A401 The Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools x 

90 A401 The Teaching of the Social Studies in 

Secondary Schools x 

EDUCATION PSYCHOLOGY 

65 A201 Child Psychology x 

65 A202 Adolescent Psychology x 

65 A 5 60 Advanced Educational Psychology x x 

65 A561 Developmental Psychology x x 

65 A 564 Psychology and Education of the Physically 

and Mentally Handicapped Children x x 

65 A565 Psychology and Education of the Socially and 

Emotionally Handicapped Children x x 

65 A566 Psychology and Education of the Gifted .... x 

FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 

15 A406 Educational Sociology x x 

15 A421 School in American Society (15 A595C) . . . x x 

15 A422 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 

Education (15 A595A and B) x x 

1 5 A423 Teaching in Urban Schools x 

15 A492 Comparative Education x x 

CURRICULUM 

15 A461 Junior High School Curriculum x 

GUIDANCE 

15 A451 Guidance for the Classroom Teacher x x 

Certification Information 15 



III. SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING AND PLACEMENT 
SERVICES 

A. Supervised Student Teaching (15-A403) 

Students who elect student teaching under Montclair State supervision 
(Education 403 — Supervised Student Teaching) must make appHca- 
tion in the semester preceding the semester in which student teaching 
is desired. Apphcation forms must be filed with the Director of 
Student Teaching and Placement by November 1st for student teach- 
ing in the Spring semester; by May 1st for student teaching in the 
Fall semester. 

Applications will be accepted only after a student has successfully 
completed all certification course requirements. The student teaching 
period extends full time for a period of ten consecutive weeks during 
the Fall or Spring Semester. 

Prior to filing an application for student teaching, a minimum of ten 
semester credit hours, including a course in the methods of teaching 
the specific subject for which certification is being sought, must be 
completed at Montclair State College. 

B. Supervised Teaching Seminar (15-404 & A405) 
In-service teachers holding emergency or provisional certificates may 
elect Education 404 and 405— SUPERVISED TEACHING SEMI- 
NAR instead of Education 403. These students will be admitted to 
the program only with prior written permission of the local superin- 
tendent of schools and agreement with the local school system re- 
garding a program of joint supervision with Montclair State College. 
Unlike Education 403, the Supervised Teaching Seminar may be 
the initial course in the student's program. Enrollment for the Seminar 
for Fall-Spring 1969-70 has been closed. Requests for admission to 
the Seminar should be made in February of the year prior to the 
anticipated enrollment date. 

C. Placement Seivices 

Registration with the Placement Office is open to all students who 
have successfully completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of 
course work at Montclair and are eligible for a teaching certificate. 
Services of the Office include notification of job openings for which 
the applicant is qualified and preparation of supporting credentials. 

Additional information concerning student teaching and placement may be 
obtained from the Director of Student Teaching and Placement. 



IV. RULES CONCERNING TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Every teacher in New Jersey must: 

1. Be at least eighteen years old. 

2. Be a graduate of an approved high school or have an equivalent 
education or experience as determined by the State Board of 
Examiners. 

16 Certification Information 



3. Be a citizen of the United States, or have prehminary citizenship 
status as defined by the law enacted in 1956. 

4. Hold a bachelor's degree, unless otherwise stipulated by State 
Board of Examiners. 



METHODS OF APPLYING FOR CERTIFICATION 

A. Applicants Who Have Assurance of Employment in the Public 
Schools of New Jersey 

Application for certification by persons who have assurance of em- 
ployment in the public schools of New Jersey should be made by 
mail or in person through the office of the County Superintendent 
of Schools in the county in which the applicant will teach. The 
County Superintendent's offices are usually located in the county 
court house buildings. 

B. Applicants Who Do Not Have Assurance of Employment 

1. Application for certification by persons who are residents of New 
Jersey but who do not have assurance of employment and must 
complete course work to meet certification requirements should 
be made in accordance with the procedure outlined above (under 
I. ENROLLING AT MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE). 

2. Application for certification by persons who are not residents of 
New Jersey and who do not have assurance of employment 
should be made by mail directly to the Bureau of Teacher 
Certification, State Department of Education, 225 West State 
Street, Trenton 25, New Jersey. 

C. Documents Required for All Certificates 

Information concerning documents required for all certificates should 
be obtained through the office of the County Superintendent of 
Schools. 



D. ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATE 

Upon satisfactory completion of an approved certification program, 
each student will submit official transcripts to and file an application 
for certification with the office of the County Superintendent of 
Schools (if employed, with County Superintendent in the count}' in 
which student is employed; if unemployed, with County Superin- 
tendent in county in which student resides). Completion of final 
application form, payment of fees, and issuance of certificates wiW be 
handled by the County Superintendent of Schools and the State 
Board of Examiners. The Montclair State College Evening Division 
must be notified by students about certification program completion 
so that files may be properly inactivated. 

Certification information 17 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES 

STUDENTS RESPONSIBILITY. The College expects those who are admitted 
to assume responsibility for knowing and meeting the various regulations and 
procedures set forth in the College catalogs. The College reserves the right to 
terminate the enrollment of any student whose conduct, class attendance, or 
academic record should prove unsatisfactory. 

CREDIT LOADS. Graduate students may not register for more than six (6) 
semester hours in a semester and four (4), as a maximum, is strongly recom- 
mended. Undergraduate students may not register for more than nine (9) 
semester hours in a semester and six (6), as a maximum, is strongly recom- 
mended. 

COURSE NUMBERING. A course numbering system has been developed foi 
all courses in the various departments and curricula. Courses are numbered in 
the following manner: 



100-199 


Freshman 


400-499 


Senior-Graduate 


200-299 


Sophomore 


500-699 


Graduate 


300-399 


Junior 







WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE. A written notice to the Director of 
Evening Division is required. (Notification to the instructor does not constitute 
an official withdrawal.) Refunds are computed from the date of receipt of such 
written notice. Students who do not submit a written notice will receive the 
mark of ''F" in those courses which they cease to attend. Students who with- 
draw after the mid-point (see dates on inside front cover) will receive an 
automatic grade of "F". 

Withdrawal from courses that meet more than or less than a full semester! 
is allowed up to the mid-point of the course. 

GRADES. Only students enrolled for credit receive grades. The following| 
final grades may be received: 

A Excellent B Good 

C Fair D Poor 

F Failure IN Incomplete 

WP Withdrawn, Passing WF Withdrawn, Failure 

NC No Credit 

The mark ''D" is not accepted for Master's degree credit at Montclair Stat 
College. The Mark "WP" is given to those who submit in writing their intei 
tion of withdrawing from a course before the mid-point in the semester and ai 
doing passing work in the courses involved. "WF" is assigned to students wl 
withdraw before the mid-point and are doing failing work at the time of wit 
drawal. The mark "F" signifies: (I) failure, (2) student has failed to subnT] 
written notice of his withdrawal, (3) the student has requested withdrav^ 
after the mid-point in the semester. 

18 Academic Regulations j 



31 0'.| 

:itiit:l 
sucl 
etlii 



The mark '*IN" is given to a student who, because of ilhiess, is unable to 
complete the work by the end of a semester. Tlie work must be completed by 
April 15 for incompletes rccei\ed in the fall semester and November 15 for 
incompletes received in the Spring or Summer semesters; if said work is not 
finished on the prescribed date, a final grade of "F" is recorded. For courses 
that meet more than or less than a full semester, the above information applies 
but is geared to the duration of the course. 

An official record showing credits and grades earned will be mailed to the 
student three weeks following the close of the semester. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE: All changes in the original class schedule 
must be made in the Evening Division or during registration periods. Such 
changes incur a $5.00 fee. The deadline ioi making changes is piioi to the 
second meeting of the class. To change from ''auditor" to "credit" or vice-versa, 
a student must make a formal application not later than the mid-point in 
the semester. Forms are available in the Evening Division Office. 

CANCELLATION OF COURSES: The college reserves the right to 
close any course for which the enrollment is insufficient. Students may then 
register in another course or receive a refund of tuition. If prerequisites are 
required (see course listings) the student must be sure he has fulfilled them or 
their equivalents. 

TRANSCRIPT REQUESTS: Students should complete the transcript 
request form available in the Evening Division Office. Students making such 
requests in letter form must include: own name and address, name and 
address of receiver of transcript, number to be sent, last semester in which 
registered, whether there are both undergraduate and graduate records at 
Montclair. The fee is $1.00, payable in advance to Montclair State College. 




Academic Regulations T9 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Office Hours and Phone j 

On all days when classes are scheduled, the Evening Division office hours | 

are as follows: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to I 

9:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 1 
Phone 746-9500, Extension 201. 

Storm Closing 

Students should assume that all courses will be held as scheduled. In 
case of storm, daytime classes may be cancelled, but Evening Division courses 
are usually held. If in doubt, telephone the College. The following radio 
stations will announce an official college closing; WCTC, WPAT, WOR, 
WKER. 

Student Parking 

The college maintains a number of parking lots to be used by students. 
These areas are designated on a map of the campus that is on the inside back 
cover of this announcement. Under no circumstances are students to park in 
unauthorized areas. Traffic regulations will be strictly enforced and violations 
will be liable for a fine and towing charges. The College assumes no responsi- 
bility for the car or its contents while it is parked on College property. 

Parking decals may be obtained at registration or in the parking office 
(annex I). The charge will be $10.00 for decks purchased in the Fall or 
Spring (valid for Fall, Spring and Summer) and $5.00 for decals purchased 
in the Summer (valid for the Summer only). 

Veterans' Counselor 

Veterans seeking admission to the Evening Division should apply well 
in advance of the registration dates for a certificate of eligibility and entitle- 
ment at the Newark, New Jersey office (20 Washington Place) of the Veterans 
Administration. In requesting this certificate, the veteran is advised to indicate 
clearly his educational objective. The Veterans Administration has established 
certain limitations, especially with regard to change of course. In order that 
a veteran may be assured that his certificate is in order and that he has taken 
the proper steps to expedite his training, under the G. I. Bill, he should report 
at registration time to the Veterans' Counselor whose office is located in College] 
Hall. 

Work Scholarships 

A limited number of tuition scholarships are available. Students are as- 
signed work in the various College departments. Write to the Financial Aids 
Director for information. 

Hi 

SERVICES ll 

ACADEMIC ADVISORS; Appointments with members of the Evening Divi" 
sion, or Department Advisors may be made by mail or telephone. Appointment 
should be made as early as possible prior to the end of the current semestei 
Advisors are available during hours of registration. 

AUDIO-VISUAL CENTER. The Center provides audio-visual material 
equipment and services for use by faculty and students for classroom instructicj 
and presentation. The staff of the Center is available for special consultation r 

20 General Information 



audio-visual problems, for demonstrations of audio-visual materials and methods 
and for special teaching and training in the area of audio-visual education. The 
Center handles the scheduling of all films for the College, as well as their 
ordering, mailing, and rental. Student assistants are provided whenever the 
use of equipment is requested but are also available for other services. 

BOOKSTORE: Located adjacent to the main lobby of the Student Life 
Building, this on-campus facility will be open during all hours of registration 
and evenings during the first two meetings of each class until 8:00 p.m. 
Thereafter, regular hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. will be in effect. 

Saturday hours during the Fall and Spring semesters are 8:00-11:00 
a.m. on Saturdays when Evening Division classes are in session. 

Craduate books will be available for purchase one week before registra- 
tion for the benefit of those graduates registering by mail. 

HEALTH SERVICES: There is a registered nurse on duty in the College 
Health office. This office is located in the west wing of Russ Hall. Emergency 
medical care is available. 

Regular office hours are from 8 A.M. until 4 P.M. After 4 P.M. — Emer- 
gencies only. Between 10 P.M. and 7:45 A.M. a call must be made so that 
the nurse will open the door for you. Phone: 746-9505. 

LIBRARY; The Hany A. Sprague Library is an attractive, modern, air-con- 
ditioned building located centrally on the campus. Students and faculty are 
encouraged to use its comfortable facilities which include study tables, in- 
dividual study desks, group conference rooms, faculty carrels and inviting 
lounge areas. Smoking lounges are provided on the ground floor where also 
is located a typing room for student use. 

A knowledgeable staff of librarians is on hand to guide students in the 
use of the Library's substantial collection of books and periodicals which is 
constantly expanding. Liberal lending regulations are designed to facilitate the 
students' access to this collection. Two copying machines are available at 
nominal cost to those who wish to eliminate tedious note taking from printed 
materials in the Library. Periodicals, books and documents in microtext are 
i^ accessible through the Library's microfilm, microfiche and microcard readers. 
y The general resources of the Library are augmented by a Curriculum 

^'^ Laboratory, a rapidly growing collection of United States and New Jersey 
government publications and special collections that include the China Institute 
Library, a New Jersey collection and four important poetry collections for 
special research. 

SNACK BAR: Located in Student Life Building. Open Monday thru Thurs- 
day until 9:00 p.m. and Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. until 12 noon. The Snack 
Bar is a self-supporting operation. (Hours are subject to change depending 
upon income.) 



Dm' 



stiuctif 



T.U.B.: Adding to the Life Hall facilities, T.U.B. (Temporary Union Building 
— Annex D) provides a lounge, recreation (pool, ping pong and other games) 
and T.V. area, and a snack bar where food is prepared to order. 

T.U.B. is open seven days a week: Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m.- 
11:00 p.m.; Saturdav from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 midnight; and, Sundav from 
',[12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. 

General Information 21 



SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 

FALL AND SPRING SEMESTERS 1969-1970 

READING IMPROVEMENT LABORATORY: Available to New Jersey 
students from intermediate grades through high school; small group and in- 
dividual instruction is given according to age, grade and achievement levels. 
Fall and Spring sessions meet once a week from 3:30 to 5:30 P.M. Summer 
sessions meet daily for four weeks from 10:00 A.M. to 12 noon. The latest in 
equipment, films, texts and workshop materials are used to demonstrate speed 
of comprehension, study techniques and vocabulary growth. Enrollment is 
limited. Apply at least three months in advance of each term. (Fee includes 
diagnostic interview.) 

Fee: $50.00 Write to: Coordinator, Reading and Study-Skills Center 

SPEECH AND HEARING CENTER: The Speech and Hearing Center 
offers intensive remedial speech services during the Fall and Spring semester 
for children between 4 and 18 years of age. The center meets from Monday 
through Friday. The program is designed to provide therapy for children with 
the usual types of speech problems, as well as for those who have major prob- 
lems of voice, articulation, and rhythm (stuttering). Children with retarded 
language development or loss of language are also eligible. Therapy is also 
provided for children who have speech problems associated with tongue 
thrusting, malocclusion, cleft palate, hearing impairments, and special learn- 
ing disabiUties. 

There is no charge for the therapy, but there is a $25.00 administrative 
charge for the program per semester. Admissions may follow a comprehensive 
diagnostic interview for which there is a $25.00 fee. Appointments for diag- 
nosis may be arranged by calling the Speech Department secretary. 

Players Presents 

Montclair State College will present five productions during the Fall and 
Spring Semesters, 1969-1970. These plays are open to the public. For informa- 
tion and reservations, correspondence should be directed to Players. 



Plays to be presented are: 






Barefoot in the Park, Neil Simon 


SeptemberlS, 19, 20 


8:30 p.m. 


Marat/Sade, Peter Weiss 


Novemberl2, 13, 14, 15 
November 14 


8:30 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 


Player's Workshop, to be announced 


Decemberll, 12, 13 


8:30 p.m. 


A Flea in her Ear, Georges Feydeau 


February 25, 26, 27, 28 


8:30 p.m. 


West Side Story, Arthur Laurents 
Robert E. Lee 
Leonard Bernstein 


April 16, 17, 18, 23, 24, 25 
April 17 


8:30 p.m. 
2:30 p.m. 









22 Special Activities 



SPECIAL TOUR ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CHRISTMAS TOUR 

Field Studies A406 Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands 

December 24, 1969, to December 31, 1969 



Cr. 2 s.h. 



Mr. Bye 

This is an eight-day, field study course devoted to a survey of our nearest island 
possessions. It includes an exploration of San Juan and its vicinity, including the 
University and the rain forest, a two-day trip through the island, visiting pineapple, 
coffee, sugar, textile, and rum producing areas, churches, homes and historic places. 
One day is spent in St. Thomas, largest of the Virgin Islands. The trip to and from 
the islands is made by air. 



SPRING TOUR 
Field Studies A467 



Florida 



Cr. 2 s.h. 



March 27, 1970 to April 4, 1970 Mr. Bye 

This is a field-study course covering the Florida peninsula including both coasts, 
the Everglades, and the Lake Region. Among the places visited are ancient St. Augus- 
tine; the winter playgrounds at Palm Beach and Miami; the Tamiami Trail through 
the Everglades; the west coast cities of Sarasota, St. Petersburg, and Tampa; and the 
Lake Region in the neighborhood of the Lake Wales and Orlando. The trip affords 
opportunity for topographical, historical, and industrial studies. 



SUMMER TOUR 
Field Studies A423 



July 11, 1970 to August 1, 1970 



The British Isles Cr. 3 s.h. 

Mr. Bye 

This is a comprehensi\e overview of the British Isles, spending about a week 
each in England, Scotland, and Ireland and a day in Wales. Geographic, historical 
and literary places of interest will be visited including Cambridge, Oxford, London, 
York, Windermere, Hampton Court, Windsor Castle, Salisbury, Stonehenge, Strat- 
Iford-on-Avon, and many other places in England; Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the Loch 
district in Scotland; Caernarvan and Bettws-y-Coed in Wales; Dublin, Cork, Killarney, 
Limerick, and Shannon in Ireland. 



Field Study Tours 23 



REGISTRATION 

BY MAIL 

All students (except Montclair State (day) and other college undergraduates) 
who have registered at Montclair State College during any of the last two semesters, 
will receive registration materials. Other students previously registered at Montclair 
State College, since the summer of 1966, may receive materials for mail legistration 
by writing or calling the Evening Division Office. Students who have never registered 
or who have not registered since the summer of 1966 in the Evening Division or 
Summer Session at Montclair State College must register in person. Students are to, 
follow the registration procedure as described below: 



Fall & Spring Mail Registration Procedure 

1. Complete REGISTRATION FORM— Use Ink. 

a. Correct printed information and complete information requested in 
Section A, B, C, D, & E, Use the following codes for completing Section B: 

Item Code and Meaning 

Box No. 1 Semester Hours Enter Total No. S.H. for which registering 

Box No. 2 Credit (or Audit) 1 Taking courses for credit 

2 Not taking courses for credit (i.e. Auditor) 

Box No. 3 Resident Status 1 Live in N.J. 

2 Live out of State but teaching in N.J. 

3 Live out of State and not teaching in N.J. 

Box No. 4 Program Number; 00 — Not in a program 30 — Lib. Sci. 

Only students in 10— Bus. Ed. 40— Lang 

approved certifica- 11 — Dist. Ed. 41 — French 

tion or degree pro- 14 — Sch. Soc. Work 46 — Spanish 

grams will list 15 — Psychology 50 — Math 

department num- 16 — Adm. & Super. 51 — Pure Math & 
ber. Others will 17— Stud. Pers. Ser. Lib. Arts Math 

be 00, 18— MAT 60— Music 

19— Reading 73— Hlth. Ed. 

20— Eng 76— Phys. Ed. 

21 — Speech & Hrg. 80 — Science 

22 — Speech & Dram. 81 — Biology 

23— Lib. Arts-Eng. 82— Chem | 

24— F. Arts 83— Physics 

26— Home Ec. 90— Soc. St. 

28— Ind. Arts 94— Lib. Arts-Hist 

Box No. 5 Sex 1 Male 2 Female 

Box No. 6 Marital Status 1 Single 2 Married 

Box No. 7 Status of Student 01... .Initial Cert. 06.. ..Other 

Xl....Appd. cert. prog. Undergraduate 

02....Pre-Matric. rM.S.C.07....Adv. Certification 
03....Matric. M.A.JEven. 08.. ..Endorsement 
04....Matric. B.A. [Div. 09.. ..Salary Equiv., or owr 
05....M.S.C. Interest, Special 

Undergraduate Student 

10.... Eve. Undergraduate- 
Non-matriculated 

Box No. 8 Highest Degree None 2 Master 

Held 1 Bachelor 3 Doctorate 



24 Mail Registration 



Box No. 9 Certificate He/d None 2 Provisional 

1 Lim. Stand. Perm. 3 Emergency 

Box No. 10 Registeiing Period 1 First time registering in the Evening Division 

or Summer Session at M.S.C. 

2 Previously registered in the Evening Division 

or Summer Session at M.S.C. 

Box No. 11 Time Code 1 Part Time (Less than 12 Semester Hours) 

2 Full Time (12 S. H. or more) 

Box No. 12 Attending under 1 Yes 2 No 

G.I. Bill 

Box No. 13 Attending under 1 Yes 2 No 

Institute 

Boxes 14, 15, & 16— Not to he Completed hy Student 

b. Complete the back of the form. 

Enter the courses you wish to take completing all columns (section only if listed) 
that are applicable. Students who need advisement may wait until they have met 
with their advisor before completing this section. 

Students registering for courses have more than one section are advised to 
list alternate choices in order of preference. 

Advisement and Departmental Signatures. Students who are presently matriculated 
in an M.A. program, in an undergraduate Evening Division program or in a certifica- 
tion program (i.e. those who have a work program prescribed by the college) DO 
NOT have to meet with their advisor for a signature, providing they are not deviat- 
ing from their work program or, unless so directed. 

All students not in prescribed programs who desire to register by mail must meet 
with the departmental advisor, and secure his signature (as required by the college) in 
his office according to the schedule below: 

for the Fall Semester for the Spring Semester 

August 5-6—1:30-2:30 PM December 8-11— 6:15-7:15 PM 

If courses are taken in more than one department, a signature is required from an 
advisor in each department. Advisor's office locations will be posted outside the Evening 
Division Office. 

c. Sign and Date back of form, 

2. RECEIPT VOUCHER— Use Ball Point Pen or Pencil 

Complete the Receipt Voucher — according to the fee information which follows. 
This becomes your identification after validation. DO NOT DETACH. 



Mail Registration 25 





UNDERGRADUATE 






GRADUATE 






REGISTRATION 






REGISTRATION 










Student 










Student 




No. 






Union 




No. 






Union 




S.H. 


Tuition 


Fee 


Fee 


Total 


S.H. 


Tuition 


Fee 


Fee 


Total 


1 


$ 20.00 


$2.00 


$1.00 


$ 23.00 


1 


$ 25.00 


$2.00 


$1.00 


$ 28.00 


2 


40.00 


2.00 


2.00 


44.00 


2 


50.00 


2.00 


2.00 


54.00 


3 


60.00 


2.00 


3.00 


65.00 


3 


75.00 


2.00 


3.00 


80.00 


4 


80.00 


2.00 


4.00 


86.00 


4 


100.00 


2.00 


4.00 


106.00 


5 


100.00 


2.00 


5.00 


107.00 


5 


125.00 


2.00 


5.00 


132.00 


6 


120.00 


2.00 


6.00 


128.00 


6 


150.00 


2.00 


6.00 


158.00 


7 


140.00 


2.00 


7.00 


149.00 












8 


160.00 


2.00 


8.00 


170.00 












9 


180.00 


2.00 


9.00 


191.00 













FULL-TIME GRADUATE STUDENTS registering for 12 semester hours or more: 

$220.00 $10.00 $230.00 

3. Parking; Decals are required of all students who park on campus. 

Students who need decals must complete the "MSC" Vehicle Registration Form" 
and write in 'Tarking" opposite "Other Fee" on the receipt voucher. This fee 
must be included in the total amount to be paid. The charge will be $10.00 
for decals purchased in the Fall or Spring (valid for Fall, Spring, and Summer) 
and $5.00 for decals purchased in the Summer (valid for the Summer only). 

Schedule for Mailing Registration 

Students should remit their Registration Form, Receipt Voucher, Vehicle Registra- 
tion Form and check or money order according to the priority below. Students may 
mail after the initial priority date but not before. 



Status Code (Box 7) 



Fall semester 



Spring Semester 
December 1-4 
January 5-9 



XI, 03, 04 August 18-22 

01, 02, 07, X7, 08, 09, 10 August 25-29 

Registration will be processed on a priority basis. 

All registrations which are incorrect, incomplete or postmarked after August 29, 
1969 for the Fall registration or January 9, 1970 for the Spring registration will be 
returned and students will be required to register in person according to the pre- 
scribed priority on pages 28 and 29. 



Make Check Payable To: 
Montclair State College 



Mail Registrations To: 

Evening Division 

Montclair State College 

Upper Montclair, New Jersey 07043 

ATTN: REGF 



CLASS ADMISSION CARDS, LIBRARY-IDENTIFICATION LABEL, 
PARKING DECAL AND RECEIPT WILL BE MAILED TO THE STUDENT. 



26 Mail Registration 




IN PERSON REGISTRATION 

Those students who cannot take advantage of mail registration must 
register in person, according to the priority below. Students who have re- 
ceived registration materiais in the mail should bring them when registering 
in person. Details for registration will be posted in College Hall. Students 
must bring records of previous college work in order to establish priority for 
registration. In addition, matriculated students must present their W^ork Pro- 
gram to ad\isors. Students registering as first time certification or special 
students must present a transcript of their undergraduate or graduate studies. 
Previously registered certification students must ha\e their Work Program 
or a letter from Trenton. 



A student has completed his registration when; 

1. His registration forms have been properly and completely filled out. 

2. His program has been approved by his Departmental ad\asor and by 
advisors in other departments in which he selects courses. 

3. His fees have been paid. 

4. He receives his class admission cards, Library-Identification label and 
parking decal. 



In Person Registration 27 



TIME AND PRIORITY SCHEDULE 
Fall Semester — 7969 



DATE & TIME 

Monday, Sept. 15 
5:00-6:30 p.m. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 



6:30-9:00 



CODE STATUS 

03 Matriculated Graduate Students and Matriculated 

04 Evening Division Undergraduate Students. 

XI Certification Students, previously registered at MSC, 
01 working toward their first certificate to teach. This 
does not include those working on advanced certifi- 
cates or endorsements on their original certificate. 

01 Certification Students, registering for the first time at 
MSC, working toward their first certificate to teach 
in New Jersey. All students must attend a registra- 
tion meeting which will be held promptly at 6:30 
p.m. in College Hall, Room 304. Registration fol- 
lows this meeting. 

02 Pre-matriculated Graduate Students. (Students who 
have filed an application for matriculation in a 
graduate major and have received a letter indicating 
they are "pre-matriculated.") 

10 



MSC Evening Division undergraduates who have 
made application and received permission to begin 
course work. 

Tuesday, Sept. 16 X7 Special students (beyond A.M., non-matriculated 
5:00-9:00 p.m. 07 students, special interests, auditors, endorsements on 

08 original certificates, out-of-state certification, and ad- 

09 vanced certification, such as guidance, secondary 
school principal, etc.) Students must bring transcript 
of undergraduate or graduate work or evidence of a 
college degree. 

Students unable to take advantage of the above priority arrangement may 
register with other groups provided they arrive after their priority schedule. 
Students MAY NOT register ahead of their priority listing. 



Late Registration 

September 17, 18, 19—3:00-5:00 p.m.— Room C-121 

September 20—9:00-12:00 noon— Room C-121 

Students registering on September 17, 18, 19 or 20 will be charged a $5.00 
late registration fee. 

NO REGISTRATIONS ACCEPTED AFTER SEPTEMBER 20. 



28 In Person Registration 



Spring Semesfer — 7 970 



DATE & TIME 

Monday, Jan. 26 
5:00-6:30 p.m. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



CODE 



STATUS 



03 Matriculated Graduate Students and Matriculated 

04 Evening Division Undergraduate Students. 

XI Certification Students, previously registered at MSC, 
01 working toward their first certificate to teach. This 
does not include those working on advanced certifi- 
cates or endorsements on their original certificate. 

01 Certification Students, registering for the first time 
at MSC, working toward their first certificate to 
teach in New Jersey. All students must attend a 
registration meeting which will be held promptly at 
6:30 p.m. in College Hall, Room 304. Registration 
follows this meeting. 

02 Pre-matriculated Graduate Students. (Students who 
have filed an application for matriculation in a 
graduate major and have received a letter indicating 
they are "pre-matriculated.") 

10 MSC Evening Division undergraduates who have 
made application and received permission to begin 



course w 



ork. 



Tuesday, Jan. 27 
5:00-9:00 p.m. 



X7 
07 
08 
09 



Special students (beyond A.M., non-matriculated 
students, special interests, auditors, endorsements on 
original certificates, out-of-state certification, and ad- 
vanced certification, such as guidance, secondary 
school principal, etc.) Students must bring transcript 
of undergraduate or graduate work or evidence of a 
college degree. 

Students unable to take advantage of the above priority arrangement may reg- 
ister with other groups provided they arrive after their priority schedule. 
Students MAY NOT register ahead of their priority listing. 



Late Registration 

January 28, 29, 50—3:00-5:00 p.m.— Room C-121 

January 31—9:00-12:00 noon— Room C-121 

Students registering on January 28, 29, 30 and January 31, will be charged 
a $5.00 late registration fee. 

NO REGISTRATIONS ACCEPTED AFTER JANUARY 31. 



In Person Registration 29 



TUITION, FEES AND EXPENSES* 

All checks should be made out to: Montchii State College 

TUITION 

New Jersey Residents and Teachers, and Non-residents 

Undergraduate (those students who do not hold a bachelor's degree) 

Per semester hour of credit $20.00 

Graduate (those students who hold at least a bachelor's degree) 

Per semester hour of credit . $25.00 

Full Time Graduate Students (12 s.h. or more) $220.00 

(includes registration fee) 
REGISTRATION FEE 

To be paid each time a student registers — non-refundable 2.00 

STUDENT UNION BUILDING FEE 

To be paid each time a student registers — non-refundable. 

$1.00 per s.h. to a maximum of $10.00 

LATE REGISTRATION 

An additional fee charged to all students who fail to register during 

the regular registration period 5.00 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FEE 

$10.00 to be paid when student files an application for admission to a 
program. This fee must accompany the application form and is not refundable. 
CHANGE OF CLASS SCHEDULE FEE 

A $5.00 fee charged to students who, after their initial registration each 
semester, desire to make any changes in their original class schedule other 
than a withdrawal from a class. 
TRANSCRIPT FEE 

$1.00 for single copy. Inquire in the Evening Division Office. 
REFUNDING OF FEES 

In accordance with a decision of the State Board of Education on May 3, 
1962, the following uniform schedule of refunds was effective in all New 
Jersey State Colleges on September 1, 1962: 

Per Cent 
Periods of Withdrawal Refunded 

Withdrawal before course begins 100% 

Withdrawal during first third of course 60% 

thru October 22 (Fall Semester) 

thru March 7 (Spring Semester) 
Withdrawal between first third and first half of course 30% 

thru November 15 (Fall Semester) 

thru April 6 (Spring Semester) 

Withdrawal during last half of course None 

The percentage of refund is based upon the total obligation. 

A reduction in a student's program is equivalent to a withdrawal. This policy 

applies to such reductions. Tuition and service charges are refunded in full if 

classes are discontinued by the authorities at the college. 

IN COMPUTING REFUNDS, THE DATE OF WITHDRAWAL IS THE DATE] 

ON WHICH THE EVENING DIVISION OFFICE RECEIVES A WRITTEN 

NOTICE FROM THE STUDENT. 



^Subject to change any time by action of the State Board of Higher Education. 
30 Fees 



EVENING DIVISION UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 



20 A106 


20 A124 


20 A225 


20 A361 


21 AlOO 


21 A106 


24 AlOO 


41 AlOOA 


41 A200A 


46 AlOOA 


46 A200A 


49 AlOOA 


50 A105 



Fall 1969 

10 AlOl Business Organization and 

Management 
10 A201 Accounting! 

10 A 30 5 Legal Environments in Business 

11 A208 Salesmanship 
20 A105 Composition and Literature I 

Composition and Literature II 

Literature and Sociology 

Early American Literature 

English Novel to 1900 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Introduction to Oral 

Interpretation 

Introduction to the Visual Arts 

Beginning French I 

Intermediate French I 

Beginning Spanish I 

Intermediate Spanish II 

Beginning Italian I 

Elements of Statistical 

Reasoning 
50 Al 1 1 Mathematics Related to the 

Social and Management 

Sciences I 
60 AlOO General Psychology 
65 A201 Child Psychology 
81 AlOO Introduction to Biological 

Science 
84 AlOO Earth Science 
84 A120 Descriptive Astronomy 
94 AlOO The Study of American History 
94 All 1 Selected Topics in American 

History of 1876 
94 Al 18 Development of Classical 

Civilization 
94 A121 Early Modern Europe, 

1350-1815 
94 A122 19th Century Europe, 

1815-1914 
94 Al 33 Development of Modern East 

Asian Civilization 
94 A212 Social History of the U.S. 



10 A201 
10 A202 
10 A300 

10 A306 

11 A417 
20 A105 
20 A106 
20 A223 
20 A226 

20 A437 

21 AlOO 
21 A204 

24 AlOO 
41 AlOOB 
41 A200B 
46 AlOOB 
46 A200B 

49 AlOOB 

50 Alll 



50 A112 



65 


AlOO 


65 A202 


80 


A418 


83 


AlOO 


84 AlOl 


94 AlOO 


94 AlOl 


94 


A112 



94 A118 

94 A121 

94 A213 
94 A424 
96 AlOO 



Spring 1970 

Accounting I 

Accounting II 

Business Mathematics 

Legal Environments in Business 

Marketing 

Composition and Literature I 

Composition and Literature II 

Myth and Literature 

Literature of the American 

Renaissance 

Victorian Prose and Poetry 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Introduction to Public 

Speaking 

Introduction to the Visual Arts 

Beginning French II 

Intermediate French II 

Beginning Spanish II 

Intermeditae Spanish II 

Beginning Italian II 

Mathematics Related to the 

Social and Management 

Sciences I 

Mathematics Related to the 

Social and Management 

Sciences II 

General Psychology 

Adolescent Psychology 

Three Centuries of Science 

Introduction to Physical 

Science 

Geology 

The Study of American History 

The Study of European History 

Selected Topics in American 

History since 1876 

Development of Classical 

Civilization 

Early Modern Europe, 

1350-1815 

Economic History of the U.S. 

Diplomatic History of Europe 

The Sociological Perspective 



Undergraduate Courses 31 



COURSES OF THE EVENING DIVISION 

Fall 1969 and Spring 1970 

The courses listed below will be offered through the Evening Division during 
the Fall, 1969 and Spring, 1970. Courses numbered 500 or above are open 
only to graduate students; those numbered 400-499, inclusive, are senior-grad- 
uate courses; and those below 400 carry undergraduate credit only. 

* Some 400 courses listed with this mark (*) indicate that they may not be 
used for graduate credit. 

THE DAILY SCHEDULE MAY BE FOUND ON PAGES through . 
All students should be careful not to enroll in courses which they have 
previously taken. The final responsibility for duplication of courses rests with 
the student. 

The College reserves the right to cancel any course or to make changes. 



CODE FOR BUILDINGS 



Auditorium A 

Annex 2 B 

College Hall C 

Annex 3 D 

Annex 4 E 

Finley Hall F 

College High School H 

Annex 1 I 



Speech K 

Fine Arts L 

Music Building M 

Panzer Gymnasium P 

Recreation Building R 

Sprague Library S 

Mallory Hall V 



ARRANGEMENT AND NUMBERING OF COURSES 
CODE FOR DEPARTMENTS 



10. 


.Business Education 


44. 


. Latin 


81. 


. Biology 


11. 


. Distributive Education 


46. 


. Spanish 


82. 


. Chemistry 


15. 


.Education 


49. 


.Italian 


83. 


. Physics 


20. 


. English 


50. 


. Mathematics 


84. 


. Earth Sciences 


21. 


. Speech 


60. 


. Music 


90. 


. Social Studies 


24. 


. Fine Arts 


63. 


. Philosophy 


91. 


.Anthropology 


26. 


. Home Economics 


65. 


. Psychology 


92. 


. Economics 


28. 


. Industrial Arts 


73. 


.Health Ed.— 


93. 


. Geography 


30. 


. Library Science 




Men & Women 


94. 


. History 


40. 


. Language 


76. 


• Phys.Ed.— 


95. 


. Political Science 


41. 


. French 




Men & Women 


96. 


. Sociology 


42. 


. German 


80. 


. Science 


99. 


. Field Studies 



32 Building Codes 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS STUDIES 

Business Education 

10 AlOl Business Organization and Management Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday & Thursday 6:30-7:45 Dr. Hecht Room C-310 

This course is an introduction to the world of business. It goes into the functions 
of business, bank services, credit, insurance, forms of business organization, location and 
layout, purchasing and stock control, production problems, finance, and personnel 
problems. 

10 A201 Accounting I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday & Wednesday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-319 

Spring Tuesday & Thursday 6:30-7:45 Staff Room C-319 

This is a basic course in accounting. It is designed for the student who has never 
studied bookkeeping. Emphasis is placed on development of a thorough understanding 
and mastery of the fundamental elements of bookkeeping and accounting. After analyz- 
ing the elementary accounting equations, the student learns to journalize, post, take a 
trial balance, and prepare financial statements, as applied to the sole proprietorship form 
of organization. 

10 A202 Accounting II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday & Wednesday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-319 

This course starts with a thorough review of the accounting cycle. The student 
learns to use special journals, controlling accounts, work sheets, classified statements, 
reserves, accruals, deferred items, reversals, special columns, and business papers. Special 
attention is given to the use of voucher system, payroll accounting, and accounting 
for taxes. 
Prerequisite: 10 201 

10 A300 Business Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Miss Uzzolino Room C-310 

This course is concerned with mathematical concepts that help the student to 
become more effective in his daily living and as a teacher of business arithmetic, per- 
centage, simple and compound interest, consumer credit and installment buying, savings 
and investments, mortgages, pensions, annuities, social security, taxation, and insurance. 

10 A305 Legal Environments in Business I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday & Wednesday 6:30-7:45 Dr. Haas Room C-319 

A study of law and its relationship to society, classes and sources of law, the 
judicial system, and court procedure. Special attention is given to contracts and 
agency. Case materials and problems are used. The Uniform Commercial Code is 
used as the basis for statutor\- interpretation. 

10 A306 Legal Environments in Business II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday & Wednesday 6:30-7:45 Dr. Haas Room C-321 

This course is a continuation of 10 305. It covers negotiable instruments, per- 
gonal property, bailments, and sales. Case materials and problems are used. The source 
■or statutory interpretation is the Uniform Commercial Code. 
Prerequisite: 10 305 

Business Studies 33 



10 A402 Principles and Methods of Teaching Bookkeeping Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Posteraro Room C-319 

A brief study is made of the history and development of bookkeeping instruction 
and materials, and aims and objectives in the light of current trends. Special attention 
is given to textbook selection, lesson planning, classroom and teaching procedures, 
tests and measurements, audio-visual and other teaching aids. A test of subject matter 
competency is required. Prerequisite: 10 semester hours of accounting. 

10 A404X Principles and Methods of Teaching Typewriting Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. McCauley Room C-317 

This course complements 10:204 and deals with the techniques of teaching 
beginning and advanced typewriting with attention given to the psychology of skill 
development. Prerequsite: 10:203. 

10 A434 Introduction to Business Data Processing Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-309 

This course familiarizes the student with the literature and vocabulary of business 
data processing — input and output media, types of equipment, installations, job analysis 
and systems development. Prerequisite: 10:201. 

10 A435 Unit Record Equipment i Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-108 

This course covers the concepts and operational techniques of punch card data 
processing machines, control panel wiring, card punch, accounting machines, verifiers 
and sorters. Four hours, lab plus two lectures. Prerequisite: 10:434. 

10 A501 Principles and Problems of Business Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Nanassy Room C-321 

Survey of basic principles and practices of business education. Topics include his- 
tory of business education, objectives, relationship of business education to general i 
education, trends and problems in the field. 

10 A502 Evaluation of Current Literature in Business Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Nanassy Room C-321 

Introduces the literature of business education to the graduate student from a i 
research point of view. Current literature from all sources — articles, research papers, | 
books — are evaluated, using selected criteria for such evaluation. 

10 A505 Administration and Supervision of Business Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Freeman Room C-321 

Study of problems of organizing, directing ,and supervising business education 
programs at the secondary school and collegiate levels. 



10 A511 Improvement of Instruction in Bookkeeping, Cr. 2 s.h. 

Accounting and Business Arithmetic 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Posteraro Room C-319 

Study of objectives, content, methods, teaching aids, and evaluation procedures, 

Prerequisites: Undergraduate methods course in bookkeeping and teaching experience 

34 Business Studies 



( 






10 A513 Improvement of Instruction in Stenography and Cr. 2 s.li. 

Secretarial Practice 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Rossetti Room C-317 

Refinement of teaching and personal skills, introduction to the latest instructional 

equipment and method are emphasized through demonstration, participation, and 

reading. Prerequisites: Undergraduate methods in stenography and teaching experience. 

10 A526 Advanced Business Law Cases Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Haas Room C-228 

Designed to furnish a broad understanding and background in areas requiring 
considerable training to be effective in the classroom. Cases are concerned with 
the topics of contracts, negotiable instruments, insurance, bailments, carriers, sales, 
property, landlord and tenant, torts, and business crimes. Prerequisite: 6 semester 
hours of business law. 

10 A530 Business Education in Post-High School Institutions Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spiing Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Smion Room C-321 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the purposes, curricula, 
methods and problems of teaching business education subjects in post-high school insti- 
tutions, including technical institutes, two-year, and four-year colleges. 

10 A603 Research Seminar in Business Education Cr. 2 s.h. 
Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Froehlich Room C-310 

Includes study and analysis of significant research studies in business education, 
investigation of procedures in education research, and techniques of thesis writing. 
Prerequisites: Education 503, Business Education 501, and Business Education 502, 
or equivalents. 

Distributive Education 

11 A208 Salesmanship Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Tuesday & Thursday 6:30-7:45 Mrs. Sherdell Room B-002 

This course covers the selection of prospects, the approach, determining needs, 
sales presentation, overcoming objections of the customer, closing the sale and "plus" 
selling. Assigned sales presentations are incorporated in the applications of the selling 
techniques learned. (Part-time work experience is recommended herewith for salesman- 
ship.) 

11 A417 Marketing Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday & Thursday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-310 

A study of the principles underlying the distribution and ser\ices from the 
manufacturer to the consumer. Marketing policies and practices are covered as well 
as the evolution and change of marketing procedures and recent governmental activi- 
ties affecting marketing. A managerial approach to the subject is given, 

11 A419 Merchandise Information Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Hecht Room C-310 

Merchandise information, both textiles and non-textiles, are covered to give 

! the student the background and selling information needed in the field of retailing. 

Students will be given standards for determining quality of products and a knowl- 
'edge of how to care for them. Manufacturing processes of various products will be 

considered. 

Business Studies 35 



1 1 A520 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational- Cr. 2 s.h. 

Technical Education 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Hecht Room C-310 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint graduate students with the principles 
and philosophy of the various vocational-technical offerings. All federal legislation 
from the Smith-Hughes Act to the present acts are covered as they relate to Distribu- 
tive Education, Home Economics, Trades and Industries, Agriculture, Business Educa- 
tion and related vocations. 

n A522 Advertising Media Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Hecht Room C-310 

This course in advertising offers an opportunity to study in some detail the uses 
of various advertising media such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and direct 
mail, and to evaluate their effectiveness in terms of campaigns. 

1 1 A524 Techniques of Organizing and Administering a Cr. 2 s.h. 

Distributive Education Program 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Hecht Room C-310 

Graduate students will be shown how to set up a Federally reimbursed distribu- 
tive education program according to state and federal guidelines. Class will discuss all 
areas from the initial survey to the steps prior to coordination. Advisory committees, 
physical equipment, organizing and administrating federal adult programs will also be 
covered. 

1 1 A554 Workshop in Problems of Distributive Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Hecht Room C-310 

Intensive analysis of problem-solving in distributive education programs. Discussion 
on individual problems and experiences in teaching and administering distributive edu- 
cation programs. Committee work-seminar method is used. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

15 A404 Supervised Teaching Seminar Cr. 4 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-7:00 Mr. Venturini, Room C-304 

Mr. Bishop, Mr. Cuff 

15 A405 Supervised Teaching Seminar Cr. 4 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-7:00 Staff Room C-304 

This seminar is provided for in-service teachers employed on an emergency or 
provisional certificate and is open to students participating in the "approval" certifica- 
tion program or the Master of Arts in Teaching Program. Arrangements are made 
with the employing Superintendents of Schools for joint supervision of the in-service 
teacher by local school and College officials. The student will assume full teaching 
responsibilities and will meet periodically at the College for a complete academic year. 

In this seminar students have an opportunity to examine their teaching materials 
and techniques and to share their experiences with other beginning teachers. Coop- 
erating local school personnel and supervising instructors assist the new teachers with 
their on-the-job problems. 

(Open to M.A. [major in Teaching] and certification students only.) 

Registration for these courses is closed. This listing is for record purposes only. 

36 Business Studies and Education 



15 A406 Educational Sociology Cr. 3 s.h. 

I'all Section I Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Salt Room C-310 

Fall Section II Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Miss ^lalley Room C-117 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-004 

This course deals with the application of sociological principles to educational 
problems. The school is treated as a part of the community, and the xarious social 
forces that affect the school and its administration are considered. I'he following topics 
are included: family backgrounds, community organization, social breakdown, social 
mobility, socialized classroom methods, and the social approach to individual behavior 
difficulties. 

15 A408 Selection and Utilization of A-V Materials Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-121 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-121 

Sources, selection, and evaluation of audio-visual aids are studied in this course. 
Techniques in developing individual reference catalogs of audio-visual aids are stressed. 
The production of school-made aids is also an important aspect of the course. The use 
of the latest audio-visual equipment is demonstrated. 

15 420 Instructional Innovations Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Bellagamba, Dr. Gorman, Room C-228 

Mr. Venturini 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-011 

This course \\ill attempt by means of indi\idual study, group discussions and 
projects, classroom demonstrations, field trips, and video tapes to acquaint the student 
with the rapidly developing inno\ative practices in teaching. It will be organized on a 
team teaching basis. The following topics will be considered: (1) the teacher and his 
staff — team teaching planning and organization, teacher assistants, and flexible sched- 
uling; (2) independent study — planning and organization, independent study skills, 
and resource centers; (3) technology of instruction — programmed instruction, instruc- 
tional computer programs, teaching machines, microfilms and microfiche, and audio- 
visual de\ices and materials; (4) group dynamics — group relationships and interactions, 
leadership, applications to teaching; (5) currculum adaptations — phasing, cycling, in- 
dividualized instruction; and (6) student evaluations — purposes and practices, instru- 
ment construction, records and reporting. 

15 A421 The School in American Society Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Section I Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Hamel Room H-007 

Fall Section II Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Miss Uhia Room H-007 

Spring Section I Monday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-0I3 

Spring Section II Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-0I3 

This course is concerned w ith the school's functions and roles in .\merican society, 
its relationships with society and go\ernment for ideological, legal, and financial sup- 
port, and the organization and operation of the school as a social institution. It will be 
particularly concerned with the adaptations the school must make for varied social 
phenomena and problems. The study of teaching as a profession will also be included. 

Education 37 



15 A422 The Historical and Philosophical Foundations of Education Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Section I Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Jump Room H-007 

Fall Section II Thursday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-007 

Spring Section I Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-013 

Spring Section II Thursday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-013 

This course will consist of the study of the historical development and philosophical 
foundations of education. It will relate these to currenc educational policies and practices 
in America and abroad, and also to the goals and development of the teacher as a 
professional educator. 



15 A423 Teaching in Urban Schools Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-117 

This course includes: an introduction to the socio-economic setting within which 
the inner-city schools exist; a s^udy of the specific problems which ihe students bring 
to the school because of their family backgrounds; the inner-city system as seen through 
the eyes of administrators, teachers and special personnel (guidance, medical staff, 
specialists in remedial work); recent theories and practices in teaching such students; 
plans and programs ^or change offered by individuals, groups and agencies concerned 
with change; recent innovations in funding; ideas for reorganization of the schools and 
the school systems; and the need for the reorientation of the teachers now in such 
schools. 



15 A431 Individual and Group Dynamics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Miss Talley Room C-309 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-004 

This course is a seminar laboratory experience designed to meet the needs of 
teachers, administrators, and supervisors in the areas of self understanding and effective 
human relationships. Focus is on individual behavior in learning groups and in super- 
visory conferences. Participation in actual group process provides opportunity for devel- 
opment of insight into the effects of one's behavior on others. 



15 A436 Curriculum and Methods in Sex Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Runden Room C-304 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Runden Room C-304 

This is a course in which students will develop curriculums to fit into their 

individual schools. Methods for implementing these curriculums will be demonstrated, 
and current texts and audio-visual materials will be analyzed. 



15 A440 Camping and Outdoor Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room C-226 

The puipose of this course is to familiarize the students with camping and out- 
door education as educational methods util'zed by the schools of America. The aims 
and methods of camping are studied, and consideration is given to the communities 
that have active camping and outdoor education programs in operation. The course 
also helps prepare the student for a position in summer camps. This course is usually 
given at the New Jersey State School of Conservation, Stokes State Forest. 

38 Education 



15 A441 Conservation Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room B-002 

This course is designed to give teachers and prospective teachers a background 
for organizing and teaching conservation on various grade levels. The need for con- 
scr\'ation, the various kinds of natural resources, and some of the modern methods for 
using and renewing these sources are considered. Field trips, laboratory experiences, 
visual aids, printed materials, and visiting specialists combine to make this a useful 
introductory course for all teachers. 

15 A445 Developing Curriculum Guides and Materials for Cr. 2 s.h. 

Environmental Education Programs 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room S-102 

Techniques and procedures for the development of curriculum guides and ma- 
terials for teaching environmental education and conservation are the goals for the 
course. Emphasis will be placed upon each student's developing materials which may 
be put into use in his local school program. The course will deal with the selection, 
production and utilizat'on of audio-visual materials related to outdoor education. Tech- 
niques of producing and constructing teaching aids will be demonstrated. Educational 
materials a\ailable from education and commercial sources will be surveyed. 

15 A451 Guidance for the Classroom Teacher Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mrs. Gaeng Room H-008 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room H-OIl 

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of guidance for teachers who 
are concerned with problems of guidance and human relations in the classroom. This 
course is also designed to give the new teacher a picture of the place of guidance in 
the modern school to indicate what guidance is and what it is not, to indicate the tech- 
niques by which guidance is accomplished and to identify some of the tools of the 
guidance counselor. (Cannot be used for credit toward the Master's degree in Student 
Personnel Ser\'ices.) 

15 A461 The Junior High School Curriculum Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Cuff Room C-321 

Recent trends in the development of the junior high school curriculum and the 
relation of the curriculum to the aims function, and organization of the junior high 
school are covered. Curriculum patterns in representative junior high schools are 
studied and evaluated. An opportunity is given to each student to develop units of 
work for junior high school subjects in the major of his choice. 

15 A492 Comparative Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall ITiursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Gorman Room C-301 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Peckham Room C-305 

The educational systems of certain selected countries of Europe, Asia, Africa, 
and Latin America are studied in an attempt to gain insight into the essential qualities 
of American education. In this process the relationship between the educational system 
of each culture and its hisiory, economy, and political and social organization should 
emerge. Factors causing progress and change in education since 1900 are obser\ed. 

15 A501 Tests and Measurements in Secondary Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 10:^^0-12:10 Dr. Lang Room C-310 

Spring Saturday 10:30-12:10 Dr. Lang Room C-310 

The purpose of this course is to develop an appreciation of the meaning and 
importance of measurement in education, and to give a working knowledge of instru- 
ments of measurement. 

Education 39 



15 A503 Methods and Instruments of Research 

Fall Section I Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Heiss 

Fall Section II Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Lang 

Fall Section III Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Heiss 

Fall Section IV Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Lang 

Fall Section V Saturday 8:30-10:10 Dr. Lang 

Spring Section I Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Lang 

Spring Section II Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Heiss 

Spring Section III Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Heiss 

Spring Section IV Thursday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Heiss 

Spring Section V Saturday 8:30-10:10 Dr. Lang 



Cr. 


2 s.h. 


Room 


B-002 


Room 


C-309 


Room 


B-002 


Room 


C-309 


Room C-309 


Room B-005 


Room B-005 


Room 


C-309 


Room 


C-309 


Room 


C-310 



The purpose is to introduce students of education to research and its practical 
application to professional problems. The course treats: the nature and types of edu- 
cational research; methods and techniques of educational research; and the tools used 
in interpreting statistical data. During the course, the student completes his outline 
and may complete his research either in this course, in Education 603, or in his depart- 
mental seminar or research course. It is recommended that this course be taken rather 
early in the graduate program. It must precede work in departmental seminar or 
research courses. Prerequisite: Math. 320, Educ. 501, or equivalent, and M.A. can- 
didacy. Math. 320 does not carry graduate credit. 



15 A504 "Action Research" for Teachers 



Cr. 3 s.h. 



Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Lang Room C-310 

This course is designed to provide teachers with an understanding of the basic 
principles and techniques of research which are applicable to their classroom situa- 
tions. Examples of various kinds of classroom research, both of an individual and 
group nature, are studied and analyzed. Practice is provided in the planning and out- 
lining of specific research projects, the development of experimental designs, and 
the evaluation of the structure and outcomes of classroom research. Each student 
develops, in detail a plan for a research project which he might be interested in under- 
taking in his own classroom. 

(Open to M.A. [major in Teaching] and certification students onlv.) Formerly 
15:595G. 



15 A505 The Two Year College Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Merlo Room S-102 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the history, purposes, pat- 
terns, and trends of the two-year college, including the junior college, the community 
college, and university extension centers. 



15 A509 Medical Problems in Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Williams Room C-228 

In this course the role of the educator is studied in relation to the following 
subject areas: childhood, chronic and contagious diseases; nutritional problems; narcotics; 
and psycho-socio-medical pathologies. The impact of health problems on the family, 
school, and community is emphasized throughout. 



40 Education 



15 A510 Introduction to Educational Administration Cr. 2 s.h. 

Kail Section I Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Mosicr Room B-004 

Fall Section II Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Mosicr Room B-004 

Spring Section I Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Mosicr Room 11-004 

Spring Section II Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Mosicr Room C-301 

This is the basic course in the organization and administration of the American 
school system at the national, state, intermediate, and local levels. The purj5oses and 
nature of school administration are studied. Other topics sur\'eyed include: the supcr- 
intendency, personnel problems, records and reports, plant administration, business 
administration, auxiliary services, administration of curriculum, instruction, guidance, 
and pupil personnel. Prerequisite: One and one half years successful tcacliing ex- 
perience under certification. 

15 A5n School Business Administration Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Mcrlo Room S-102 

Topics considered in this course include: the role of business administration in 
public education, office management, budgetar}' procedures, financial accounting, payroll 
administration, purchase and supply problems, insurance, debt service management, 
transportation, and food service. Prerequisite: Educ. 510 or equi\alent. 

15 A514 School Law Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Merlo Room S-102 

After an introductory general study of such topics as: legal theory-, the separation 
of school government from other local gosernment, the appellate function of the State 
Commissioner of Education and the State Board of Education, the course is concerned 
principally with a study of New Jersey school laws (Title 18 of the Revised Statutes) 
and decisions. Prerequisite: Educ. 510 or equivalent. 

15 A516 School Finance Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:50-9:10 Dr. xMerlo Room S-102 

After an introductor)- unit concerned with the current economic cnxironment, 
this course is devoted to a study of state and local taxation, state school-aid theory 
and practice, school-district indebtedness, cost-quality relationships. Federal aid, fiscal 
controls, and the budgetary' process. Prerequisite: Educ. 510 or equivalent. 

15 A520 Administration of the Modern Secondary School Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Section I Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Bcllagamba Room C-228 

Fall Section II Wedne^lay 7:30-9:10 Dr. Peckham Room C-301 

Spring Section I Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room S-101 

Spring Section II Thursday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room S-102 

The following topics are considered: the student personnel, building and revising 
the high school curriculum, providing for individual differences, making the school 
schedule, records, the guidance program, pupil participation in government, the extra- 
curricular program, the health program, the safety program, discipline, library and 
study hall, cafeteria, the principal's office, and evaluating results. Prerequisite: Fduc. 
510 or equivalent. 

15 A525 Secondary School Building Planning Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Merlo Room S-102 

This course deals with the education planning of secondary-school buildings. The 
preparation of educational specifications and space requirements is considered. Topics 
considered include the planning of offices, classrooms, auditoriums, gymnasiums, 
laboratories, shops, libraries, cafeterias, and other spaces. Prerequisites: Educ. 520, 
530 or equivalents. 

Education 41 



15 A530 Curriculum Construction in the Secondary School Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Salt Room B-004 

SpTing Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Salt Room S-101 

The purpose of this course is to consider the extent to which the secondary school 
curriculum meets the needs of a changing civilization, and to consider effective means 
of curriculum construction. Prerequisite: One and one half years successful teaching 
experience under certification. 

15 A531 Middle School Curriculum and Organization Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Cuff Room S-101 

The emerging curriculum of the rapidly developing middle school is explored. 
Attention is given to the organization of pupils, instruction, media, and facilities. The 
influences of recent social changes and educational innovations are emphasized. Stu- 
dents have opportunities to study practices in typical middle schools and to develop 
instructional strategies. 

15 A532 Principles of Curriculum Development Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Section I Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room B-004 

Fall Section II Saturday 8:30-10:10 Mr. Salt Room C-310 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Salt Room C-113 

This course directs the student in the study of the philosophic, social and eco- 
nomic forces in our society that have determined and will determine the pattern of 
curriculum in American education in the American public schools from K-12 grades. 

It reviews the accepted manner of designing such curricula and what professional 
bodies and individuals play leading roles in the process of curriculum design. It brings 
to the attention of the student the close connection of community interest and power 
structures in society which must be related to the professional decisions. In this course 
the curriculum is considered as a continuous and changing process which reflects the 
goals and processes of a democratic society. 

15 A533 Philosophy of Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Haas Room B-004 

This course acquaints advanced students of education with the main currents of 
philosophical thought tending to direct education since the turn of the century. It builds 
a thorough understanding of the James, Peirce, Dewey positions and their critics and 
interpreters through the 1930's and 1940's. Post war European and American thought 
as expressed in philosophy, arts, including literature will aid the student to interpret 
and weigh contemporary trends and discussions of personal and social values, mainly 
as they influence American education. 

15 A535 The Teaching of Communication Skills Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Mrs. Ward Room C-301 

The role of communication skills is of major importance in the learning process. 
Every teacher should be aware of the abilities, limitations, and needs of students in 
this area, the adaptations that must be made in curricula, assignments, and classroom 
procedures to the levels of the students in a classroom, and the remedial measures that 
might be taken to improve their status. These communication skills include the spe- 
cific areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Instructors from the departments 
of Speech, Reading, and English are involved in this course. The endeavor is made to 
have the students gain an understanding of the basic principles in each of these fields 
and their relationship to the teaching of any subject. 

(Open to M.A. [major in Teaching] and certification students only.) Formerly 
15 595H. 

42 Education 



15 A540 Supervision of Instruction Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Section I Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Peckhani Room C-321 

Fall Section II Thursday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Cuff Room H-004 

Spring Huirsday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room H-004 

This course covers the principles and techniques of supervij-ion used in elementary 
and secondary schools. It describes the role of the supervisor in aiding teachers to 
adjust to the school environment, and ovcTconic certain personal weaknesses that lower 
their effectiveness in the classroom. It alerts the student to ways of challenging teachers 
to new and more varied improvements in teaching methods. It also describes the 
problem of organizing and administering curriculum changes. The stress is on creating 
a professional atmosphere of growth for all concerned with instruction. Prerequisite: 
One and one half years successful teaching experience under certification. 



15 A541 Supervision in Special Fields Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Section I Tuesday, 5:00-6:40 Staff Room C-305 

Spring Section II Thursday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room H-011 

This course directs the student to the special problems of supervision in a particular 
subject area at the secondary school level, or to the problems of general supervision at 
the secondary or elementary school level. Where special supervision activities relating 
to age groups, materials of instruction, or professional growth and evaluation are unique 
for the subject area, specialists in these fields will be used as instructors. (Supervision 
courses offered in other departments may be substituted for Ed. 541.) Prerequisite: 
One and one half years successful teaching experience under certification. 



15 A550 Guiding the Reading Interests of Secondary Students Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 ^ Miss Schantz Room C-109 

The purpose of this course is to prepare teachers to discover and impro\e the 
reading interests and attitudes of their students. Useful to all content area teachers 
and specialists who assign recreational and research reading, the first part of this 
course deals with fundamental bibliographical tools, the classroom teacher's relation- 
ship to the library, current source materials in book evaluation, and techniques for 
determining book selection. In the second part the teachers write their own book 
annotations and reviews, establish rcadabilitv and suitability criteria based on a grow- 
ing knowledge of child development, help build collections and services for young 
people which meet their personal needs through reading. 



15 A551 Organization and Administration of Reading Programs Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room C-109 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more complex aspects 
of organizing and administering reading programs. It includes such topics as: theor\' 
and techniques of leadership, program development, organization of in-service pro- 
grams, developing a budget, methods of evaluation, etc. In general, this course is 
aimed at providing essential background for reading specialists to establish or ad- 
minister a functional secondar)' school reading program. 

Education 43 



III 



15 A552 Principles of Reading Improvement in the Secondary Cr. 2 s.n. 

School 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Ward Room C-109 

This is a course planned to present a deeper picture of the guiding principles 
and controversial issues which influence the teaching and learning of reading. Or- 
ganized especially for the subject area teacher and the beginning reading specialist, 
recent non-clinical research and important professional and lay journals are studied 
to explore the pendulum of theory and practice in: the organization and administra- 
tion of developmental reading programs, educational policies which affect reading, 
child development concepts and reading growth, systematic differentiation of indi- 
vidual needs, and reappraisal of the place of reading in our changing society. (Not 
open to those who have taken Educ. 556.) 

15 A553 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Cr. 2 s.h. 

Secondary School 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Brunner Room C-109 

This is a practical course dealing with popular techniques useful in the improve- 
ment of non-clinical reading difficulties found in the content subjects. Planned 
especiallly for the subject area teacher and the beginning reading specialist, a study is 
made of secondary school reading needs, and specific suggestions are outlined for 
guiding the slow, average, and gifted student to success in reading up to his capacity 
in a classroom situation. Through an actual study of the more widely used reading 
workbooks, films, slides, tachitoscopic instruments, and texts available in the Reading 
Laboratory facilities, a practical approach is made to building repertoire of reading skills 
in many areas. (Not open to those who have taken Educ. 430 and 557.) 

15 A554 Case Studies of Reading Difficulties: Part I, Testing Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Miss Baker Room C-109 

This is the basic course in learning the techniques that may be used to diagnose 
reading difficulties. After making a thorough study of the most frequently used tests 
and inventories, each teacher applies this knowledge to the actual testing of a child 
with reading problems. Particular attention is given to the unique values of group 
and individual tests, survey and diagnostic tests, and standardized and informal tests. 
Practice in case reporting to parents, schools and agencies is undertaken. 

15 A555 Case Studies of Reading Diflficulties: Part II, Treatment Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-9:10 Miss Baker Room C-109 

In Part II emphasis is placed on the techniques and treatment which can be 
effectively applied by the a\'erage classroom teacher, thereby, greatly increasing the 
effectiveness of their diagnostic procedures. Teachers who are conscious of the types 
of difficulties that children encounter in their school work can do much by "preventive" 
teaching. 

15 A556 Corrective and Remedial Reading: Part I, Causation Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 4:00-6:30 Miss Schantz Room C-109 

15 A557 Corrective and Remedial Reading: Part II, Treatment Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 4:00-6:30 Miss Schantz Room C-109 

These are causation and treatment courses planned for the teacher and specialist 
who are involved in some aspect of remedial instruction in reading improvement. Part I 
offers an opporunity to extend training by investigation and interpretation of the more 
serious reading problems. A study is made of the constellation of causes of reading 
difficulties, and techniques of remedial and corrective treatment are projected. In Part II 
particular attention is paid to the selection and adaptation of suitable improvement 
devices and curriculum materials. Illustrative cases are drawn from actual clinical experi- 
ences by requiring participation in the program of the Reading Laboratory. (Educ. 556 
not open to those who have taken Educ. 530A, 558; Educ. 557 not open to those who 
have taken Educ. 530B and 559.) Prerequisite: Permission is needed to take these 
courses. 

44 Education 



cialii 
Part 
molt 

Part 11 

tip 

;etlies« 



15 A558 Field Experience in Reading Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall (To be arranged) Miss Schantz Room C-107 

Spring (To be arranged) Miss Scliantz Room C-107 

The aim of the course is to introduce the student to various aspects of reading 
through experience in agencies actually dealing with such problems. Students obser\e 
and participate in activities of the agencies to which they are assigned and write full 
accounts of these observations and experiences. Prerequisites are: experience in teach- 
ing, familiarity with literature on all aspects of reading and psychology, Education 552, 
and permission of instructor. The hours for the conferences are arranged personally by 
student and instructor. 



15 A560 Historical and Philosophical Development Cr. 3 s.h. 

of Adult-Continuing Education 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Gambacorta Room H-004 

The identification of historical, philosophical, psychological and sociological bases 
upon which foundation present-day adult continuing education is built in the United 
States. An historic perspective will be utilized to provide opportunity for the student 
to develop a working philosophy of program planning in adult continuing education. 
Selected areas of presentation \\'ill be made by nationally recognized experts in the 
adult continuing education field. 



15 A561 Principles and Problems in Adult-Continuing Cr. 3 s.h. 

Education Program Development 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Ast Room H-012 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the working principles and 
current practices in the education of adults in public school systems, business and 
industry, government, voluntary organizations, home-study organizations and in non- 
credit programs of higher educational institutions. 



15 A577 Social Case Work Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Williams Room B-003 

This course reviews principles in social case \\ork as they relate to the school 
Jetting. Study is devoted to the theoretical development of social work norms, and 
to the function and role of the school social worker (visiting teacher). Cases which 
lave been developed by Social Workers will be studied and experiences in a school 
etting will be provided. 



5 A578 Testing and Evaluation in Student Personnel Services Cr. 3 s.h. 

all Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Gelfond Room B-003 

This course deals with fundamentals of educational and psychological measure- 
ents in guidance: test theory, statistical concepts, test construction, evaluation and 
interpretation. The place of tests in the instructional program is stressed. 



i 



Education 45 



15 A579 The Use of Tests in Counseling Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Gelfond Room S-102 

This course is designed to familiarize Elementary and Secondary school counselors 
with techniques for using test results; for interpreting test results to teachers, administra- 
tors, parents and students. Implicit in this course will be the use of appropriate statistical 
analysis to draw conclusions for research and program development. Laboratory tech- 
niques will be used to give students practical opportunities to administer, score, and 
interpret a group of tests. Some time will be devoted to the planning of the testing 
program for the Elementary and the Secondary School, Prerequisite: Ed. 578, or 
equivalent. 

15 A580 Principles of Guidance Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Section 1 Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Castens Room B-003 

Fall Section II Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Kenyon Room B-003 

Spring Section I Monday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room B-003 

Spring Section II Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room B-003 

Topics included in this course cover: philosophy of guidance, history of the 
guidance movement, the need for guidance presented by children and adolescents. The 
methods of gathering useful data are studied, and school records, exploratory activities, 
tests, inventories, the case study approach, occupational information, and occupational 
data are treated as well as general methods of guidance with special stress on inter- 
viewing and counseling of students. 

15 A582 Vocational Guidance Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room B-004 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Kenyon Room B-003 

This course is intended for counselors in the junior and senior high schools to 
obtain information about the principles and philosophy of vocational education and 
the techniques of counseling youths who wish to receive pre-employment training, and 
for counselors of out-of-school groups who are attempting to make readjustments to 
occupational life. Attention is also given to guidance techniques for job preparation and 
readjustment, the matching of educational and personal abilities to job specifications, 
the effects of social legislation on the employment of youths, and a study of techniques 
used in determining occupational needs and occupational changes. Prerequisite: Educ. 
580. 

15 A583 Educational Guidance Cr. 3 s.h.ii 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Davis Room B-003' 

This course is concerned with the facilities available for education after high- 1 
school graduation, the problem of further training for pupils leaving school before 
completing high school, and the academic problems of students while in school. A 
brief survey of colleges and college-admission procedure is made. Prerequisite: Educ. 580. 

15 A585 Group Guidance and Counselling Activities Cr. 3 s.h 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Gregg Room B-00? 

Spring Section I Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room B-004 

Spring Section II Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Gregg Room B-00^ 

This course is concerned with the various techniques for helping 3 individua 
pupils and for using group activities including role-playing as a guidance technique 
The group activities considered include those of home rooms, activity periods, occu 
pation courses, student field trips, placement follow-ups, college nights, and caree 
days. Prerequisite: Educ. 580. 

46 Education 



15 A586 Elementary School Guidance Services Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Or. Gelfond Room B-003 

This course is designed for guidance counselors in the public schools with par- 
ticular emphasis on the guidance services that may be offered in grades kindergarten 
through six. llie guidance program, as established in the public schools, envisions 
supervision and administration of the guidance program from the kindergarten through 
graduation at grade twelve. It is important, therefore, that the guidance director under- 
stands the ser\ices that can be made available to the elementary school. Prerequisite: 
Educ. 580. 

15 A587 Administration and Supervision of Guidance Programs Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Gregg Room B-OOl 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with more complex aspects of the 
super\'ision and administration of a guidance program. It includes such topics as: 
developing and administering programs of student registration (course selection); theory 
and techniques of scheduling a modern high school; supervisory responsibilities of the 
director of guidance within and outside of the department; coordinating guidance 
activities in a multi-school district, etc. In general, this course is aimed at providing 
essential background for counselors desiring to establish or administer a guidance pro- 
gram in a high school or a multi-school system. 

The primar)' method of study is the examination and evaluation of current guidance 
practices leading to the formation of proposals for improvement, and possible inclu- 
sion, in guidance programs where the student is working as a counselor and ^or director. 
Prerequisite: Education 580 and 6 s.h. in the Guidance Program of the Student Per- 
sonnel Services M.A. Degree program. 



15 A588 Techniques of Interviewing and Counselling Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Gregg Room B-003 

Spring Section I Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Gregg Room B-003 

Spring Section II Thursday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room B-003 

lliis is an advanced techniques course in the counseling of individual students. 
The directive, non-directive, client-centered, and role playing approaches, as well as 
the case study methods are studied. Opportunity for demonstration and practice with 
these techniques are implemented with tape recordings, one way screens, and closed 
circuit television. Prerequisites: 12 s.h. of work in the M.A. program and permission of 
E<1* the faculty advisor. 



kifl 



15 A589 Student Personnel Services in Higher Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Davis Room B-OOl 

This course is a study of the student personnel functions in two-year and four- 
year colleges. The areas to be included are: personal counseling, financial aid, dormitory- 



management, health program, student activities and social programs; course selection, 
job placement, college admission and academic retention, administration and super- 



vision or tne program. 








Students whose program 


requires the 


15 


595 Series please note: 


15 A595A & B 


replaced b\ 




15 A422 


15 A595C 


replaced by 




15 A421 


15 A595D 


replaced by 




Departmental Methods 


15 A595E & F 


replaced b\' 




15 A404 & 405 


n A595 G 


replaced ])\ 




15 A504 


15 A595H 


replaced by 




15 A535 



Education 47 



15 A601E Workshop in Education: Psychology-Sex Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Runden Room C-304 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Runden Room C-304 

A workshop-lecture course in which eminent psychologists, health educators, 
religious leaders, sociologists, biologists, physicians, and media specialists will lec- 
ture and participate in group discussions. Topics emphasized will be: sex education 
in the home, marriage and family relations, genetics, birth control, sex and religion, 
developmental psychology and the sex role, sex and the self-concept. 

15 A602 Research Seminar in Guidance Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Gelfond & Dr. Davis Room B-004 

This course is designed to provide a laboratory situation for the exploration and 
study of present practices in student personnel work. The major portion of time is 
spent in private investigation and research. Prerequisite: Education 580, 503 and 10 
semester hours graduate work in the Student Personnel Services Program. 

15 A603 Principles and Practices of Research Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room C-309 

The purpose of this course is to give students an opportunity to collect, analyze, 
and interpret data; to state the findings; to draw conclusions and generalizations; to 
write a research report together with an abstract; and to give an oral report. 

This is an elective course in educational research. It may be substituted for a 
departmental research seminar upon the approval of both the departmental advisor and 
the chairman of the Education Department. 

15 A604 Field Work in Guidance Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall (To be arranged) Dr. Davis & Dr. Gelfond 

Spring (To be arranged) Dr. Davis & Dr. Gelfond 

The aim of the course is to introduce the student to various aspects of guidance 
through experience in agencies actually dealing with such problems. Students obser\'e 
and participate in activities of the agencies to which they are assigned and write full 
accounts of these observations and experiences. Some time is spent in discussing and 
evaluating these experiences and relating them to the literature of the subject. Pre- 
requisite: Education 580 and 10 semester hours graduate work in the Student Personnel 
Services program. 

15 A605 Research Seminar in School Social Work (Visiting Teacher) Cr. 2 s.h. 
Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Williams Room B-005 

This course will provide research tools to enable the student to construct and im- 
plement an original inquiry that shall be deemed by the instructor to be a singular 
contribution to the field. (Prerequisite: Ed. 503.) 

15 A607 Field Work in School Social Work Cr. 2 sh 

Fall (To be arranged) Dr. Williams 

Spring (To be arranged) Dr. Williams 

The student will be provided with an opportunity to participate in school social 
work in an actual school situation. Diagnostic skills, interviewing techniques, case 
recordings, individual and group therapy and the team approach will be observed and 
discussed. Under the guidance of a certified, experienced school social worker, the 
student will develop an understanding of the use of community resources. The student 
will be given an opportunity to observe special services (school social worker, psy 
chologist, psychiatrist, speech or reading specialist, and teacher) in action as togethei 
a therapeutic plan is developed for the school pupil. i 

48 Education 



15 A610 The Personnel Services Team Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Davis Room B-OOl 

This is a core course designed to establish the philosophy, membership, roles, 
and functions of the various services that compose the Student Personnel Services Team. 

15 A628 Field Experience in Administration and Supervision Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall (To be arranged) Dr. Peckham 

Spiing (To be arranged) Dr. Peckham 

Students are assigned to a particular junior or senior high school, where under 
the guidance of a school administrator or supervisor they carry out certain functions 
of these positions. A college staff member acts as coordinator and supervisor of this 
activity by visiting the school and consulting with the student, obserxing him in action 
and plans with the school personnel for improvement and e\'aluation of the student's 
work. 



15 A629 Research Seminar in Secondary School Administration Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Peckham Room C-321 

In this course the class makes an intensive study of administrative and supervisory 
problems suggested by the educational events and trends of the year, by the interests 
and responsibilities of the members of the class, and by educational movements in New 
Jersey and the country. Each represents advanced \\ork which depends upon previous 
study or experience in educational administration or supervision. Prerequisites: Educ. 
503, 520 and 540 or equivalents. 



15 A639 Research Seminar in Curriculum Development Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Salt Room C-309 

This course is for students actively engaged in problems of curriculum reconstruc- 
tion and for those who are anticipating committee work in this field. It concerns both 
the elementary and secondary le\'els. Each student does an indi\idual piece of research 
which he reports to the class. Tliis represents advanced work which depends on previous 
^tudy in the curriculum area. Prerequisite: Educ. 503, 530 or 538. 



loolsot 



1 



15 A659 Research Seminar in Reading Cr. 2 s.h. 

pring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Miss Schantz Room C-I09 

The course is designed to provide a laboratory situation for the exploration and 

tudy of problems in the field of reading that have been suggested by the educational 

fevents and trends of the year, by the interests and responsibilities of the members of 

he class, and by educational movements in New Jersey, the country, and the world. 

ach student will execute an indi\idual research effort which he reports to the class. 



15 A678 Techniques of Evaluation Cr. 3 s.h. 

spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Gelfond Room B-005 

Ihis is a core course designed to assure adequate background in the design, use, 
nd interpretation of statistical evidence. 

1 Education 49 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

20 A105 Composition and Literature I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room B-004 

Fall Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-310 

Spring Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room C-319 

Spring Sec.II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-319 

Reading selected literary works from different periods and cultures to provide 
basis for principles and methods of expository writing; a substantial number of writing 
assignments required to provide practice in both composition and hterary analysis. 

20 A106 Composition and Literature II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room C-224 

Fall Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-012 

Spring Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room C-224 

Spring Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-224 

Skills developed in 20 105 utilized in criticizing representative selections of 
literature typifying the major cultural epochs of the Western world, studied in 

chronological order. In addition to frequent written exercises, a research paper dealing 
with some aspect of the literature is required. 

20 A124 Literature and Sociology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday & Wednesday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-224 

Literary works as both mirror and criticism of their society, through the insights 
of sociiologists from Comte to Riesman. Individual works are grouped in the following 
emphases: individuals vs. communal values, class conflict, conformity and protest, 
relationship between literary type and social structure. 

20 A223 Myth and Literature Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday & Wednesday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-224 

Selected primitive and classical myths are studied comparatively with emphasis; 
on some of the major motifs and archetypes. Selected literary works are analyzed td 
illustrate how myth and myth-making process function in the literary work of art) 
Theories about the origin of myths are considered. 

20 A225 Early American Literature Cr. 3 s.K 

Fall Tuesday & Thursday 6:30-7:45 Staff Room H-Ol" 

American literature from the Puritans to Cooper, designed to trace the develop! 
ment of Colonial and Revolutionary thought and the beginning of America's mov^' 
for cultural independence. 

20 A226 Literature of the American Renaissance Cr. 3 s.lj 

Spring Tuesday & Thursday 6:30-7:45 Staff Room C-22J 

The major works of the masters of the American Romantic period: Emersoi 
Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman, Poe. 

20 A361 The English Novel to 1900 Cr. 3 s. 

Fall Monday & Wednesday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room B-0( 

From Defoe to Cary, the most eminent British novelists will be read, analyzed \ 
to form and theme, and judged in the light of literary, social, moral, and cultuij 
criteria. 

50 English 



20 A419 The English Language— History and Grammar- 
Linguistics II Cr. 3 s.li. 
Fall Thursday 7:50-10:00 Mr. Rcaskc Room B-OOl 
Review of traditional Eiiglrh grammar; introduction to new theories of grammar 
being developed through linguistic approaches; various teaching methods for utilizing 
"new" grammar on the secondary level. Prerequisite: 20:418. 

20 A437 Victorian Prose anci Poetry Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday & Wednesday 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-321 

Mid- and late nineteenth centur\' responses to the emergence of modem British 
society through the prose writings of Carlyle, J. S. Mill, Ruskin, T. H. Huxley, New- 
man, Arnold and Morris; major emphasis in poetry on the work of Tennyson, Browning, 
and Arnold. 

20 A454 Film and Society Cr. 3 s.h 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Earley Room V-155 

Film studied as art form, social force, educational device, entertainment medium; 
history of motion pictures, film techniques, scenario as literary type, numerous films 
shown as illustrative. 

20 A510 Wordsworth and Coleridge Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Grieco Room B-004 

Verse and prose; the main currents of poetry, philosophy, and religion; con- 
temporary scholarship concerning the two authors. 

20 ASllA Literary Criticism to 1800 Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 2:00-4:30 Dr. Hanson Room L-108 

Influential critics from Greek and Roman through the Medieval, Renaissance, 
and Neo-classic periods. 

20 519A Myth: Origin and Development Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 xMrs. Barrett Room S-102 

Selected world mythologies synthesized against the theories of Frazer, Harrison, 
Freud, Campbell, Cassirer, Neumann, Jung and others; emphasis on myth as repre- 
sentative of the origin of all human knowledge and disciplines, and especially on myth 
and ritual in its relationship to the development and understanding of the literature 
arts and the creative process. 

20 A523 William Blake Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Saturday 10:30-1:00 Dr. Schwegcl Room B-226 

A close study of the poetn,- of William Blake from the Poetical Sketches and 

Songs of Innocence and E.xpcrience through the Prophetic Books; special emphasis on 

the interplay between the visual and verbal manifestations of Blake's art, his political 
and philosophical ideas, archetypal symbols and Biblical analogues in his work, and 
his poetr\- as a microcosm of Romanticism. 

20 A526B Theory of Drama Cr. 3 s.h. 

I'all Saturday 8:30-11:00 Mr. Pettegrove Room B-002 

Significant writings about drama from Aristotle to the present; emphasis on the 
modern period, from Ibsen to Eric Bentley and Arthur Miller. 

English 51 



20 A529 Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Healey Room B-005 

Three of the transcendental mainstream. 

20 A535C Fielding, Smollett, Sterne Cr. 3 s.h 

Fall Saturday 8:30-11:00 Dr. Radner Room B-005 

Development of the novel from beginnings through the eighteenth century; con- 
centration on major novelists; minor novelists fitted into study. 

20 A537 American Drama 1920-1945 Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. McGee Room C-226 

Selected works by such playwrights as O'Neill, Maxwell Anderson, Elmer Rice, 
Robert E. Sherwood, Lillian Hellman, Clifford Odets, George S. Kaufman, Moss Hart, 
and Thornton Wilder. 

20 A540 Yeats, Eliot, and Pound Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Rich Room H-011 

The works of the three figures who most influenced poetry in English in the 
Twentieth Century. 

20 A544B Shakespeare, Comedies Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Bohn Room B-005 

Development as a writer of comedy; masterful understanding of the function of 
comedy; variety of situations and characters exhibiting this function; critical approaches; 
stage history. 

20 A547 The Twentieth Century American Novel Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Healey Room H-014 

Sinclair, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Lewis, Hemingway, Faulkner, Steinbeck, and Cather. 

20 A603 English Research Writing Cr. 3 s.h. 
Spring Saturday 8:30-11:00 Mr. Roberts Room C-309 

An exercise in original research using the routines and techniques of the English 
field. 

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

21 AlOO Fundamentals of Speech Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room K-129 
Fall Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room K-129 
Spring Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room K-129 
Spring Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room K-129 

Effective voice production and clear, pleasing diction are developed through 
speech activities. The work is adapted to individual needs as revealed by recordings 
and diagnostic tests. The work may include prescribed additional practice in the 
speech laboratory. Failure to achieve an acceptable standard of performance results in 
the withholding of credit until the student demonstrates satisfactorv achievement. 

21 A106 Introduction to Oral Interpretation Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday & Thursday 6:30-7:45 Staff Room K-129 

This course is organized to increase the student's appreciation of literature in 
the area of his special interest. The emphasis is on individual classroom performances 
followed by informal critiques, and the development of a repertory for specific class- 
room purposes. 

52 English and Speech 



21 A204 Fundamentals of Public Speaking Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday & Wednesday 6:30-7:45 Staff Room K-129 

The student studies techniques for preparing and dehvering effective informative, 
persuasive, and entertaining speeches. He is given several opportunities to address the 
class and enter into formal critiques, as well as moderate one program. 

21 A438 Creative Dramatics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 10:30-12:10 Dr. Rockwood Room K230 

The purpose of this course is to study the principles and techniques of creative 
dramatics as they may be applied in the classroom, theater, and speech therapy program. 
Major emphasis is placed on materials for dramatization paraellcling the mental, physi- 
cal, and emotional levels of children in grades kindergarten through eight. Application 
of these techniques with high school students is also considered. The philosophy of 
creativity is discussed, and attention is given to the integration of the arts with the 
total educational picture. The course includes a workshop in which members of the 
class plan and carr\' out creative activities with children. 



21 A441 Theater History: Restoration to Modern Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. McElroy Room K-230 

Tliis course is designed to extend to the student a comprehensive view of the 
development of the theater from the Restoration through the modern period. Special 
attention is placed upon plays and playwrights, theater architecture, scenery, costum- 
ing, styles of acting and presentation of the period. Course work includes oral reports, 
lectures, and classroom demonstrations. 



21 A449 Advanced Public Speaking Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Ballare Room K-230 

This is an advanced course in the theory and practice of public speaking. It pro- 
vides opportunities for further training in more complex speech skills, especially in 
persuasive speaking, and conducting a meeting. Prerequisite: Sp. 204 or the equivalent. 



21 A511 Aphasia and Related Language Disorders in Adults Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Attanasio Room K-230 

APHASIA: Etiology, diagnosis, and therapy for congenital and for sustained 
linguistic disorders associated with psychomotor problems. Emphasis on holistic and 
on team approaches to therapy. 



21 A531 Advanced Audiology Cr. 3 sh. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Dunlap Room K-230 

The purpose of this course is to increase skill in administering tests for determhi- 
ing pure-tone and speech reception thrcshholds. Emphasis is placed on evaluation and 
interpretation of test results and on the analysis of client histories. Principles and tech- 
niques of hearing aid evaluation, measurement of recruitment, and tests for psychogenic 
deafness and malingering are studied. Consideration is also given to pre- and post- 
surgical audiometry, and to the special problems of differential diagnosis in testing 
children. Prerequisite: 60 clincal hours in speech practicum. 

Speech 53 



21 A532 Practicum in Speech or Hearing Rehabilitation Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room K-230 

This course provides advanced students with the opportunities for the practical 
application of diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques with children and adults who 
have major speech and language problems. Qualified students participate in specialized 
laboratory experiences which include planning and supervising speech thereapy sessions, 
providing rehabilitative services to individuals and small groups, interviewing applicants, 
and administering audiometric tests. Prerequisite: 60 clinical hours in speech practicum. 



21 A563 Scenery Design and Construction Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. MacConnell Room K-230 

This course is designed to extend the advanced speech student's knowledge in 
scenery design and construction techniques. Special emphasis is placed upon stage 
design as related to the play, the director, and the audience. The course of study includes 
a survey of the styles of design and the use of the perspective sketch and stage model 
in planning the stage setting. The application of stage construction techniques is used 
to demonstrate the necessity of scene design in planning the stage production. Each 
student is expected to design and plan the construction of scenery for a play appropriate 
for production in a secondary school. 



21 A565 Advanced Oral Interpretation Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Ballare Room K-230 

This course is designed to provide further study of techniques in interpretation of 
poetry and prose. Extensive practice is provided in the analysis and presentation of 
various types of literary material (short story, ballad, narrative, sonnet, etc.) suitable 
for use in the classroom and for special programs. Prerequisite: Sp. 106 or equivalent. 



21 A582 Stuttering Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Caracciolo Room K-230 

Principles and methods of speech therapy with children who stutter are studied. 
Methods of evaluation, specific techniques of speech therapy, and principles coordinat- 
ing speech therapy with home and with school life will be the focus of this practical 
course. Demonstrations with children who stutter will serve as the basis for study and 
discussion. 



21 A592X Areas and Techniques of Research in 

Speech and Dramatics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Leight Room K-230 

Methods of research appropriate for studies in speech are analyzed. Significant 
problems in the field are investigated and discussed, and published research projects are 
evaluated. Special attention is given to the problems of locating and utilizing profes- 
sional journals and other publications for research. Each student is required to prepare 
an outline for a research project, to develop a bibliography, to complete the research, 
and to submit a formal report of the project. 



54 Speech 






FINE ARTS 






Cr. 3 s.h. 


DeLccuw 


Room L-229 


DeLceuw 


Room L-229 



DEPARTMENT OF 

24 A100 Introduction to the Visual Arts 

Fall Tuesday 6:30-10:00 Mr. 

Spring Tuesday 6:30-10:00 Mr. 

This course is required of all students except those majoring in fine arts. The ways 
in which man has expressed himself in the many forms of the visual arts including paint- 
ing, ceramics, sculpture, weaving, print making, architecture, the theater, motion pic- 
tures, and photography, are explored through studio work, demonstrations by artists 
and craftsmen, reading, discussion, and trips to art sources. Emphasis is placed upon 
their significance to the individual, and their role in a culture. 

24 A302 Foundations of Method in Art Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Geiss Room L-108 

The content of this course includes a study of research findings of the pattern of 
child development in plastic and graphic media; the organization and presentation of 
art experience to the children of grades one through twelve; the relationship of art 
to other areas of the curriculum; and the role of the arts in the extra-curricular program 
within the school and the community. Practical aspects of teaching art including ma- 
terials and tools and their sources, cost, care, and organization are studied. Required 
of fine arts majors. 

24 A406A or B Photography: A Contemporary Art Form Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Martens Room L-131 

The content is predominantly creative, using the technical materials as a medium 
of expression and experimentation. The work of leading contemporary- artists using 
photography as an art medium is studied. 

24 A408 Multi-Media Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Barnet Room L-229 

This course will present an opportunity to bring together pre\ious fine arts ex- 
perience in painting, sculpture, and various aspects of theater arts. 

The projects will be architectural and environmental in nature and will ser\e to 
introduce the student to both historical and contemporary ideas of total-art. Formerly 
24-452. 

24 A410 Masterpieces of World Art Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Kampf Room L-108 

Designed for non-art majors, this introductor}- course studies key words of art repre- 
senting prehistoric cultures, the ancient world, the East, the Renaissance, and the 
modern period, in reference to their historical and cultural settings and the personality 
of the artist. The course employs illustrated lectures, museum and gallery trips, read- 
ings, and discussion. Formerly 24:493. 

24 A4n History of American Art Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mrs. Schiebel Room L-209 

An examination of art in the United States from the Colonial period to the present, 
with special consideration given to the question of the development of an American 
"style" in the light of its relationship to, and dependence upon, European art. The 
landscape, portrait and genre traditions in the painting of the United States are studied, 
as well as developments of the Twentieth Centur}-, Folk, classical, and modem expres- 
sions in sculpture will be surveyed as well as architecture from colonial dwellings to 
works of this century. (Formerly 24-41 3) 

Fine Arts 55 



24 A445A or B or C or D Life Drawing Cr. 2 s.b. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room L-230 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room L-230 

Fine arts majors study the structure and proportions of the human form with 
emphasis on expressiveness of drawing. Elective for fine arts majors. 

A $15.00 Model Fee will be payable at registration. Please send a separate check 
for $15.00 payable to Student-Faculty Cooperative. 

24 A511A or B or C or D Painting Cr. 2 s.b. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Barnet Room L-225 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Barnet Room L-225 

Studio in painting is designed to further the creative impression and technical 
knowledge of the student in various painting media. Emphasis will be upon personal 
and professional development through studio work, trips, and the study of the work of 
contemporary artists. 

24 A521A or B or C or D Sculpture Cr. 2 s.b. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. De Leeuw Room L-126 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. De Leeuw Room L-126 

In these courses the student is expected to explore independently one or two 
materials and techniques and to begin to find his own directions as a sculptor. 

24 A525A or B Metalwork and Jewelry Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Kyle Room L-126 

Experiences in this sequence involve the designing of jewelry and small sculpture 
in varied metals and employing the techniques of flat sheet metal and casting. 

24 A531A or B or C or D Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture Cr. 2 s.b. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-7:30 Mr. Watts Room L-129 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. McCreath Room L-129 

This course is designed for continued experimentation with the potter's wheel, 
various handbuilding methods of forming and further experimentation with clay com- 
postions, glazes and methods of firing. 

Advanced students will be held responsible for developing a consummate crafts- 
manship and a personal idiom. Prerequisite: Undergraduate experience in ceramics, 
portfolio, or instructor's approval. 

24 A550A or B or C or D Silk Screen Printing Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Vernacchia Room L-228 

This course affords an opportunity to study and practice the graphic art techniques 
of silk screen from the creation of the master design through the construction of nec- 
essary printing facilities and printing. Experiences will include the use of tusche, glue, 
stencil lacquer and photographic techniques. 

24 A553A or B or C or D Lithography Cr 2 s h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Vernacchia Room L-228 

This course is designed to provide opportunity for the student to acquire com- 
petency in the art of lithography. All steps from design and execution of master draw- 
ing to the finished print are covered. Studio experiences provide the student with first 
hand knowledge of tools, materials, and techniques of the lithographic process. Adapta- 
tion of the hthographic phase of print-making to classroom use is also studied. 

56 Fine Arts 



24 A590 Modern Philosophies of Art Cr. ^ s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Kampf Room L-108 

The work of the major writers in art in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 
is examined. Exploration is made in the nature of the creative experience, the function 
of art in the life of the individual and of society, the nature of the creative process, 
the rise of new materials, and institutions and sentiments affecting current thinking in 
the field. Discussions are based on readings of philosophers, poets, social scientists, 
psychologists, and artists. For Fine Arts majors and others by Departmental permission. 

24 A591 Selected Problems in Art History Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Plummer Room L-108 

This is a seminar course dealing with selected art problems of historic, social, and 
philosophic nautre. Some of the following topics are chosen for a detailed examination: 
the human figure in the history of art; the rise of landscape painting; Impressionism 
in the East and West; historical views of art criticism; the self-portrait; Romanticism 
and Realism; art and society; the art market; the relation of the sciences; and the rise 
of "Isms." Methods of dealing with selected topics include lectures, readings, reports, 
and discussion. 

24 A603 Seminar in Art Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room L-229 

This course is designed primarily to afford the graduate student an opportunity to 
make an extensive study in the field of art. Prerequisite: Educ. 503. 

The seminar extends through Fall and Spring semesters. Within this period, each 
student will carry out either A or B: 

A. WRITTEN PROJECT. The student will enroll, with the approval of the 
graduate advisor, in this course F.A. 603, Graduate Seminar in Art. Approval 
should be secured in the spring semester or summer session preceding fall 
registration into F.A. 603. 

B. CREATIVE PROJECT. Prerequisite: at least one course in the chosen studio 
area, during which course the student must secure: 1. approval of the instructor 
as to competence in the medium 2. agreement by one particular faculty mem- 
ber to serve as personal advisor throughout the creative project; and 3. approval 
of the departmental graduate advisor. Upon such appro\al, the student will 
enroll for the subsequent fall semester in course F.A. 603. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

26 407 Consumer Economics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday & Hiursday 4:00-5:15 Staff Room F-104 

A study of how the family uses resources to acquire meaningful living. Content 
includes the motivations which influence American families' consumption patterns, 
credit use, financial security and protection, savings and investments, marketing sys- 
tems and pricing variations, and approaches to sound financial management. Open to 
all students. 

26 A510 Interdisciplinary Study of the Family Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room F-107 

To familiarize students with contributions which various academic disciplines 
(histor}', anthropolog}', biolog\', economics, as well as psychology and sociolog)') 
make towards a more comprehensve understanding of family life. 

Fine Arts and Home Economics 57 



26 A511 Contemporary Issues in Home Economics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Sandford Room F-10$ 

A seminar dealing with timely issues in home economics with special emphasis on 
changes in society which affect the family. Attention is centered on problems of con- 
tinuing concern. 

26 A520 Dynamics of Family Interaction Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room F-105 

A critical review of concepts and theories, both psychological and sociological, 

which are currently used in understanding patterns and problems of family relationships. 

26 A530 Management of Family Resources Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mrs. Alcaro Room F-105 

A study of the family as a decision-making unit directing its resources for more 
effective living. Philosophical, psychological, sociological and economic trends which 
have a direct influence on the family's ability to maximize its resource potential and 
utilization are included. 

26 A531 Housing and the Family Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Mukherjee Room F-107 

A study of the principles of family housing; analysis of location, structure, design, 
furnishings, and equipment as a setting for the physical and emotional development of 
the individual and the family. 

26 A540 Child in the Family Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-9:10 Mrs. Silver Room F-107 

An intensive study of the theories and research related to child rearing technique 
including a critical analysis of factors influencing parental practices and their effects 
on the child. 

26 A550 New Findings in Nutrition Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mrs. Kelley Room F-107 

Recent developments in nutrition and a critical review of fundamentals. Pre- 
requisite: Nutrition 306 or equivalent. 

26 A603 Advanced Studies in Home Economics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Miss Ruslink Room F-105 

Library or experimental research on specific problems of limited scope. Work 
may be taken in the following areas: (a) child and family (b) family and consumption 
economics (c) family housing (d) foods (e) nutrition (f) textiles and clothing. 
Prerequisite: Educ. 503. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
AND TECHNOLOGY 

28 Alio Foundations of Design Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 6:30-10:00 Staff Room R-OOl 

Methods of designing with materials are introduced. Creativity, brainstorming,' 
problem solving, and analysis are methods which are considered and applied in the 
solution of fundamental problems of designing with materials. (Formerly 28-111) 

58 Home Economics and Industrial Education and Technology 



28 A120 Foundations of Industry-Drafting Cr. 2 s.li. 

Fall Tuesday 7:>0-10:00 Mr. Goodall Room R-OOl 

Through the development of drafting problems students gain an understanding of 
the concepts, principles, and practices employed in the drafting industry. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of sketching, mechanical skills and techniques as they are 
applied to orthographic and pictorial drawing. (P'ormerly 28-121) 



28 A130 Foundations of Industry-Graphic Arts Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room F-117 

The development of printing is studied in terms of the various reproductive 
methods. Stress is placed on composition, layout and platen presswork; etching tech- 
niques; block printing; bookbinding; rubber stamp making; screen process print- 
ing; duplicating techniques; photography; and related processes. 



28 A140 Foundations of Industry-Wood Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 6:30-10:00 Mr. Schumm Room F-118 

An overview of the wood product industries with emphasis on the study of the 
lumber industry, standard hand tool and common machine operations, as well as basic 
finishing processes. 

28 A321 Industrial Drafting Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Goodall Room R-OOl 

The principles and techniques previously learned are employed in mechanical 
problems involving planning, layout, details, and assembly drawing. Students will be 
introduced to recent technological developments in this area. Prerequisite: Ind. Ed. 120. 



28 A404 Independent Studies in Industry Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall (To be arranged) Staff 

Spring (To be arranged) Staff 

Independent Studies in Industry is designed to encourage students to pursue 
individual study problems under the guidance of a sponsoring faculty member. Tlie 
study to be performed will be based on a problem jointly agreed upon by the student 
and the faculty sponsor. Prerequisite: Application through Department office prior to 
registration. 



28 A4n Design in Industry Cr 3 sh. 

Spring Monday 6:30-10:00 Mr. Goodall Room R-OOl 

The industrial designer's approach to design dictates the course activities. Stu- 
dents design products which are adaptable to mass-production techniques in the con- 
temporary market. (Formerly 28-412) Prerequisite: Ind. Ed. 110. 



28 A423 Architectural Drafting-Residential Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Goodall Room R-OOl 

The design and drafting of residential houses is studied. Emphasis will be placed 
on house construction principles, planning and design, architectural drafting tech- 
niques, and the writing of specifications. Prerequisite: Ind. Ed. 120 or permission 
of instructor. 

Industrial Education and Technology 59 



28 A433 Photographic Technology Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room F-117 

Photographic equipment, materials, and processes utilized in the graphic arts in- 
dustry are explored through a variety of experiences in industrial photography. Included 
are the areaes of line and halftone photography, color separation, photolithography, 
photoengraving, printed circuits, and photomitography. Prerequisite: Ind. Ed. 232 
or permission of instructor, 

28 A443 Wood Technology Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Schumm Room F-118 

A study of the origins, development, and advances made in the field of woods, 
with emphasis placed on the nature of wood, the physical characteristics, and the prop- 
erties of wood. Stress is given to a study of the manufacturing processes, industrializa- 
tion, and mechanization that has taken place in the wood industry, including 
occupational groups. Prerequisite: Ind. Ed. 342 or permission of instructor. 

28 A463 Metal Technology Cr. 2 sh. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Savage Room F-119 

The study and discussion of current industrial metalworking concepts and proc- 
esses, such as quality control, metallurgy, numerical control, and principles of auto- 
mation. Laboratory activities will afford the opportunity for students to become 
involved in mass production techniques and individual experiments. Prerequisite: Ind. 
Ed. 262 or permission of instructor. 

28 A483 Power Technology Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Ter>'ek Room F-119 

Advanced technical study of internal and external combustion engine and of 
fluid power. In addition to the study of established engines, power sources in the 
developmental stage will be examined. Much of the course work will consist of work 
on individual problems in power. Prerequisite: Ind. Ed. 280 or permission of instructor. 

28 A496 Jewelry Making and Lapidary Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 6:30-10:00 Mr. Dorner Room F-118 

Spring Thursday 6:30-10:00 Mr. Dorner Room F-118 

Laboratory experience includes the design of pieces that will involve casting and 
wrought jewelry processes. Lapidary experiences cultivate skills in sawing, shaping, 
polishing, and mounting stones to exhibit their inherent qualities. 

28 A501 Curriculum Construction and Course Organization 

in Industrial Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Frankson Room F-106 

Curriculum construction techniques used in developing a program of industrial 
arts are studied. Special emphasis is placed on the development of industrial arts 
courses and instructional materials. 

28 A504 Supervision of Industrial Arts Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Frankson Room F-106 

Principles and practices of supervision, as related to the modern industrial arts 
laboratory' are discussed and evaluated. Special attention is given to supervisor}' tech- 
niques, budget supplies, inventories, maintenance, safety, and upgrading of in-service 
teachers. 

60 Industrial Education and Technology 



28 A508 Problems in Organizing and Teaching Cooperative 

Industrial Education Programs Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:S0-9:U) \lr. \'an Zwedcn Room F-106 

The coordinator is acquainted with the various practices for coordinating high 

school programs with the needs for local industry. Emphasis will be placed on the 
super\'ising responsibilities within the school, and the cooperation required with 
public and private agencies. 



28 A509 Curriculum Construction in Vocational-Technical Education Cr. 2 s.h. 
Spnng Monday 7:50-9:10 Mr. \'an Zweden Room F-106 

A survey of vocational curriculum construction techniques designed to meet the 
needs of related and laboratory teaching and school-work programs. Emphasis will be 
placed on curriculum materials especially adapted to the needs of part-time coopera- 
tive trade occupational programs. 



28 A601 Independent Study in Industrial Arts Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall (To be arranged) Staff 

Spring (To be arranged) Staff 

This course is designed to allow students to pursue study on individual problems 
under the guidance of a sponsoring faculty member. In addition, credit may be ob- 
tained for Ind. Ed. 601 upon completion of an approved industrial course related to 
the student's special area of interest. Registration for this course is by permission of 
the advisor only. 



28 A603 Research Seminar in Industrial Arts Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall & Spring Wednesday 5:00-7:00 (Meets Entire Year) Dr. Earl Room F-106 
Two patterns of research are considered in this seminar: (1) Industrial research 
techniques with materials and processes as they may be adapted to industrial arts pro- 
grams in public school, (2) Education research techniques as they are applied to prob- 
lems in industrial arts education. Prerequisite: Educ. 503. 



Vocational-Technical Education 

29 A414 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational-Technical Education Cr. 3 s.h 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room F-107 

The teachers of vocational-technical education are provided the opportunity to 
study the philosophy, principles and practices of vocational-technical education. A 
brief history of the cultural, social, economic, technical and governmental forces 
which affected the development of vocational-technical education are studied. The 
organization and function of the federal and state divisions of vocational education are 
presented. 



29 A441 Instructional Material Development in Vocational-Technical 

Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Sprmg Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room F-ZZO 

The development of instructional material applicable to the vocational education 

program. Includes lesson plans, job sheets, demonstration materials, units, tests and 

examinations. 

Industrial Education and Technology 61 



29 A471 Vocational-Technical In-Service Teaching Seminar Cr. 8 s.h. 

Fall and Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 (Meets Entire Year) Staff 

This is a two part course which covers an academic year. The first part of the 
course, occurring in the first semester of enrollment, involves the student in a bi-weekly 
seminar and on-the-job supervision by the seminar instructor. The second part of the 
course, occurring in the succeeding semester of enrollment, provides for on-the-job 
supervision and individual conferences. 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 

30 200 Introduction to School Library Service Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 4:00-5:40 Miss Gibson Room S-102 

An understanding of the functions and services of the school library in relation 

to all other types of libraries is studied. The development of library science, books 

and printing, as well as censorship problems and the ethics of the library profession, 
are discussed. The concept of a material center encompassing non-book material is 
introduced. 

30 301 Reference and Bibliography I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 4:00-5:40 Miss Gibson Room S-102 

(This course meets from February 2 to April 6.) 

30 302 Reference and Bibliography II Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 4:00-5:40 Miss Gibson Room S-102 

(This course meets from April 8 to May 25.) 
The reference and bibliographic course is an examination and study of the basic 
reference materials with emphasis on those most useful in the school library. Ency- 
clopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks, atlases, indexes, specialized reference books, and 
bibliographies in major subject fields are included. Training in the use of the catalog 
as a basic reference tool is stressed. 

30 303 Fundamentals of Cataloging and Classification Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 4:00-5:15 Staff Room S-101 

This course covers principles involved in the cataloging and classification of books, 
pamphlets, and non-book materials according to the Dewey Decimal System. Extensive 
practice in the application of these principles is provided through laboratory experience. 
A knowledge of typing is desirable. 

30 403 Reading Materials for Children and Youth Cr. 4 s.h. 

Fall Mon., Tues., Wed., Fri. 5:00-5:50 Miss Gibson Room S-102 

This course consists of a study and evaluation of library materials provided by the 
modern school library to meet the needs of youth. Extensive critical reading of books for 
children and young adults is required. Principles of book selection are emphasized and 
experience in the use of selection tools is provided. The point of view relates the 
library collection to the total school program. 

30 404 Organization and Administration of School Libraries Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Mon., Wed., Fri. 4:00-4:50 Miss Gibson Room S-102 

Practical experience in setting up effective routines is stressed. These routines include 
budgeting, locating sources for library materials, purchasing materials, book processing, 
preparing library reports and statistics, taking inventory, planning and adapting library 
rooms and equipment, and evaluating library collections and services. 

62 Industrial Education and Technology and Library Science 



DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Language 
05 101 Swahili I Cr. 3 sh 

Fall Mon. & Wed. 5:00-6:30 Mr. Ngari Room C-309 

05 102 Swahili If Cr. 3 sh 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 5:00-6:30 Mr. Ngari Room H-012 

This course is designed for students who desire to start Swahili in college. Special 
emphasis is placed on training the student to understand, speak, read, and write the 
language. 

404 A401X Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages 

in Secondary Schools Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Knecht Room C-117 

Focused on: values of foreign language teaching; ultimate and immediate aims in 
foreign language teaching; survey of the outstanding methods, pronunciation, oral work, 
reading, grammar, reviews, realia, examinations, tests and supcnased study. The course 
consists of readings and discussions, lesson planning and demonstrations, and organiza- 
tion of materials for use in student-teaching. 

40 410B Roman Civilization During the Empire Cr. 2 sh. 

Fall Saturday 9:30-12 noon Staff Room C-113 

(Course meets from September 27 to December 6.) 
This course is designed to acquaint students and teachers with the Roman Con- 
quest of Europe, with emphasis placed upon the planting of Roman culture and 
civilization. The course will provide a background of history and archaeology for all 
Latin programs. It is particularly recommended to those who will take Language 406. 

40 412 General Linguistics Cr. 2 sh. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Gloeckner Room H-008 

This course introduces the study of linguistics in general and of the Indo-European 
group of languages in particular. It focuses upon the origin, history, and development 
of languages. Through lectures and readings the student is acquainted with the latest 
research findings in both descriptive and historical linguistics. 

40 A422 Methods of Teaching Foreign Language in 

Elementary School Cr. 2 sh. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Susi Room C-226 

This course aims at giving the student a thorough grasp of procedures for teaching 
children in elementary school to understand a spoken foreign language, to learn as 
early as possible the correct pronunciation of that language and to expose these children 
to a foreign culture by means of songs, stories, realia, etc. 

40 425 Methods and Materials of TESL Cr. 3 sh. 

Spiing Monday 5:00-7:30 Mrs. Susi Room C-226 

This course will give training in the basic audio-lingual approach with applications 
and implications for specific teaching situations (in particular the larger New Jersey 
urban population of Spanish -speaking people). Emphasis will be placed on what can 
be done at various levels of English with various kinds of students (children and adults). 

Foreign Languages 63 



40 A603 Foreign Language Research Seminar Cr. 2 s.h. 
Fall (To be arranged) Staflr 

Spring (To be arranged) Staff 

This seminar is designed primarily to provide an opportunity for graduate stu- 
dents in foreign languages to investigate and apply the techniques of research in the 
foreign language field. Prerequisite: Educ. 503 and matriculation for M.A. degree in 
foreign language department. 

French 

41 A100A Beginning French I Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Sergent Room C-113 
41 A100B Beginning French II Cr. 3 s.h. 
Spring Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Sergent Room C-113 

These courses are designed for students who desire to start French in college. Special 
emphasis is placed on training the student to understand, speak, read, and write the 
language. Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the courses. 

41 A200A Intermediate French I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Mrs. Sergent Room C-113 

41 A200B Intermediate French II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Mrs. Sergent Room C-113 

These courses which form a continuation of French 100 A and B are also open to 
students who wish to minor in French but who lack the language proficiency necessary 
for French 101 and 102, courses designed for majors and selected minors. Laboratory 
work is part of the requirements for the courses. 

41 A533 The Age of Enlightenment II Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Roederer Room C-226 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the philosophical, educational, 
and social concepts of the century through intensive study of Voltaire, Montesquieu, 
Rousseau, and Diderot. 

41 A537 The French Novel of the Nineteenth Century I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Sergent Room C-226 

41 A538 The French Novel of the Nineteenth Century II Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Sergent Room C-226 

These courses aim at offering the graduate student an insight into the major works 
and literary criticism of masters of French fiction. 

41 A544 The Contemporary Novel I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Klibbe Room C-226 

This course is designed to acquaint students on the graduate level with the history 
and development of the French novel from Proust to the present day. Major currents 
and trends are analyzed; works of modern novelists, including Proust, Gide, Malraux, 
Sartre, and Camus are read and discussed. 

64 Foreign Languages 



German 

42 A402X German Grammar: Applied Linguistics Cr. 2 s.li 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Lend Room Cl-^^OO 

This course is a review of the most important structural features of German, with 
special emphasis on those areeas of interference with English structure which present 
the greatest difHculties to the student of German. 



Latin 

44 405 Elegy Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring l\iesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. King Room C-117 

This course includes the Roman elegaic poets, Tibulhis and Propertius, together 
with a study of the elegv as a form of poetic expression. Comparisons are made of the 
elegy in Latin and English literature. 



Spanish 

46 AlOOA Begining Spanish I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall lues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Elian Room LL014 

46 A100B Beginning Spanish II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Elian Room H-OH 

These courses are designed for students who desire to start Spanish in college. 
Emphasis is placed on the training of the students to understand, speak, read, and 
write the language. Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the courses. 

46 A200A Intermediate Spanish I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tucs. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-014 

46 A200B Intermediate Spanish II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Sprmg Tucs. & I'hurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-014 

These courses which form a continuation of Spanish lOOA and B are also open 
to students who wish to minor in Spanish but lack the language proficiency necessary 
for Spanish 101 and 102, courses designed for majors and selected minors. 

46 A505 History of the Spanish Language Cr. 2 s.h. 

Sprnjg I'hursday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Gloeckncr Room ILOOS 

A sur\ey of the de\elopment of the Spanish language from its origin to the 
present day in Spain and Spanish America. The course traces the phonological, 
structural and lexical evolution of Spanish from its Latin ancestor, by following the 
process of its transformation, as well as the various stages through which the language 
has passed from the time of its first documcntar)^ appearance. 

46 A524 Seminar in Cervantes Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall \k)nday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Prieto Room LL004 

The course is designed to study Cervantes as a figure of synthesis in the art of 
the novel in Spain. El Quijote, the Novelas Ejemplares and Persiles y Segismunda 
will be analyzed. Oral and written reports will be prepared by the student. 

Foreign Languages 65 



46 A548 Spanish-American Essay Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Rivera Room C-117 

A careful reading of selected Spanish-American authors representing a cross section 
of all Spanish-speaking social classes and tendencies in order to evaluate their reactions 
through their written expressions. A comparison of the main essayists with their con- 
temporaries in Spain and in the United States will show the tenor of political thought, 
inter-influences between the United States and Spanish-America, and the most im- 
portant viewpoints of Spanish-American intellectuals. 

46 A550 Spanish-American Theater Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Rivera Room C-117 

This course aims at acquainting the student, at the graduate level, with the devel- 
opment of the theater of Spanish-America from colonial times to the present. The 
most representative authors of each epoch will be read and analyzed, starting with 
Gonzalez Eslava, up to the most recent ones. Each student will be required to present 
a short research paper on an assigned topic. 



Italian 
49 A100A Beginning Italian I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Battista Room H-012 

49 AlOOB Beginning Italian II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Battista Room H-012 

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Italian and 
aims at imparting the basic foundation in the language. Its purpose is to afiFord the 
required background in the language in order to embark on either a minor or con- 
centration in Italian. Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the courses. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

50 A105 Elements of Statistical Reasoning Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:20 Mr. Gottschall Room F-105 

In this course the student is introduced to the basic elements of probability and 
statistical theory. Applications of this theory to social, economic and scientific prob- 
lems are given. Topics include: systematic organization, analysis and presentation of 
data; probability theory for finite sample spaces; theoretical frequency distributions, 
statistical inference and tests of hypotheses; regression and correlation. 

50 A111 Mathematics Related to the Social and 

Management Sciences I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Mon. & Tues. 8:00-9:15 Mr. Wolff Room F-105 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Mr. Gottschall Room V-154 

This course is designed to give an introduction to the mathematical skills and 
concepts most likely to be useful in the Social and Management Sciences. Topics 
include: linear functions, matrices and linear transformations, elements of linear pro- 
gramming, sets and logic. 

66 Foreign Languages and Mathennatics 



50 A112 Mathematics Related to the Social and 

Management Sciences II Cr. 5 s.h. 

Spiiuo Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Mr. Wolff Room F-105 

A continuation of Math. 111. Topics include: powers sequences and series, ele- 

mentarv' functions and an introduction to probability and statistics. Optional topics 
include a conceptual introduction to differential and integral calculus. Prerequisite: 
Math. 111. 

50 A403 Techniques and Applications of Statistics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Carroll Room F-104 

This course is designed as a basic sun'ey of statistical techniques as applied in the 
social and behavioral sciences. Fundamental concepts and assumptions are stressed and 
justified experimentally, although mathematical proof of theorems is strictly limited. 
Topics include: descriptive statistics, elements of probability, sampling procedures and 
sampling statistics, tests of hypotheses and simple design of experiments. Students are 
expected to have an adequate background in high school algebra. This course is offered 
as a general education elective and may not be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: Math. 105. 

50 A420 Differential Equations Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Demetropoulos Room F-104 

Applications of differential equations and their standard methods of solution are 
treated in this course. Topics are: linear differential equations of the first degree and 
of the first and higher orders, linear equations of the nth order with constant co- 
efficients, linear equations of the second order, exact and total differential equations, 
simultaneous equations, numerical approximation, and series solutions. Prerequisite: 
Math. 222 or equivalent. 

50 A425X Advanced Calculus I Cr. 2 s h 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Stevens Room \-161 

This course develops the calculus of a function of one \ariable as a mathematical 
system. On the basis of postulates for the real numbers, the concepts of function, 
limit, sequence, infinite series, power series, continuity, uniform continuity, differ- 
entiation, and integration will be rigorously developed. Topics considered include: 
.•\rchimedean principle, density of the rationals, intermediate value theorem, Heine- 
Borel theorem, mean \alue theorem, Cauchy convergence criterion, existence theorems, 
and uniform convergence theorems. 

50 A426X Advanced Calculus II Cr. 2 s.h 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Stevens Room V-161 

In this course the calculus of functions of several variables is thoroughly treated. 
Among the topics to be considered are: The Implicit Function Theorem, The Inverse 
Function Theorem, Green's Theorem, Stokes Theorem, Cesaro Convergence and 
Fourier Scries. 

50 A460 Introduction to Applied Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Lacatena Room V-161 

Applications of mathematics to the physical and biological sciences will be dis- 
cussed. The uses of various mathematical concepts in the PSSC, CHEM Study, BSCS 
and ECCP curricula will be examined. Topics include: applications of vectors, matrices, 
progressions, series, limit concepts, digital and analog computers, and analvsis of ex- 
periments. The vehicle will be the specific applications in selected areas of the biological 
sciences and the physical sciences. 

Mathematics 67 



50 A461X Introduction to Computer Science Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Gugel Room V-161 

This course includes: Basic theory of digital computers; techniques of pro- 
gramming in Basic and Fortan languages; applications to the solution of problems in 
the natural sciences. Prerequisiite: Math. 215, 221 or permission of the instructor. 



50 A465X Linear Programming and Game Theory Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Hall Room V-161 

This course provides an introduction to the theory of games and linear pro- 
gramming. Topics include: two-person zero sum games, the normal form, mixed 
strategies, the minimax theorem, symmetric games, solutions of linear programs, the 
classical vitamin problem and the simplex algorithm. 

50 A470 Teaching of Mathematics— Senior High School Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Peters Room V-161 

This course covers the selection, organization, and presentation of mathematics in 
the senior high school. Topics include: organization of classroom activities, lesson 
planning, techniques of motivation, evaluation, use of multisensory aids, and applica- 
tions of established principles of learning. These topics will emphasize the methods and 
materials of teaching contemporary programs of geometry, intermediate algebra, and 
twelfth -grade pre-college mathematics. 

50 A520 Set Theory Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Garfunkel Room V-163 

Topics include the following: historical development, paradoxes, ordered sets, 
Schroder-Berstein theorem, axiom of choice, transfinite induction, cardinal and ordinal 
numbers. Prerequisite: Math. 222. 

50 A521 Real Variables I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Chai Room V-154 

50 A522 Real Variables II Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Chai Room V-161 

Real number systems, Lebesque measurement and integration, differentiation, 
Fourier series, LP spaces, metric spaces, normed vector spaces, Branach spaces, and 
Hilbert spaces. Prerequisite: Math. 425 or equivalent. 

50 A535 Linear Algebra I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Westphal Room V-161 

50 A536 Linear Algebra II Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Westphal Room V-161 

This course is a study of vector spaces and linear transformations, including inner 
product, matrix representations, binary and quadratic forms, eigenvalues and eigen- 
vectors, canonical forms, and functions of matrices. Prerequisite: Math. 335 or 
equivalent. 

68 Mathematics 



50 A540 Probability I Cr. 2 s li 

I'all Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Flaspolilcr Room V-161 

50 A541 Probability II Cr. 2 s h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Flaspolilcr Room \'-16'5 

Topics include: Mathematics foundations of probability, combinatorial analysis, 
random \'ariable$ and ditsribution functions, weak and strong law of large numbers, 
the central limit problem, recurrent events and renewal theory, random walks. Selected 
topics; law of the intcrated logarithm, generating functions. Discrete Markow chains, 
simple time-dependent stochastic processes. Prerequisite: Math. 330. 

50 A554 Projective Geometry Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Nettler Room \'-163 

The methods of synthetic and analytic projective geometry are compared and 
used to emphasize the fundamental concepts of Euclidean Geometry. Emphasis is placed 
upon the dependence of many common properties and theorems of Euclidean ge- 
ometr\' and upon the properties of lines, parallelism, perpendicularity, similarity of 
figures, and the definition of distance. Prerequisite: Math. 450 (412). 

50 A560 Numerical Analysis I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Nettler Room \'-163 

This course deals with the determination of functions from obsersed experimental 
data. Topics include: Polynomial approximation, interpolation, numerical integration, 
numerical solution of equations, linear algebraic equations, matrix inversion and eigen- 
value analysis, numerical solution of ordinarv and partial differential equations. Pre- 
requisite: Math. 535 or permission of the instructor. 

50 A568 Applied Mathematics I Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Parzynski Room \'-163 

50 A569 Applied Mathematics II Cr. 2 sh. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Parzynski Room \'-163 

Topics are selected from: solution of equilibrium and number problems, initial 
and boundary value problems, Laplace and Fourier transform methods, solution and 
eigenvalue expansion, Green's functions, linear operators in infinite dimensional spaces, 
integral equations and calculus of variations. Prerequisite: Math. 335, 420 or 425 or 
equivalent. 

50 A571 Curriculum Construction in Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Walsh Room V-163 

In this course a careful study is made of contemporary programs proposals for the 
mathematics of grades K through 12. Consideration is given to the problem of im- 
plementation of current recommendations. Examination is made of the mathematical 
concept underlying various programs. 

50 A573 Mathematics Materials for the Teacher of Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Malctsky Room \'-154 

This course is concerned with the construction, effective adaptation, and use of 
materials and aids to motivate and improve the teaching of high school mathematics. 
Particular attention is given to the overhead projector; models; and to material for the 
mathematics laboratorv' and for club activities. 

50 A575 Selected Topics in Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Koellner Room \'-154 

A selecion of topics associated with the secondary and early college years of 
mathematics \\ill be investigated from an ad\anced point of \iew. Topics will be 
selected to give the teacher a broader view from such areas as algebra, geometry, 
linear programming and game theory, real and complex analysis, probabilitv and statistics. 

Mathematics 69 



50 A590 Research Seminar in Mathematics Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall & Spring Monday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Koellner and Room V-163 

(Meets Entire Year.) Mr. Garfunkel 

This course is designed to give graduate students an opportunity to investigate 
and apply the techniques of research in the field of mathematics education. Various 
projects are discussed and each member selects and presents a research topic on his 
own. Prerequisite: Ed. 503. 



The following courses are open only to National Science Foundation par- 
ticipants. Students have already been selected and registrations are closed. These 
courses are listed here for record purposes only. 

50 A416 Elements of Finite Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Saturday 8:30-10:10 Mr. Koellner Room V-154 

Topics considered in this course are those dealing with finite, rather than 
infinite sets. Included are such topics as sentences and statements, truth tables, 
sets. Boolean algebra, and linear programming. Applications of mathematical 
techniques in the social sciences are stressed throughout the course. 

50 A436 Elements of Logic Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 8:30-10:10 Dr. Merfeld Room V-154 

This course develops an understanding of formal methods of reasoning used 
in the mathematical sciences. Topics include: methods of deduction, proposi- 
tional functions and quantifiers, consistencey, decision problems and Goedel's 
theorem. 

50 A443X Statistics: Theory and Applications Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 10:30-12:10 Mr. Walsh Room V-154 

After a brief review of probability in the discrete case, this course develops 
the general theory of probability functions and distributions for first one and 
then several random variables. Topics include: Mathematical expectation, con- 
tinuous random variables, distribution of sums of random variables, sampling 
distributions, points and interval estimation, regression and correlation, tests of 
hypothesis. Various classroom experiments are used to guarantee sample data. 
Prerequisite: Math. 340. 

50 A574 Problem Analysis in Secondary Mathematics Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Saturday 10:3:0-12:10 Mr. Garfunkel Room V-154 

The psychology and techniques of solving. Discovery and heuristic methods. 
Intuitive and inductive reasoning in the solution of non-routine problems from 
high school mathematics. Problem formation and test construction. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

60 A406 Modern Music Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-5:640 Mr. Zerbe Room M-015 

This course is planned to acquaint the student with contemporary music and j 
is a continuation of Music 208. It includes a study of the music of Debussy, Stravinsky, ; 
Schoenberg, Berg, Bartok, Hindemith, etc. Students are expected to compose short 
pieces in contemporary idioms. Prerequisite: a college course in music history or its] 
equivalent satisfactory to the instructor. 

70 Mathematics and Music 



60 A413 Masters of the Symphony Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spnng Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Zcrbe Room L-135 

This course helps to provide the student with an understanding and appreciation 
of the classic and romantic symphony through the study of the symphonies of Ilaydn, 
Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, I'chaikovsky, and Brahms. Class analyses, 
including the reading of scores, are made of representative symphonies. Elective for 
non-music majors. 



60 A450 Music Typography Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room M-013 

The preparation of music for publication through the use of the music type- 
writer. Includes preparation of scores, instrumental parts, and vocal scores. 



60 ASn Aural Theory Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Wilt Room M-013 

Review of diatonic harmony (figured bass, triads, sevenths and ninth chords in 
all inversions, modulation, etc.) through extensive dictation, sight singing, harmoniza- 
tion, analysis, and creative use of materials. 



60 A512 Advanced Aural Theory Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Wilt Room M-013 

Chromatic harmony presented as a continuation of Music 511. Altered chords as 
found in the music of Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, and Tchaikovsky. Included are dic- 
tation, sight singing, harmonization, analysis, and creattive writing. Prerequisite: Music 
511 or equivalent. 



60 A513 Composition Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Priesing Room M-015 

Practice in the writing of variations, small forms, songs and music for small en- 
sembles. Analysis and workshop performance are included. Prerequisite: Music 511 
or equivalent. 



60 A516 Advanced Instrumentation Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Christmann Room MO 19 

A workshop course in instrumentation as applied to both orchestra and band. 
Principles of Tuttl instrumentation as applied to both media. Scoring for smaller 
ensembles. Study of instruments, instrumental families and their possibilities and best 
uses. Direct instrumental setting of school, songs, hymns, etc., without the writing of 
a score. Elements of band military march construction and scoring. Ever}^ student will 
hear at least one of his instrumentations played by the college orchestra or band. Pre- 
requisite: Music 511 or equivalent. 



M-^]| 



60 A517 Theory of Sound Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Moore Room M-015 

The phenomena of sound as related to hearing, to music theor}% to musical 
instruments, to the reproduction of music (phonograph, etc.) and to the conditions 
under which music is heard. 

Music 71 



60 A521F Classroom Methods: Vocal Classes Cr. 2 s.h 

Spring Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Wilkes Room M-013 

Elementary and secondary classroom methods in the various media; the course 
deals with the principles, materials, and methods used in teaching class instrumental 
and vocal music. Especially designed for teachers seeking new ideas in teaching basic 
principles of the various instruments, including voice. 



60 A524 A Survey of Wind Instrument Music Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Moore Room M-015 

This course includes music for full band, small ensembles, and solos with em- 
phasis on literature available for bass and woodwind players in the elementary and 
the high school. A laboratory band as well as numerous small ensemble groups 
are formed by members of the class so that performance of all music under considera- 
tion is possible. Special attention is given the music originally composed for wind 
instruments. New music from all publishers is available for examination and evaluation. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

65 AlOO General Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room F-105 

Fall Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room F-105 

Spring Sec. I Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room F-105 

Spiing Sec. II Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-0I2 

An introduction to a representative survey of modern scientific psychology. It is 
also aimed to give the student an understanding of psychological processes in himself 
and other people and to suggest how this knowledge may facilitate his personal ad- 
justment. Topics inchided are scientific methodology, development of behavior, emo- 
tions, motivation, sensation, learning, perception, normal and aberrant personality, 
social behavior and personal and group efficiency. 



65 A201 Child Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room B-002 

This course is designed to help students gain an understanding of human behavior 
with focus on development through childhood. Among the topics considered are the 
following: physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development; learning and 
personal-social adjustment; guided observations of children. 



65 A202 Adolescent Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-007 

This course examines the biological, psychological, and social factors that shape 
the transition from childhood to adulthood. Among the topics considered are the fol- 
lowing: physical, intellectual, emotional, social, vocational and moral development; 
learning and personal-social adjustment; guided observations of adolescents. 



65 A510 Research Methods in Psychology Cr. 3 s.h.' 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Haupt Room H-014 

Spring Tuesday 1:00-3:30 Dr. Rotter Room S-102 

An introduction to research and its application to practical problems. 



72 Music and Psychology 



65 A550 Quantitative and Statistical Methods Cr. 3 s.h. 

lall 'niiirsdav 9:00-11 :Z0 a.m. \^t. Rotter Room L-209 

Principles and techniques of data analysis in psycholog}-. Training in the develop 
mcnt of mathematical descriptions of psychological phenomenon, estimation 
parameters and hypothesis testing. 



of 



65 A553 Urban Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

F\ill W'ednesday 4:30-7:00 Dr. Williams Room L-209 

Primary focus and psychological development of the disadvantaged. Biogenetic 
prospectives, intellectual and language development, moti\ation and scholastic achieve- 
ment, personality and the self-concept, environmental intervention. 



65 E560 Advanced Education Psychology 

Fall Friday 9:00-11:50 a.m. Dr. Hauer 

By special permission only. 



Cr. 3 s.h. 
Seton Hall 



65 A560 Advanced Educational Psychology 

Fall Sec. I Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mrs. Wagner 

Fall Sec. II Saturday 10:30-1:00 Dr. Seidman 

Spring Sec. I Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Seidman 

Spring Sec. II Thursday 4:30-7:00 Mrs. Wagner 



Cr. 3 s.h. 
Room S-101 
Room C-224 
Room B-003 
Room C-310 



This course focuses on the learner and the learning process in school situations. 
The topics include: motivation; acquisition of skills, ideas, and attitudes; technological 
and other innovations in teaching and learning; and evaluation of teaching-learning. 
Prerequisite: an introductory course in psychology. 



65 A561 Developmental Psychology 

Fall Sec. I Tuesday 9:00-11:50 a.m. Dr. Sugarman 

Fall Sec. II Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Koppel 

Fall Sec. Ill Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Dur^ea 

Spring Sec. I Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Duryea 

Spring Sec. II Saturday 8:30-11:00 Dr. Seidman 



Cr. 3 s.h. 
Room L-209 
Room S-102 
Room C-224 
Room B-004 
Room C-228 



Theoretical issues and research findings on mental processes from pre-natal life 
to senescence. (Formerly: Child and Adolescent Development.) 



65 A562 Dynamics of Human Behavior Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 4:30-7:00 Dr. Worms Room K-231 

Consideration is given to the relationship of social forces to mental health. Em- 
phasis is placed on environmental factors which contribute towards behavioral and 
learning pathologies. 

65 A563 Theories of Learning Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 4:30-7:00 Mr. liaupt Room B-002 

Reviews the phenomena of current learning theon and research and their implica- 
tions for education. Prerequisite: Two courses in psychology and special permission of 
the graduate ad\isor. Some background in biolog}' is recommended. 



Psychology 73 



65 A564 Psychology and Education of the Physically 

and Mentally Handicapped Children Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Seymour Room S-lOl 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Seymour Room B-004 

This course surveys current practices and problems in the education of the chil- 
dren with physical and mental handicaps. It is designed for teachers, counselors, 
supervisors, and administrators who may work with one or more such children or who 
may wish to prepare for school and community leadership in developing facilities for 
such children. Prerequisite: A course in developmental psychology. 

65 A565 Psychology and Education of the Socially 

and Emotionally Handicapped Children Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Kraemer Room S-102 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Hauer Room H-008 

This course surveys practice and problems in the education of socially and emo- 
tionally handicapped children. Prerequisite: course in developmental psychology. 

65 A566 Psychology and Education of the Gifted Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Shapiro Room H-008 

This course is designed to present a complete picture of the bright and gifted 
young people in contemporary American life. It surveys the various practices involved in 
their education, as well as the psychological characteristics of this group and socio- 
emotional development. 

65 A567 Abnormal Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Brower Room B-003 

Models and selected research in psychopathology. Topics include: psychopathic 
physical illness, psychosomatic, somatopsychic disorders, neurosis, psychosis, environ- 
mental factor in relation to organic factors. 

65 A568 Psychology of Group Dynamics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Friday 9:00-11:30 a.m. Dr. Brown Room S-102 

This experience will combine a basic foundation in theories of group dynamics 
and illustrative applications to industry, marital political, interracial, and professional 
life, along with the personal participation by the student in a group, interactive process. 

65 A573 Physiological Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Floyd Room H-008 

An investigation of physiological correlates of behavior with emphasis on the 
sensory apparatus as well as the major neurc -endocrine integrating relationships as 
seen in the more complex behaviors, such as emotion, the primary drives, and arousal 
states. Prerequisites: one course in psychology and biology or by special permission of 
instructor. 

65 A574 Individual Intelligence Testing Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Shapiro Room H-013 

Spring Sec. I Tuesday 9:00-11:30 a.m. Dr. Shapiro Room S-102 

Spring Sec. II Thursday 9:00-11:30 a.m. Staff Room S-102 

Administration, scoring and interpretation of individual intelligence tests. Each | 
student is required to develop competence in the use of the Stanford-Binet Scale and J 
the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children. Prerequisite: Approved certification can-, 
didacy in the school psychology program. 

74 Psychology 



65 A575 Projective Techniques I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 8:50-11:00 Dr. Kracmer Room B-003 

Presents the basic instruments of projective testing, particularly the Rorschach 
and Thenuitic Apperception Tests, both from the standpoint of basic research and 
of the mechanics of administration and scoring. Prerequisite: .\pproved certification 
candidacy in the school psychology' program. 

65 A576 Projective Techniques II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Saturday 8:30-11:00 Dr. Seymour Room S-102 

This course enables the student to move from the theoretical to the practical 
application of projective tests. Each student is required to administer, score and 
analvze individual cases. The major emphasis is on the Rorschach and Thematic Ap- 
perception Test. Prerequisite: Projective Techniques I. 

65 A578 Psychological Tests and Measurements Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 4:30-7:00 Dr. Seidman Room E-OOl 

Theor\-, construction, and application of psychological tests. 

65 E580 Personality Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Friday 1:00-3:30 Dr. Shapiro Seton Hall 

65 A580 Personality Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Floyd Room S-101 

Major theories and clinical and experimental findings. 

65 A590 Diagnostic Case Studies I Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Ihursday 4:30-7:00 Dr. Kraemer Room B-002 

Learning to use diagnostic material and learning to write up diagnostic findings. 
Students are invohed in the understanding of the unique value of various diagnostic 
tools and the criteria for selection of each in relation to the preserL" school problem. 
Prerequisites: Approved certification candidacy in the school psychology- certification 
program . 

15 E601EX Workshop in Education: Psychology: Internship Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall (To be arranged; Staff Newark 

Spring (To be arranged) Staff Newark 
By special permission only. 



65 A660 Seminar in Educational Psychology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 4:30-7:00 Dr. Seidman Room BOO 5 

This seminar is designed primarily to provide an opportunity for graduate students 
in p-iycho^cgy to i ivestigate and apply the techn-ques in research in the psychology 
field. P-erequ'site: Psych. 510 and mai iculation for M.A. degree in psychologv or 
candidacy for certification in school psychology. 

Psychology 75 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health Education 
73 A408 Driver Education Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Monday 6:30-10:30 Dr. Coder Room C-117 

Spring Monday 6:30-10:30 Dr. Coder Room C-117 

A basic course for the certification of Driver Education teachers. The course 
consists of a minimum of 40 hours of class recitation and /or discussion and 20 hours 
of practical experience. Prerequisite: Driver's license and three years of satisfactory 
driving experience. 

NOTE: Students must be recommended by their high school principal and have an 
interview with the instructor before registration. This course should not be 
selected as a health education elective. 

73 A413 Drug Abuse Workshop Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Hoitsma Room P-005 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Hoitsma Room P-005 

A workshop in drug abuse planned for the upper class undergraduate, graduate 
student and in-service teacher. The workshop is concerned with the physiological, 
sociological and psychological problems associated with drug abuse. Outstanding 
resource personnel will be utilized as well as current literature, audio-visual aids, and 
other materials. The inclusion of this vital topic in the school curriculum will be 
considered. 

73 A414 Workshop in Venereal Disease Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Redd Room P-005 

This Workshop course is designed primarily for the in-service teacher and upper 
class under-graduate students. A study of epidemiology. Federal, State and local control 
programs, pathology, treatment, and legal aspects of venereal disease will be under- 
taken. Particular emphasis will be placed on teen-age incidence of venereal disease, 
and educational implementation will be a primary consideration. 

73 A525 History and Foundations of Health Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Hoitsma Room C-226 

The history of the health movement is traced from 1000 B.C. to the present 

with special emphasis on certain periods that serve as landmarks in man's progress in 

health promotion. The unique role of the school as one agency in health promotion 
is considered in depth. The foundations for programs of health are studied in rela- 
tion to scientific advancements and prevailing philosophies. 

73 A526 Curriculum Development in Health Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Redd Room P-005 

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with opportunities to improve 
his skills and techniques in curriculum construction. The framework of the curriculum 
and criteria for selection of curricular experiences will be undertaken. A review and 
analysis of appropriate teaching methods, materials, and evaluation procedures will also 
be considered. Prerequisite: A methods course in Health Education. 

73 A528 The Evaluation of Health Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Hoitsma Room C-228 

The procedures useful in determining the effectiveness of the school health pro- 
gram and its several phases are considered. The purposes of evaluation, devices avail- 
able, and administrative problems are discussed. The development and interpretation 
of evaluation devices are an important part of the course. Prerequisite: A methods 
course in Health Education. 

76 Health and Physical Education 



Physical Education 

76 A417 Dalcroze Eurhythmies Cr. 2 s.h. 

I-all 'I'licsday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Sonimer Room P-006 

The course deals witli tlic philosopliy and methods of Jacques Dalcro/.e, noted Swiss 
musician and music educator. The aim is to develop musicality and bodily coordination 
through the use of music and natural body movement. It presents a creative approach 
to teaching in music and physical education. Prerequisite: The ability to read and 
write music. Some ability in playing an instrument is desirable but not compulsory. 

76 A551 Philosophy of Recreation in School and Community Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall W^ednesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room H-008 

Presents a survey of the development of recreational philosophies and a study and 
evaluation of the modern philosophy in America. The organization of recreation in 
school and community, the importance of leadership, social and cultural implications, 
economic, governmental, and leisure time influences, and a study of current practices 
will be undertaken. 

76 A555 Scientific Analysis of Sport and Physical Education Skills Cr. 2 s.h. 
Fall Monday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Horn Room P-005 

This course is concerned with the principles of efficient mo\ement as determined 
through research in allied fields. A study of mechanical and physiological principles 
will be undertaken to emphasize their importance in accelerating and improving motor 
learning as well as efficient body movement. Laboratory exercises, projects, and demon- 
strations will be the primary methods involved. 

76 A570 Current Trends in Elementary Physical Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room P-005 

A study of the selection of appropriate physical education activities for ele- 
mentary and high school programs based on principles of growth and development 
and psychological and sociological needs. Current trends and practices will be investi- 
gated and evaluated. Opportunities will be made available for working in the student's 
particular area of interest, and to identify the relationship of physical education programs 
at all le\els, and of physical education to other areas of instruction in the school 
curriculum. Prerequisite: Methods course in elementary and secondary physical educa- 
tion. 

76 A575 Foundations and Interpretation of Physical Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-9:15 Dr. Wacker Room P-005 

A brief review of the history of physical education with emphasis on the develop- 
ment of physical education in the United States. Exploration of modern theories and 
philosophies of physical education in the United States and in foreign countries. A study 
of the scientific basis and foundations of physical activity and their relation to per- 
formance and fitness. Prerequisite: A course covering the histor\' and principles of 
Physical Education. 

76 A577 Administration and Supervision in Physical Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Wacker Room P-005 

This course will concern itself with the role of the teacher and administrator 
in supervision in physical education. Techniques of interviews, visitation, conference 
and others will be studied in reference to their use with student teachers, beginning 
teachers, and experienced teachers. Super\'ision of both physical education and class- 
room teachers will be considered. Prerequisite: Three years of teaching experience. 

Health and Physical Education 77 



76 A579 Advanced Tests and Measurements in Physical Education Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Staff Room P-005 

A survey will be made of the development of new tests and techniques for deter- 
mining levels of skill, status in growth and development, and for the various qualities 
which contribute to total physical fitness. Advanced techniques for processing data 
also will be considered. Prerequisite: A course in educational statistics. 



76 A603 Research Seminar in Physical Education and Health Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall & Spring Thursday 7:30-9:10 (Meets entire year) Dr. Schleede Room P-005 

The purpose of this course is to examine the principles upon which research is 
based in physical education and health and to familiarize students with important 
studies, programs, personnel and techniques employed in research in this area. Each 
student will be required to complete a research project which must be presented to 
the physical education faculty for approval. Prerequisite: Educ. 503. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE 



Science 



80 A401 The Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room V-163 

The purposes are: to review the educational objectives of science in the public 
schools; to consider a program of science instruction for secondary schools including 
the new programs; to study aids to instruction such as texts, manuals, workbooks, 
tests and enrichment materials; to make a critical review of evaluation in science 
classes; and to observe and participate in junior high school classes at work. 



80 A409 Sr. High Physical Science Demonstrations Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Mr. Placek Room V-265 

This course furnishes teachers of the physical sciences with demonstrations and 
experiments designed for work in high-school chemistry, physics, and applied physical 
science courses. A detailed study of demonstrations is made with emphasis on visibility 
and avoidance of failure. Emphasis is placed on sources of new demonstrations. 



80 A415 Conservation of Soil and Water Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room V-262 

The social, economic, and ecological implications of soil and water conservation 
are considered together in this course. Discussion periods are interspersed with field 
trips to selected areas. Outside experts bring special contributions in their fields. ;| 
Visual aids are used extensively. i 

78 Health and Physical Education and Science ' 



80 A418 Three Centuries of Science Progress Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:20 Mr. Minor Room V-262 

This course includes a study of fundamental world changes that have resulted in 
the past three hundred years from scientific discoveries. Topics considered are the 
following: a background of the beliefs and practices of the age; the processes of thought 
which produced skepticism; the experiments devised to disprove ruling opinions; the 
new concepts arising from fresh evidence; and the social, economic, and philosophic 
adjustments following the discoveries. 

Stress is given to the nature of scientific inquiry, its cumulative nature, its desire 
for freedom, and how to judge the probable fruitfulness of a research problem. The 
role the man of science occupies in the world today is contrasted with his counterpart 
in earlier centuries. Demonstrations of historical experiments, readings in the original 
literature, and discussions are employed. 

80 A505 Research Seminar in Science Cr. 2 s.h. 
Fall & Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 (Meets entire year) Dr. Becker Room F-209 

This course is designed to afford opportunity for graduate students in science, 
supervisors, and science teachers: (1) to investigate research in science education; 
(2) to organize science experience and science information with the teaching materials 
for the public schools. Each member of the group selects a project. This project must 
be presented to the science faculty and graduate students for evaluation. Prerequisites: 
Matriculation for M.A. degree in science, concurrent registration Educ. 503, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Biology 

81 A100 Introduction to Biological Science Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Monday 6:30-8:00 & 

Wednesday 6:30-10:00 Staff Room F-209 

The organization and behavior of plants and animals are treated in a manner 
devised to develop understanding of man's structure and behavior. Mechanisms of 
heredity and evolutionary change are considered. An understanding of how a balance 
may be achieved among living things is developed to show desirable land use and 
good agricultural and forest practices. Class lectures and discussions are supplemented 
with slides, moving pictures, laboratory experiments and field trips. 

81 A4n Microbiology Cr. 4 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 8:30-2:30 Dr. Koditschek Room V-353 

General biological phenomena are demonstrated by microbial life by means of 
laboratory experimentation with bacteria and other microorganisms. Major topics in- 
clude: history of microbiology, classification, morphology, metabolism, and ecology. 
Emphasis is placed upon the economic importance and the relationship of microor- 
ganisms to human welfare, helath, and disease. Specific laboratory techniques and 
procedures are developed in the course. Prerequisites: General botany, general zoolog}-, 
and inorganic and organic chemistry. 

81 A413 Economic Botany Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Mrs. Arny Room F-209 

The consideration of the importance of plants and plant life to the world in gen- 
eral and to man in particular is the principal aim of this course. The economic importance 
of bacteria, fungi, and other lower plants is considered, as well as that of the seed plants. 

81 A430 History and Philosophy of Life Science Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. McDowell Room V-155 

An historical sun'ey of the major trends in the development of scientific thought, 
assessing the contributions of India, Mesopotamia, Eg}'pt, Greece, Rome, Islam, the 
Middle Ages and the western world. Philosophy and cultural ad\ances will be con- 
sidered as they shape biological thought resulting in the union of physics, chemistry, 
and biolog)- of modern times. 

Science 79 



81 A460 Instrumentation and Techniques for Biological Science Cr. 4 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 5:00-9:10 Dr. Asterita Room V-359 

This course is designed to acquaint students with modern analytical and research 
tools in biology such as manometry, electrophoreses, chromatography, microbial batch 
growth and assay techniques, radiosotope method, micrometry techniques and evalua- 
tion of experimental design and data. Prerequisite: General Physics, Organic Chem- 
istry, at least two years of Biology and Chemistry or Biochemistry is desirable. 

81 A502 Insect Ecology and Behavior Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Shubeck Room V-353 

This course considers (1) the relationship of insects to their environment, (2) 
insect populations, (3) insect behavior. Insects are said to make up "The Rival World" 
of man. This being the case it behooves man to explore how insects react to our mutual 
environment, how insect populations fluctuate, and how insects behave. 



Chemistry 

82 A435 Biochemistry Cr. 4 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 5:00-6:40 and Room V-350 

Thursday 5:00-9:00 Dr. Gallopo & Room V-360 

In this course a study is made of the composition of living organisms, their nu- 
tritional requirements, their mechanism for promoting and regulating chemical action, 
and their metabolism of foods. A laboratory study is made of the components of foods, 
enzyme action, isolation of proteins, etc., blood and urine analysis. Prerequisite: Or- 
ganic chemistry. 

82 A440 Atomic Structure and Bonding Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Wilson Room F-204 

This is a course designed to familiarize the student with a modern conception of 
the structure of matter and to acquaint him with some significant aspects of atomic 
energy. Some of the topics: discoveries leading to knowledge of the structure of the 
atom; isotopes; nuclear fission; nuclear reactions; radio-active isotopes in agricultural, 
biological, and chemical research; and availability of materials. Prerequisites: General 
college chemistry and general college physics, or special permission of the instructor. 

82 A531 Advanced Theoretical Organic Chemistry Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 5:00-6:15 Mr. Flynn Room F-204 

Modern theories of organic chemistry with emphasis on electronic theory and 
reaction mechanisms. 



Physics 

83 A100 Introduction to Physical Science Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 6:30-8:00 and 

Wednesday 6:30-10:00 Staff Room V-259 

This course deals with basic scientific discoveries which have created present-day 
activities in the fields of astronomy, atomic energy and meteorology. The social eco- 
nomic, and educational consequences of these discoveries and the industries growing out 
of them are treated in such detail as to be of service to prospective teachers of social 
studies, English, languages, and other subjects. 

80 Science 



83 A430 Mathematical Physics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. L. Kowalski Room V-259 

In this one semester course, we develop the mathematical tools essential to any 
serious study of Physics at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Topics covered 
include: vector analysis, complex variables, ordinary and partial differential equations, 
matrices, and tensor analysis. Prerequisites: 2 years of calculus and 2 years of physics. 

83 A431 Theoretical Physics I, Advanceci Mechanics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spiing Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Ilodson Room F-201 

In this one semester course without laboratory, students will consider topics in 
mechanics on an ad\anccd level from that discussed in Physics 416. Analytical Me- 
chanics. Some topics considered are: transformations, oscillations, including the anhar- 
monic oscillator, generalized equations of motion. Lagrange's Equations, Hamilton's 
equations, theory of small oscillations, wave propagation, Green's function. Prerequisites: 
Analytical Mechanics and Heat and Thermodynamics. 

83 A432 Theoretical Physics II, Advanced Electricity and Magnetism Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Hamdan Room V-259 

In this one semester course without laboratory, the student is given an opportunity 
to consider the topics in electricity and magnetism on an advanced level from those 
discussed in Physics 402 Electricity and Magnetism. Some of the topics discussed are: 
dielectric flux, A.C. networks, nonsinusoidal A.C., transients and pulses, electromag- 
netic radiation. Prerequisite: Electricity and Magnetism and Calculus. 

83 A530 Advanced Mathematical Physics Cr. 3 s.h. 
Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room V-259 

This one semester course is a follow up of 83-430, in which we de\elop further 
mathematical tools for the solution and description of Physical phenomena. Topics 
covered include: Boundar\- value problems; Laplace's, Poisson's Wave, and diffusion 
equations; Greens function; calculus of variation; Fourier and Laplace transforms. 
Prerequisites: 83-430. 

Earth Science 

84 AlOO The Earth Sciences Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Mon. & W^ed. 8:00-9:15 Mr. Ramsdell Rom C-305 

Land forms and water bodies are treated from the standpoint of origin and evo- 
lution, and, together with the atmosphere, are considered in relation to their influence 
upon life and activities. Tlie laboratory work consists of the study of topographic 
maps, models and other methods of illustration. 

84 AlOl Geology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-305 

The earth and its geographic, stratigraphic, and structural development through- 
out geologic time, the record of the e\olution of life is interpreted through a study of 
rocks and fossils. 

84 A120 Descriptive Astronomy Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall lues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Dr. Allen Room V-258 

y.lj This course in descriptive astronomy is designed for the general student. Acquisi- 

,^ tion of a working knowledge and appreciation of the tool of the astronomer; the nature 
of the solar system; location of points of the celestial sphere, motions and laws relative 
to systems; the nature, classification, and magnitudes of stars; and cosmogony are 
course objectives. 






Science 81 



84 A420 Geology of New Jersey Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Ramsdell Room C-321 

The geology of New Jersey is studied under the following topics: the physical 
features and their origins; geological history; stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy; 
structural geography; and economic geology. Field trips. Prerequisite: 84:102 or per- 
misson of the instructor. 



84 430 Physical Oceanography Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Mon. & Wed. 5:00-6:15 Mr. Wasserman Room C-305 

A study of the principles and methods of oceanography with emphasis on the 
physical, chemical and geological aspects as interpreted through the application of class- 
room, laboratory, and field procedures. Prerequisite: General chemistry, physics or 
geology. 



84 A504 Advanced Historical Geology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Ramsdell Room C-305 

Major problems in geologic history, stratigraphy and paleo-environments as inter- 
preted through lithologic and paleontologic evidence. Field trips. Prerequisite: Stra- 
tigraphy. 



84 A516 Geophysics and Tectonics Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Hamilton Room V-265 

The theory and application of physics and chemistry to geology with emphasis on 
seismology, geomagnetism, heat flow, terrestrial electricity, gravitation and geo- 
chronolgy. These subjects serve as a basis for the study of certain aspects of tectonics: 
origin of the earth, origin of continents and ocean basins, continental drift, orogenic 
processes, etc. Field trips to geophysical laboratories. Prerequisites: Physical Geology 
and College Physics. 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social Studies 

90 A401 The Teaching of the Social Studies in Secondary Schools Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Saturday 8:30-11:00 Mr. Kops Room C-301 

This course presents recent tendencies in educational method in teaching the 
social studies. A program is presented containing the correlation of subject-matter or- 
ganization in socialized recitation, the teaching of current events, projects in citizen- 
ship, and the use of the project-problem as a method of teaching history and civics. 



90 A410 Newspaper in the Classroom Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Cohen Room H-004 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Grieco Room C-301 

This course presents new and standard techniques in the use of the newspaper 
in the English and Social Studies classes in the secondary school. 

82 Science and Social Science 



90 A491 Studies in American Life— the East Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 8:30-10:10 Mr. Bye Room C-228 

This course is a regional study of the United States cast of the Mississippi River. 
It covers New England, the Middle Atlantic States, the South, and the Lake States. 
It deals with the physiographic, economic, historical and cultural patterns of these 
regions. It emphasizes the regional diflFerences which characterize American unity and 
diversity. Motion pictures, lectures, maps, mimeographed materials are used. 



90 A492 Studies in American Life-the West Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Saturday 8:30-10:10 Mr. Bye Room C-226 

This course is a regional study of the United States west of the Mississippi River. 
It covers the Plains States, the Mountain States, the Southwest, and the Pacific Coastal 
States. It deals with the physiographic, economic, historical and cultural patterns of these 
regions. It emphasizes the regional differences which characterize American unity and 
divesrity. Motion pictures, lectures, maps, mimeographed materials, and bibliographies 
are used. 



90 A603 Social Studies Research Seminar Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Saturday 10:30-12:10 Staff Room C-309 

This seminar course is designed primarily to provide an opportunity for graduate 
students in the social sciences to investigate and apply the techniques of research in the 
social studies field. Prerequisite: Educ. 503. 



Anthropology 

91 A405 Psychological Anthropology Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Quintana and Room C-226 

Dr. Floyd 
Emphasizing transcultural research, this course focuses on the interrelated nature 
of culture and the acquisition and modification of human behavior. Cross-cultural 
studies of the life crises form the basis for anaylzing the world view and values of 
selected societies. Units of study are devoted to the cultural origins of deviant behavior, 
and to the development of creativity in culture. 



91 A531 Living Races Cr. 2 s.h 

Spring Wednesday 7:30-9:10 Mrs. Tatkon Room C-226 

The physical anthropology of race: human origins; racial revolution; and racial 
types in the modern world. The facts of race are utilized as the basis for studying race 
relations in contemporary society, as well as for clarifying misconceptions concerning 
race and intelligence, race and culture. 



91 A535 Ethnology I Cr. 3 s h. 

Fall Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-228 

An introduction to anthropology as a field of knowledge: the background and de- 
Jvelopment of culture; culture theory; the universals of culture, e.g., religion, art, leisure, 
I education; the relationship of anthropology to science and the humanities. 

(Not open to social science majors who have completed Anthropology 200.) 

Social Science 83 



91 A536 Ethnology II Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Quintana Room C-228 

The study of primitive and folk cultures as seen in contemporary perspective. The 
purpose of this course is to increase student awareness of the range and variety of 
cultures in today's world, and to improve understanding of factors which account for 
cultural variability. 



Economics 

92 A541X Foundations of Contemporary Economic Thought Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Monday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Kronish Room C-228 

The objectives of this course are: (1) to study the antecedents of current eco- 
nomic theory; (2) to analyze economics as a cumulative science through examination 
of the works of the creative economists; (3) to foster an understanding of the uses 
and limitations of economic theory. 



92 A544X Government and Business Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Kronish Room C-301 

The objectives of this course are: (1) to study the evolution of governmental in- 
fluences on the functioning of the American economy; (2) to analyze the causes and 
consequences of government regulation and control; (3) to foster an understanding 
of the relationship between economic analysis and public policies. 



Geography 

93 A410X Urban Geography Cr. 2 s.h 

Spring Monday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room C-228 

This course is a study of the growth, morphology, and function of cities. Atten- 
tion will be given to the complex, dynamic forces which influence spatial patterns and 
functional changes within urban areas. 



93 A412X Geography of Africa Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Thursday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room C-228 

This course includes a topical and regional study of Africa. Emphasis is placed 
upon the problems of economic adjustment in the tropics. Soils, vegetation, climate, 
physiography, natural resources, and other aspects of the physical environment are , 
examined in the light of man's habitation of the continent. Relations between Africa 
and the rest of the world are analyzed. 



93 A421X Population Problems of the World Cr. 2 s.h 

Spring Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Staff Room C-2261 

An intensive examination of the factors which influence the present-day distri-ji 
butional pattern of the world's people and the political, economic, and social conse- 
quences of this development are considered. Particular attention is placed on man-landj 
relationships as related to population problems of contemporary nations. 

84 Social Science 



History 

94 A 100 The Study of American History Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Mon. & W^cd. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room B-002 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 6:^^0-7:4^ Staff Room H-007 

94 A101 The Study of European History Cr. 3 s.h. 

SpTing Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-007 

The Stnd\- of American History is required of all history majors, and is designed 
to introduce beginning students to the nature and methods of history in general and to 
American history as a special field of study. Majors must also elect either 94.101 or 
94:102 which concentrate on special problems and approach in the field of European 
and Non-W^estern history respecti\ely. The main emphasis in these courses will be on 
student experience in working with actual historical problems and procedures. 

I 94 All! Selected Topics in American History to 1876 Cr. 3 s.h. 

1 Fall Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-008 
In place of the general sur\ey, this course examines the development of the 

American Nation from the period of discovery and exploration to the Civil War and 
Reconstruction through a study of specific issues and problems. The main streams of 
early American thought, the de\elopment of an American society, the establishment of 
our constitutional authority and the contributions and challenges of the various sections 
are analyzed and interpreted. 

94 An2 Selected Topics in American History since 1876 Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & lluirs. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room C-301 

Continues the approach of the earlier course. Examines the development of the 
American Nation since the Civil W^ar. Special attention is given to the growth of 
American thought, the transition from an agrarian to an industrial society and the 
role of the United States as a world power. National responses to our economic, social 
and political development are considered. 

94 Alls Development of Classical Civilization Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room M-013 

Spiing Tues. & Tliurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room C-301 

A study of the history and de\elopment of the Mediterranean based ci\ilizations 
of Greece and Rome with emphasis on those elements of the classical ci\ilizations 
which influenced the subsequent histories of the European peoples. 

94 A121 Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815 Cr. 3 sh. 

Fall Mon. & Wed. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room H-012 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room V-154 

A study of the histor\' of Europe from the end of the Middle Ages to the Con- 
gress of \'ienna: The Renaissance and Reformation; the rise of new monarchies; Tudor 
and Stuart England; the Scientific Revolution; the Enlightenment; the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon. 

94 A122 19th Century Europe, 1815-1914 Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room H-013 

A study of the history of Europe since the Congress of Vienna; the rise of na- 
tionalism, liberalism, socialism and democracy; the Industrial Re\olution; unifications 
[>f Italv and Germanx; imperialism and factors leading to World War I. 



ls.li 

m 



isplact 
iinent ii 



floin C'- 



94 A133 Development of Modern East Asian Civilization Cr. 3 s.h. 

f'all Tues. & 'lluirs. 6:50-7:45 Staff Room C-305 

\ jlcot Modern China and Japan: 1600 to the present. Changes in traditional values and 

*" 0^ -he mutual influence of East and \\^est are studied through an examination of im- 
"" ■ bortant literary, philosophical, anthropological, historical and artistic works. 






Social Science 85 



94 A212 Social History of the United States Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Tues. & Thurs. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room V-258 

This course presents a study of the social and cultural aspects of American history. 
As such, it supplements but does not take the place of ecomonic and political history. 
The course considers population movements and growth, rural and urban social prob- 
lems, status of women, family life, Utopian ventures, mass media of communication, 
amusements and recreation and human rights. 



94 A213 Economic History of the United States Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Tues. & Thurs. 6:30-7:45 Staff Room H-007 

The great trends and movements in agriculture, finance, commerce, manufacturing, 
transportation and industrial relations are traced from their beginnings in the colonial 
period to their contemporary expressions in the present crisis. This course supplements, 
but it does not duplicate, courses in the political history of the United States or 
courses in economic principles and problems. 



94 A424 Diplomatic History of Europe Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Mon. & Wed. 8:00-9:15 Staff Room B-002 

A study of the diplomatic histor)' of Europe since the Congress of Vienna. Em- 
phasis is placed on the development of diplomatic practice and relations between states 
during the period from 1870 to the present. The diplomatic origins and consequences 
of World War I and World War II are examined and compared. An analysis is made 
of Europe's importance on contemporary world diplomacy. 



94 A433X American Colonial History, 1492-1763 Cr. 2 s h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Royer Room C-228 

A study of European colonial activity in the New World with particular emphasis 
on the areas which now constitute the United States. Political, social, economic, and 
intellectual developments receive attention. 

94 A434X The American Revolution and Early Republic, 1763-1828 Cr. 2 shJI 

Spring Thursday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Royer Room C-2261 

Study and analysis of the causes and events of the Revolution, the establishment 
and growth of domestic institutions under the Constitution, and the development ol 
foreign policy. 

94 A523X Modern France Cr. 2 s.h 

Fall Tuesday 7:30-9:10 Dr. Barker Room C-22<: 

This course studies the development of modern France from 1870 to the presenii 

Emphasis is placed upon political, social and economic conditions and trends througli 

the third, fourth, and fifth Republics. 



94 A526X Russia before the Revolution Cr. 2 s.h 

Spring Thursday 5:00-6:40 Dr. Cohen Room C-22' 

An examination is made of the forces which have shaped the course of Russia 
history. Groups and institutions unique to the Russian environment are analyzec 
Among these are the peasants. Tsar, nobility and Greek Orthodox Church. The majc 
social and intellectual movements of the nineteenth century will also be discussed. 

86 Social Science 



94 A527X Economic Development of Europe Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Tuesday 7:50-9:10 Dr. Barker Room C-228 

An analysis of European economic development with major attention to the 
period since about 17^0. Studies are made first of the agrarian economy of Medieval 
Europe, economic expansion during 1500-1800, the Industrial Revolution in Britain. 
Emphasis placed on comparing economic growth during the 19th and 20th centuries 
Britain, France, Germany, Italy and Russia. 



m 



c-r.! 

CIS 



94 A530X Modern Hindu Nationalism Cr. 2 s.h. 

Fall Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Dr. More Room C-226 

A cultural and political history of India from 1800 to the present, this course 
focuses on the contributions of Hindu Nationalism and British Liberalism to the 
Indian independence movement and the post-1947 democratic experiment. 

Political Science 

95 A402 Government and Politics of Africa Cr. 3 s.h. 
Fall Thursday 7:30-10:00 Staff Room C-228 

This course will examine attempts to develop new political systems in the 
African continent, problems of race relations, and the evolution of national, regional 
and Pan-African integrative machinerv- are also studied. Models created by the in- 
digenous leaders and thinkers will be emphasized. The colonial heritage will be drawn 
upon as it relates to system evolution. 

95 A403 Government and Politics of South Asia Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Monday 7:50-10:00 Mr. Mutiso Room C-226 

This course is designed to give an understanding of the political processes of 
South Asia. Emphasis is given to government, political parties, pressure groups, and 
other allied units that form and shape public policy. Particular attention is given to 
developments in India, Pakistan, and Ceylon since World War II. 



95 A404 Government and Politics of the Far East Cr. 3 s.h. 

Spring Thursday 7:50-10:00 Mr. Johnson Room C-228 

This course will consider the evolution of the modern Chinese and Japanese 
political systems as developmental models. Emphasis will be on the evolution of 
I Q.ijlauthorization and democratic patterns in China and Japan respectively. The other 
Far Eastern countries will be treated to the extent that they borrow patterns from the 
jor actors. 



fcto 



|95 A405 Government and Politics of Latin America Cr. 3 s.h. 

'all Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Dr. Fincher Room C-301 

This course is designed to give an understanding of the economic, social and 

)in G2|J)olitical character of contemporary Latin America. The history- of these nations from 

heir wars of independence to the present ser\es as background for the present state 

f affairs in this region. 



Sociology 

6 AlOO The Sociological Perspective Cr. 3 s.h. 

pring xMon. & Wed. 6:50-7:45 Staff Room C-505 

'""foJl . '^^^ ^^ ^ survey course designed to provide a systematic introduction to various 

ciological explanations of human behavior. Emphasis is placed on the rendering of 
ic ^''^Ipcial life into a dispassionate but accurate body of knowledge. 






Tliet 



Social Science 87 



96 A565 Community Resources and Youth Cr. 3 s.h. 

Fall Sec. I Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Kleinberg Room H-004 

Fall Sec. II Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Schreiber Room H-004 

Spring Sec. I Tuesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Kleinberg Room H-004 

Spring Sec. II Wednesday 7:30-10:00 Mr. Schreiber Room H-004 

This course focuses attention on total resources for youth; for the healthy as well 
as deviant child. Emphasis is placed on resources in the child's own family and neigh- 
borhood, in addition to services provided by public and private agencies. Relevant 
federal and state legislation is surveyed. 

96 A568X Sociology of Poverty Cr. 2 s.h. 

Spring Sec. I Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Kleinberg Room H-004 

Spring Sec. II Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Schreiber Room H-004 

This course is a sociological study of poverty as a major domestic problem. Atten- 
tion is given to the causes and effects of social deprivation as well as to historical and 
contemporary efforts at its solution. 

96 A569X Social Pathologies Cr.2 s.h. 

Fall Sec. 1 Tuesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Kleinberg Room H-004 

Fall Sec. II Wednesday 5:00-6:40 Mr. Schreiber Room H-004 

This course examines the nature and scope of social problems and deviant be- 
havior in American society. Among the major social problems considered are juvenile 
delinquency, crime, poverty, prejudice, and our aging population. Public welfare pro- 
grams concerned with rehabilitation and assistance are stressed throughout the course. 

Field Studies 

99 A406 Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands Cr. 2 s.h. 

Christmas Tour: December 24 to 31, 1969 Mr. Bye 

This is an eight-day, field study course devoted to a survey of our nearest island 
possessions. It includes an exploration of San Juan and its vicinity, including the 
University and the rain forest, a two-day trip through the island, visiting pineapple, 
coffee, sugar, textile, and rum producing areas, churches, homes and historic places. 
One day is spent in St. Thomas, largest of the Virgin Islands. The trip to and from 
the islands is made by air. 

99 A467 Florida Cr. 2 s h. 

Spring Tour: (To be arranged) Mr. Bye 

This is a field-study course covering the Florida peninsula including both coasts, 
the Everglades, and the Lake Region. Among the places visited are ancient St. 
Augustine; the winter playgrounds at Palm Beach and Miami; the Tamiami Trail 
through the Everglades; the west coast cities of Sarasota, St. Petersburg, and Tampa; 
and the Lake Region in the neighborhood of the Lake Wales and Orlando. The trip 
affords opportunity for topographical, historical, and industrial studies. 

99 A423 The British Isles Cr. 3 s.h 

Summer Tour: July 11 to August 1, 1970 Mr. Bye 

This is a comprehensive overview of the British Isles, spending about a weel 
each in English, Scotland, and Ireland and a day in Wales. Geographic, historica 
and literary places of interest will be visited including Cambridge, Oxford, London 
York, Windermere, Hampton Court, Windsor Castle, Salisbury, Stonehenge, Stratford 
on-Avon ,and many other places in England; Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the Loch distric 
in Scotland; Caernarvan and Bettws-y-Coed in Wales; Dublin, Cork, Killarney, Limerick 
and Shannon in Ireland. 



88 Social Science 



I 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 
FALL SEMESTER SEPTEMBER 18, 1969-JANUARY 24, 1970 

Number Course Title Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



MONDAY 4:00 P.M. 

30 404 Organization and Administration of Miss Gibson 

School Libraries (4:00-4:50) (Also 
meets Wednesday and Friday) 



S 102 



MONDAY 4:30 P.M. 

65 A660 Seminar in Educational Psychology Dr. Seidman 

(4:30-7:00) 



B 005 



MONDAY 5:00 


P.M. 








10 A603 


Research Seminar in Business Educa- 
tion 
Methods and Instruments of Research 


Dr. Froehlich 


C 


310 


15 A503 


Dr. Heiss 


B 


002 




(Section I) 








15 A514 


School Law 


Dr. Merlo 


S 


102 


15 A533 


Philosophy of Education 


Dr. Haas 


B 


004 


15 A580 


Principles of Guidance (Section I) 


Dr. Castens 


B 


003 


24 302 


Foundations of Methods in Art Edu- 
cation 


Mrs. Geiss 


L 


108 


30 403 


Reading Materials for Children and 
Youth (Also meets Tuesday, 
Wednesday, and Friday) 


Miss Gibson 


S 


101 


05 101 


Swahili I (Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Ngari 


c 


309 


40 A422 


Methods of Teaching Foreign Lan- 
guage in Elementar}' School 


Mrs. Susi 


c 


226 


46 A524 


Seminar in Cervantes 


Dr. Prieto 


H 


004 


50 A425X 


Advanced Calculus I 


Mr. Stevens 


V 


161 


50 A575 


Selected Topics in Mathematics 


Mr. Koellner 


V 


154 


60 A517 


Theory of Sound 


Dr. Moore 


M 


015 


73 A413 


Drug Abuse Workshop 


Dr. Hoitsma 


P 


005 


80 A505 


Research Seminar in Science (Meets 


Dr. Becker 


F 


204 




entire year) 








84 A420 


Geology of New Jersey 


Mr. Ramsdell 


C 


321 


84 430 


Physical Oceanography (Also meets 

Wednesday) 

Foundations of Contemporary Eco- 


Mr. Wasserman 


C 


305 


92 A541X 


Dr. Kronish 


C 


228 




nomic Thought 








MONDAY 6:30 P.M. 








10 A30.5 


Legal Environments in Business I 


Dr. Haas 


C 


319 




(Also meets Wednesday) 








20 A105 


Composition and Literature (Section 
I) (Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


B 


004 


20 A106 
In 


Composition and Literature (Section 
I) (Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


C 


224 






Fall Schedule 


89 



41 AlOOA 


65 AlOO 


73 A408 


81 AlOO 


94 Alls 


94 A121 



Number Course Title Instructor Bldg. Rm. 

MONDAY 6:30 (P.M. (cont.) 

21 AlOO Fundamentals of Speech (Section I) Staff K 129 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Beginning French I Mr. Sergent C 113 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

General Psychology (Section I) (Also Staff F 105 

meets Wednesday) 

Driver Education (6:30-10:00) Dr. Coder C 117 

Introduction to Biological Science Staff F 209 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Development of Classical Civilization Staff M 013 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815 Staff H 012 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

MONDAY 7:30 P.M. 

10 A505 Administration and Supervision of Dr. Freeman C 321 

Business Education 
15 A406 Educational Sociology (Section I) Mr. Salt C 310 

15 A420 Instructional Innovations Dr. Bellagamba, 

Dr. Gorman 

Mr. Venturini C 228 
IS A421 The School in American Society (Sec- Dr. Hamel H 007 

tion I) 
15 A436 Curriculum and Methods in Sex Ed- Dr. Runden C 304 

ucation 

15 A525 Secondary School Building Planning Dr. Merlo S 102 

15 A535 The Teaching of Communication Mrs. Ward C 301 

Skills 
15 A560 Historical and Philosophical Develop- Mr. Gambacorta H 004 

ment of Adult-Continuing Education 
15 A578 Testing and Evaluation in Student Dr. Gelfond B 003 

Personnel Services 
15 A587 Administration and Supervision of Dr. Gregg B 001 

Guidance Programs 
20 A547 The Twentieth Century American Dr. Healey H 014 

Novel 
24 A521A Sculpture Dr. De Leeuw L 126 

B, C, or D 

28 A433 Photographic Technology Staff F 117 

28 A508 Problems in Organizing and Teach- Mr. Van Zweden F 106 

ing Cooperative Industrial Education 

Programs 
50 A535 Linear Algebra I Mr. Westphal V 161 

50 A590 Research Seminar in Mathematics Mr. Koellner, 

Education (Meets entire year) Mr. Garfunkel V 163 

60 A516 Advanced Instrumentation Dr. Christmann M 019 

65 A564 Psychology and Education of the Dr. Seymour S 101 

Physically and Mentally Handicapped 

Children 

90 Fall Schedule 



I 

I 





Number 


Course Title 


Instructor E 


Jldg. 


Rm. 




MONDAY 7:30 


P.M. (cont.) 










65 A574 


Individual Intelligence Testing 


Dr. Shapiro 


II 


013 




73 A525 


History and Foundations of Health 


Dr. Hoitsma 


C 


226 




76 A555 


Scientific Analysis of Sport and Physi- 
cal Education Skills 


Dr. Horn 


P 


005 




MONDAY 8:00 


P.M. 










10 A201 


Accounting I (Also meets Wednes- 
day) 


Staff 


c 


319 




20 A124 


Literature and Sociology (Also meets 
Wednesday) 


Staff 


c 


224 




20 A361 


The English Novel to 1900 (Also 
meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


B 


004 




41 A200A 


Intermediate French I (Also meets 
Wednesday) 


Mrs. Sergent 


C 


113 




50 Alll 


Mathematics Related to the Social 
and Management Sciences I (Also 
meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Wolff 


F 


105 




84 AlOO 


The Earth Sciences (Also meets 
Wednesday) 


Mr. Ramsdell 


C 


305 




94 AlOO 


The Study of American History 
(Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


B 


002 




94 Alll 


Selected Topics in American History 


Staff 


H 


008 






to 1876 (A so meets Wednesday) 








' 


TUESDAY 9:00 A.M. 










65 A561 


Developmental Psychology 


Dr. Sugarman 


L 


209 






(Section I) 








' 


TUESDAY 2:00 


P.M. 










20 A511A 
TUESDAY 4:00 


Literary Criticism to 1800 
P.M. 


Dr. Hanson 


L 


108 




26 407 


Consumer Economics (4:00-5:15) 


Staff 


F 


104 


, 




(Also meets Thursday) 








TUESDAY 5:00 


P.M. 










10 A511 


Improvement of Instruction in Book- 
keeping, Accounting, and Business 


Mr. Posteraro 


C 


319 


Jl 




Arithmetic 








15 A404 


Supervised Teaching Seminar 


Mr. Venturini, 






I'i 






Mr. Bishop, 






J '•' 






Mr. Cuff 


C 


304 


F» 


15 A510 


Introduction to Educational Admin- 


Dr. Mosier 


B 


004 




istration (Section I) 








{\i 


15 A520 


Administration of Modern 
Secondary School (Section I) 


Dr. Bellagamba 


C 


228 


Vl( 


15 A552 


Principles of Reading Improvement 


Mrs. Ward 


C 


109 




in the Secondar\^ School 








I if 


15 A588 


Techniques of Inter\iewing and 


Dr. Gregg 


B 


003 


\ It 




Counselling 








Mf' 


21 A441 


Theater History: Restoration to 


Dr. McElroy 


K 


230 


Si- 




Modern 









Fall Schedule 91 



Number 


Course Title 


Instructor ] 


Bldg. 


Rm. 


TUESDAY 5:00 P.M. (cont.) 








24 A531A 


Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture 


Mr. Watts 


L 


129 


B, C or D 










26 A510 


Interdisciplinary Study of the Family 


Staff 


F 


107 


30 403 


Reading Materials for Children and 
Youth (Also meets Monday, Wednes- 
day and Friday) 


Miss Gibson 


S 


102 


40 412 


General Linguistics 


Mr. Gloeckner 


H 


008 


41 A537 


The French Novel of the Nineteenth 
Century I 


Mrs. Sergent 


C 


226 


50 A540 


Probability I 


Mr. Flaspohler 


V 


161 


60 A406 


Modern Music 


Mr. Zerbe 


M 


015 


76 A517 


Dalcroze Eurhythmies 


Mrs. Sommer 


P 


006 


80 A415 


Conservation of Soil and Water 


Staff 


V 


262 


82 A435 


Biochemistry (Also meets Thursday) 


Dr. Gallopo 


V 


350 


96 A569X 


Social Pathologies 


Mr. Kleinberg 


H 


004 


TUESDAY 6:30 P.M. 








10 AlOl 


Business Organization and Manage- 
ment (Also meets Thursday) 


Dr. Hecht 


C 


310 


11 A208 


Salesmanship (Also meets Thursday) 


Mrs. Sherdell 


B 


002 


20 A225 


Early American Literature (Also 
meets Thursday) 


Staff 


H 


013 


21 A106 


Introduction to Oral Interpretation 
(Also meets Thursday) 


Staff 


K 


129 


24 AlOO 


Introduction to the Visual Arts 
(6:30-10:00 p.m.) 


Mr. DeLeeuw 


L 


229 


46 AlOOA 


Beginning Spanish I (Also meets 
Thursday) 


Mr. Elian 


H 


014 


49 AlOOA 


Beginning Italian I (Also meets 
Thursday) 


Mr. Battista 


H 


012 


50 A105 


Elements of Statistical Reasoning 
(Also meets Thursday) 


Mr. Gottschall 


F 


105 


84 A120 


Descriptive Astronomy (Also meets 
Thursday) 

Development of Modem East Asian 


Dr. Allen 


V 


258 


94 A133 


Staff 


C 


305 




Civilization (Also meets Thursday) 








TUESDAY 7:30 P.M. 








10 A501 


Principles and Problems of Business 
Education 


Dr. Nanassy 


C 


321 


10 A513 


Improvement of Instruction in Steno- 
graphy and Secretarial Practice 


Mr. Rossetti 


C 


317 


15 A408 


Selection and Utilization of A-V 
Materials 


Staff 


C 


121 


15 A422 


The Historical and Philosophical 
Foundations of Education (Section 1) 


Mr. Jump 


H 


007 1 


15 A451 


Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 


Mrs. Gaeng 


H 


008 


15 A503 


Methods and Instruments of Research 
(Section II) 


Dr. Lang 


C 


309 


92 Fall Schedule 











Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



TUESDAY 7:30 P. 
15 A532 

15 A550 

15 A589 



20 A454 


24 A445A 


B, C, or 


D 


26 A550 


28 A120 


28 A443 


29 A471 


60 A512 


65 A561 



76 A577 



82 A440 


83 A430 


91 A536 


94 A523X 


95 A405 


96 A565 


TUESDAY 8:0 


20 A105 

1 


20 A106 


1 21 AlOO 


46 A200A 


65 AlOO 


65 A201 


94 A122 


94 A212 



M. (cont.) 
Principles of Curriculum Develop- 
ment (Section I) 

Guiding the Reading Interests of 
Secondary Students 
Student Personnel Services in Higher 
Education 
Film and Society 
Life Drawing 



New Findings in Nutrition 
Foundations of Industry-Drafting 
Wood Technology 

X'ocational-Technical In-Service 

Teaching Seminar (Meets entire 

year) 

Advanced Aural Theory 

Developmental Psychology 

(Section II) 

Administration and Supervision in 

Physical Education 

Atomic Structure and Bonding 

Mathematical Physics 

Ethnology II 

Modern France 

Government and Politics of Latin 

America 

Community Resources and Youth 

(Section I) 



Staff B 004 

Miss Schantz C 109 
Dr. Davis B 001 



Dr. Earley 
Staff 



Mrs. Kelley 
Mr. Goodall 

Mr. Schumm 
Staff 

Mr. Wilt 
Dr. Koppel 

Dr. Wacker 



V 155 

L 230 



F 107 
R 001 
F 118 



M 013 

S 102 

P 005 



Dr. Wilson F 204 

Dr. L. Kowalski V 259 

Dr. Quintana C 228 

Dr. Barker C 226 

Dr. Fincher C 301 

Mr. Kleinberg H 004 



Composition and Literature I (Sec- Staff 
tion II) (Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature II (Sec- Staff 
tion II) (Also meets Thursday) 

Fundamentals of Speech (Section II) Staff 
(Also meets Thursday) 

Intermediate Spanish I Staff 

(Also meets Thursday) 

General Psychology (Section II) Staff 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Child Psychology (Also meets Thurs- Staff 
day) 

19th Century Europe, 1815-1914 Staff 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Social Histor\' of the United States Staff 
(Also meets I'hursday) 



C 310 

H 012 

K 129 

H 014 

F 105 

B 002 

H 013 

V 258 

Fall Schedule 93 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



WEDNESDAY 4:00 P.M. 

30 404 Organization and Administration of Miss Gibson S 102 

School Libraries (4:00-4:50) 
(Also meets Monday and Friday) 



WEDNESDAY 4:30 P.M. 



65 A553 


Urban Psychology (4:30-7:00) 


Dr. Williams 


L 


209 


65 A562 


Dynamics of Human Behavior 

(4:30-7:00) 


Dr. Worms 


K 


231 


WEDNESDAY 


5:00 P.M. 








11 A520 


Principles and Philosophy of Voca- 
tional — Technical Education 


Dr. Hecht 


C 


310 


15 A503 


Methods and Instruments of Research 
(Section III) 


Dr. Heiss 


B 


002 


15 A505 


The Two Year College 


Dr. Merlo 


S 


102 


15 A510 


Introduction to Educational Admin- 
istration (Section II) 


Dr. Mosier 


B 


004 


15 A540 


Supervision of Instruction (Section I) 


Dr. Peckham 


C 


321 


15 A577 


Social Case Work 


Dr. Williams 


B 


003 


21 A449 


Advanced Public Speaking 


Mr. Ballare 


K 


230 


24 A603 


Seminar in Art 


Staff 


L 


229 


28 A603 


Research Seminar in Industrial Arts 
(Meets entire year) 


Dr. Earl 


F 


106 


30 403 


Reading Materials for Children and 
Youth (Also meets Monday, Tuesday, 
and Friday) 


Miss Gibson 


S 


101 


05 101 


Swahili I (Also meets Monday) 


Mr. Ngari 


C 


309 


50 A403 


Techniques and Applications of 
Statistics 


Mr. Carroll 


F 


104 


50 A461X 


Introduction to Computer Science 


Mr. Gugel 


V 


161 


50 A521 


Real Variables I 


Dr. Chai 


V 


154 


73 A414 


Workshop in Veneral Disease 
Education 


Dr. Redd 


P 


005 


76 A551 


Philosophy of Recreation in School 
and Community 


Staff 


H 


008 


81 A430 


History and Philosophy of Life 
Science 


Dr. McDowell 


V 


155 


84 430 


Physical Oceanography (Also meets 
Monday) 


Mr. Wasserman 


C 


305 


94 A433X 


American Colonial History, 
1492-1763 


Dr. Royer 


C 


228 


94 A530X 


Modern Hindu Nationalism 


Dr. More 


C 


226 


96 A569X 
WEDNESDAY 


Social Pathologies (Section II) 
6:30 P.M. 


Mr. Schreiber 


H 


004 


10 A305 


Legal Environments in Business I 
(Also meets Monday) 


Dr. Haas 


C 


319 


20 A105 


Composition and Literature I (Sec- 
tion I) (Also meets Monday) 


Staff 


B 


004 



94 Fall Schedule 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



W^EDNESDAY 6:30 P.M. (cont.) 

Composition and Literature II (Sec- Staff C 224 

tion I) (Also meets Monday) 

Fundamentals of Speech (Section I) Staff K 129 

(Also meets Monday) 

Foundations of Design (6:30-10:00) Staff R 001 

Beginning French I (Also meets Mr. Scrgcnt C 113 

Monday) 

General Psychology (Section I) (Also Staff F 105 

meets Monday) 

Introduction to Biological Science Staff F 209 

(6:30-10:00) (Also meets Monday) 

Development of Classical Civilization Staff M 013 

(Also meets Monday) 

Early Modem Europe, 1350-1815 Staff H 012 

(Also meets Monday) 



20 A106 


21 


A 100 


28 


Alio 


41 


A 100 A 


65 


AlOO 


81 


AlOO 


94 A118 


94 A121 


WEDNESDAY 7:30 


10 


A434 



11 A524 



P.M. 

Introduction to Business Data Pro- 
cessing 

Techniques of Organizing and Ad- 
ministering a Distributive Education 
Program 



Staff C 309 

Dr. Hecht C 310 



15 


A406 


Educational Sociology (Section II) 


Miss Talley 


C 


117 


15 


A421 


The School in American Society 
(Section II) 


Miss Uhia 


H 


007 


15 


A461 


The Junior High School Curriculum 


Mr. Cuff 


C 


321 


15 A520 


Administration of the Modern Sec- 


Dr. Peckham 


C 


301 






ondar)' School (Section II) 








15 


A586 


Elementary School Guidance Services 


Dr. Gelfond 


B 


003 


15 A601E 


Workshop in Education: Psychology- 
Sex Education 


Dr. Runden 


C 


304 


15 


A610 


The Personnel Services Team 


Dr. Davis 


B 


001 


20 A537 


American Drama, 1920-1945 


Dr. McGee 


C 


226 


21 


A511 


Aphasia and Related Language Dis- 
orders in Adults 


Staff 


K 


230 


24 


A410 


Masterpieces of World Art 


Dr. Kampf 


L 


209 


24 


511Aor 
B or C or D 


Painting 


Mr. Barnet 


L 


225 


28 


A501 


Curriculum Construction and Course 
Organization in Industrial Education 


Dr. Frankson 


F 


106 


29 


A414 


Principles and Philosophy of 
\'ocational-Technical Ed. 


Staff 


F 


107 


50 


A420 


Differential Equations 


Mr. Dcmetropoulos 


104 


50 


A 568 


Applied Mathematics I 


Dr. Parzynski 


y 


163 


65 


A510 


Research Methods in Psychology- 


Mr. Haupt 


H 


014 


65 


A560 


Advanced Educational Psychology 
(Section I) 


Mrs. Wagner 


S 


101 








Fall Schedule 


95 



Number Course Title Instructor Bldg. Rm. 

WEDNESDAY 7:30 P.M. (cont). 

65 A565 Psychology and Education of the Dr. Kraemer S 102 

Socially and Emotionally Handi- 
capped Children 
76 A 5 79 Advanced Tests and Measurements in Staff P 005 

Physical Education 

83 A432 Theoretical Physics II, Advanced Mr. Hamdan V 259 

Electricity and Magnetism 

84 A516 Geophysics and Tectonics Dr. Hamilton V 265 
91 A535 Ethnology I Staff C 228 
96 A 566 Community Resources and Youth Mr. Schreiber H 004 

(Section II) 

WEDNESDAY 8:00 P.M. 

10 A201 Accounting I (Also meets Monday) Staff C 319 

20 A124 Literature and Sociology (Also meets Staff C 224 

Monday) 
20 A361 The English Novel to 1900 (Also Staff B 004 

meets Monday) 
41 A200A Intermediate French I (Also meets Mrs. Sergent C 113 

Monday) 
50 Alll Mathematics Related to the Social Mr. Wolff F 105 

and Management Science I 

(Also meets Monday) 
84 AlOO The Earth Sciences (Also meets Mr. Ramsdell C 305 

Monday) 
94 AlOO The Study of American History Staff B 002 

(Also meets Monday) 
94 Alll Selected Topics in American History Staff H 008 

to 1876 (Also meets Monday) 

THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. 

65 A550 Quantitative and Statistical Methods Dr. Rotter L 209 

THURSDAY 4:00 P.M. 

15 A556 Corrective and Remedial Reading: Miss Schantz C 109 

Part I, Causation (4:00-6:30) 
26 407 Consumer Economics (4:00-5:15) Staff F 104 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
30 200 Introduction to School Library Miss Gibson S 102 

Service (4:00-5:40) 

THURSDAY 4:30 P.M. 

65 A578 Psychological Tests and Measure- Dr. Seidman E 001 

ments (4:30-7:00) 

THURSDAY 5:00 P.M. 

15 A503 Methods and Instruments of Research Dr. Lang C 309 

(Section IV) 

15 A530 Curriculum Construction in the Mr. Salt B 004 

Secondary School 
15 A580 Principles of Guidance (Section II) Dr. Kenyon B 003 

96 Fall Schedule 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



THURSDAY 5:00 P.M. (cont.) 

15 A629 Research Seminar in Secondary 

School Administration 



21 A532 



26 A531 


. 41 A533 


1 46 A548 


; 50 A554 


1 82 A435 


1 90 A410 


1 93 A412X 


1 THURSDAY 6:30 


1 10 AlOl 


, 11 A208 


20 A225 


21 A106 


35 28 A496 


46 AlOOA 

0') 


49 AlOOA 


50 A105 

008 ' 


84 A120 


94 A133 


THURSDAY 7:30 


10 A402 



15 A422 



15 


A431 


15 


A440 


15 


A492 


15 


A540 


15 


A554 


15 A582 



Practicum in Speech or Hearing 

Rehabilitation 

Housing and the Family 

The Age of Enlightenment II 

Spanish -American Essay 

Projective Geometry 

Biochemistry (5:00-9:00) (Also 

meets Tuesday) 

Newspaper in the Classroom 

Geography of Africa 

P.M. 

Business Organization and Manage- 
ment (Also meets Tuesday) 
Salesmanship (Also meets Tuesday) 
Early American Literature (Also 
meets Tuesday) 

Introduction to Oral Interpretation 
(Also meets Tuesday) 
Jewelry Making and Lapidary 
(6:30-10:00) 

Beginning Spanish I (Also meets 
Tuesday) 

Beginning Italian I (Also meets 
Tuesday) 

Elements of Statistical Reasoning 
(Also meets Tuesday) 
Descriptive Astronomy (Also meets 
Tuesday) 

Development of Modern East Asian 
Civilization (Also meets Tuesday) 

P.M. 

Principles and Methods of Teaching 
Bookkeeping 

The Historical and Philosophical 
Foundations of Education 
(Section II) 

Individual and Group Dynamics 
Camping and Outdoor Education 
Comparative Education 

Super\'ision of Instruction 
(Section II) 

Case Studies of Reading Difficulties: 
Part I, Testing 

X'ocational Guidance 



Dr. Peckham 



Staff 



C 321 



K 230 



Mrs. Mukherjee F" 107 

Mr. Roederer C 226 

Dr. Rivera C 117 

Mr. Nettler V 163 

Dr. Gallopo V 360 



Dr. Cohen 
Staff 



Dr. Hecht 

Mrs. Sherdell 
Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Dorner 

Mr. Elian 

Mr. Battista 



H 004 
C 228 



C 310 

B 002 

H 013 

K 129 

F 118 

H 014 

H 012 



Mr. Gottschall F 105 
Dr. Allen V 258 

Staff C 305 



Mr. Posteraro 


C 


319 


Staff 


H 


007 


Miss l^allev 


C 


309 


Staff 


C 


226 


Dr. Gorman 


C 


301 


Mr. Cuff 


H 


004 


Miss Baker 


C 


109 


Staff 


B 


004 



Fall Schedule 97 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



THURSDAY 7:30 p.m. (cont.) 

15 A585 Group Guidance and Counselling 

Activities 
20 A419 The English Language — History and 

Grammar — Linguistics II 
Multi-Media 
Silk Screen Printing 



24 A408 


24 A550Aor 


B or C or D 


24 A591 


26 A540 


28 A423 


65 A561 


65 A580 


76 A603 



95 A402 



Selected Problems in Art History 
Child in the Family 
Architectural Drafting-Residential 
Developmental Psychology 
(Section III) 
Personality 

Research Seminar in Physical Edu- 
cation and Health (Meets entire 
year) 
Government and Politics of Africa 



Mr. Gregg 

Mr. Reaske 

Mr. Barnet L 229 

Mr. Vernacchia L 228 

Dr. Plummer L 108 

Mrs. Silver F 107 

Mr. Goodall R 001 

Dr. Duryea C 224 



Dr. Floyd 
Dr. Schleede 



Staff 



THURSDAY 8:00 P.M. 


20 A105 




Composition and Literature I 
(Section II) (Also meets Tuesday) 


20 A106 




Composition and Literature II 
(Section II) (Also meets Tuesday) 


21 AlOO 




Fundamentals of Speech (Section II) 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


46 A200A 




Intermediate Spanish I (Also meets 
Tuesday) 


65 AlOO 




General Psychology (Section II) 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


65 A201 




Child Psychology (Also meets 
Tuesday) 


94 A122 




19th Century Europe, 1815-1914 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


94 A212 




Social History of the United States 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


FRIDAY 9:00 


A.M. 




65 E560 




Advanced Education Psychology 


FRIDAY 1:00 


P.M. 




65 E580 




Personality 


FRIDAY 4:00 


P.M 




30 404 




Organization and Administration of 
School Libraries (4:00-4:50) (Also 
meets Monday and Wednesday) 


98 Fall Schedule 





Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Dr. Hauer Seton 



Dr. Shapiro Seton 



Miss Gibson 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Blclg- Rm. 



FRIDAY 5:00 P.M 


[. 










30 403 


Reading Materials for Children and 


Miss Gibson 


S 


102 




Youth (5:00-5:50) (Also meets 












Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday) 










SATURDAY 8:30 


A.M. 










15 A503 


Methods and Instruments of Research 
(Section V) 


Dr. 


Lang 


C 


309 


15 A532 


Principles of Curriculum Develop- 
ment (Section II) 


Mr. 


Salt 


C 


310 


20 A526B 


Theory of Drama (8:30-11:00) 


Mr. 


Pettegrove 


B 


002 


20 A535C 


Fielding, Smollett, Sterne 
(8:30-11:00) 


Dr. 


Radner 


B 


005 


50 A436 


Elements of Logic (N.S.F. Students 
only) 


Dr. 


Merfeld 


V 


154 


65 A575 


Projective Techniques I 


Dr. 


Kraemer 


B 


003 


81 A411 


Microbiology (8:30-2:30) 


Dr. 


Koditschek 


V 


353 


90 A401 


The Teaching of the Social Studies 
in Secondar}' Schools (8:30-11:00) 


Mr. 


Kops 


C 


301 


90 A491 


Studies in American Life — the East 


Mr. 


Bve 


C 


228 



h: 



SATURDAY 9:30 A.M. 

40 41 OB Roman Civilization During the Em- Dr. Webster 

pire (9:30-12 noon) (Meets from 
September 27 to December 6) 



SATURDAY 10:30 A.M. 






15 A501 



Tests and Measurements in Secondary Dr. Lang 
Education 



C 113 



C 310 



V :' 



m' 



Seton 






21 A438 


Creative Dramatics 


50 A443X 


Statistics: Theory and Applications 
(N.S.F. Students only) 


65 A560 


Advanced Education Psvchology 
(Section II) 


90 A603 


Social Studies Research Seminar 



Dr. Rockwood K 230 

Mr. Walsh V 154 

Dr. Seidman C 224 

Staff C 309 



Fall Schedule 99 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 



SPRING SEMESTER FEBRUARY 2, 1970 - MAY 25, 1970 

Number Course Title Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



MONDAY 4 

30 301 



30 302 



00 P.M. 



Reference and Bibliography I (4:00- 
5:40) (Also meets Wednesday) 
(Meets February 2 to April 6) 
Reference and Bibliography II (4:00- 
5:40) (Also meets Wednesday) 
(Meets April 8 to May 25) 



Miss Gibson 



Miss Gibson 



MONDAY 5:00 


P.M. 




10 A404X 


Principles and Methods of Teaching 
Typewriting 


Mrs. McCauley 


11 A522 


Advertising Media 


Dr. Hecht 


15 A503 


Methods and Instruments of Research 
(Section I) 


Dr. Lang 


15 A510 


Introduction to Educational Admin- 
istration (Section I) 


Dr. Mosier 


15 A530 


Curriculum Construction in the 
Secondary School 


Mr. Salt 


15 A580 


Principles of Guidance (Section I) 


Staff 


21 A582 


Stuttering 


Mr. Caracciolo 


05 102 


Swahili II 


Mr. Ngari 


40 425 


Methods and Materials of TESL 

(5:00-7:30) 


Mrs. Susi 


42 A402X 


German Grammar: Applied 
Linguistics 


Dr. Lend 


50 A426X 


Advanced Calculus II 


Mr. Stevens 


50 A520 


Set Theory 


Mr. Garfunkel 


60 A524 


A Survey of Wind Instrument Music 


Dr. Moore 


73 A413 


Drug Abuse Workshop 


Dr. Hoitsma 


93 A410X 


Urban Geography 


Staff 



MONDAY 6:30 P.M. 

10 A306 Legal Environments in Business II Dr. Haas 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
20 A105 Composition and Literature I (Sec- Staff 

tion I) (Also meets Wednesday) 

20 A106 Composition and Literature (Section Staff 

I) (Also meets Wednesday) 

21 A204 Fundamentals of Public Speaking Staff 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
28 A411 Design in Industry (6:30-10:00) Mr. Goodall 

41 AlOOB Beginning French II (Also meets Mr. Sergent 

Wednesday) 
65 AlOO General Psychology (Section I) (Also Staff 

meets Wednesday) 
73 A408 Driver Education (6:30-10:00) Dr. Coder 



100 Spring Schedule 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



MONDAY 6: 

83 AlOO 

94 AlOO 
96 AlOO 



MONDAY 7:30 
15 A406 
15 A420 
15 A421 



30 P.M. (cont. 



Introduction to Physical Science 
(Also meets Wednesday) 
The Study of American History 
(Also meets Wednesday) 
The Sociological Perspective 
(Also meets Wednesday) 



P.M. 



15 A436 

15 A504 
15 A531 

15 A561 



Educational Sociology 
Instructional Innovations 
The School in American Society 
(Section 1) 

Curriculum and Methods in Sex 
Education 

"Action Research" for Teachers 
Middle School Curriculum and 
Organization 

Principles and Problems in Adult- 
Continuing Education Program 
Development 



Dr. L. Kowalski 


V 


259 


Staff 


H 


007 


Staff 


C 


305 


Staff 


H 


004 


Staff 


H 


Oil 


Staff 


H 


013 


Dr. Runden 


C 


304 


Dr. Lang 


C 


310 


Mr. Cuff 


S 


101 



Mr. Ast 



H 012 



15 A579 


The Use of Tests in Counseling 


Dr. Gelfond 


S 


102 


15 A639 

20 A544B 

24 A525A 
or B 


Research Seminar in Curriculum 
Development 
Shakespeare, Comedies 
Metalwork and Jewelry 


Mr. Salt 

Dr. Bohn 
Mr. Kyle 


C 

B 
L 


309 

005 
126 


24 A590 
28 A130 


Modern Philosophies of Art 
Foundations of Industry-Graphic 
Arts 


Dr. Kampf 
Staff 


L 
F 


108 
117 


28 A509 


Curriculum Construction in Voca- 
tional-Technical Education 


Mr. Van Zweder 


F 


106 


50 A536 
60 A521F 


Linear Algebra II 

Classroom Methods: Vocal Classes 


Mr. Westphal 
Dr. Wilkes 


M 


161 
013 


65 A560 


Advanced Educational Psychology 
(Section I) 


Dr. Seidman 


B 


003 


65 A564 

65 A573 
73 A528 


Psychology and Education of the 
Physically and Mentally Handi- 
capped Children 
Physiological Psycholog\' 
The Evaluation of Health 


Dr. Seymour 

Dr. Floyd 
Dr. Hoitsma 


B 

H 
C 


004 

008 

228 


76 A570 
92 A544X 


Current Trends in Elementary 
Physical Education 
Government and Business 


Staff 

Dr. Kronish 


P 
C 


005 
301 


95 A403 


Government and Politics of South 
Asia 


Mr. Mutiso 


C 


226 


MONDAY 8:00 


P.M. 








10 A202 


Accounting II (Also meets 
Wednesday) 


Staff 


C 


319 



Spring Schedule 101 



Number 


Course Title 


Instructor 


Bldg. 


Rm. 


MONDAY 8:00 


P.M. (cont.) 








20 A223 


Myth and Literature (Also meets 
Wednesday) 


Staff 


C 


224 


20 A437 


Victorian Prose and Poetry (Also 
meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


c 


321 


21 AlOO 


Fundamentals of Speech (Section I) 
(Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


K 


129 


41 A200B 


Intermediate French II (Also meets 
Wednesday) 


Mrs. Sergent 


C 


113 


50 A112 


Mathematics Related to the Social 
and Management Sciences II 
(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Wolff 


F 


105 


84 AlOl 


Geology (Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


C 


305 


94 AlOl 


The Study of European History (Also 
meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


H 


007 


94 A424 


Diplomatic History of Europe (Also 
meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


B 


002 



TUESDAY 9:00 A.M. 

65 A574 Individual Intelligence Testing 

(Section I) 



Dr. Shapiro 



TUESDAY 1:00 P.M. 

65 A5I0 Research Methods in Psychology Dr. Rotter 

TUESDAY 4:00 P.M. 

30 303 Fundamentals of Cataloging and Staff 

Classification (4:00-5:15) (Also 
meets Thursday) 



^SDAY 5:00 


P.M. 




10 A300 


Business Mathematics 


Miss Uzzolino 


10 A502 


Evaluation of Current Literature in 
Business Education 


Dr. Nanassy 


15 A405 


Supervised Teaching Seminar 


Staff 


15 A503 


Methods and Instruments of Research 
(Section II) 


Dr. Heiss 


15 A511 


School Business Administration 


Dr. Merlo 


15 A541 


Supervision in Special Fields 
(Section I) 


Staff 


15 A553 


Techniques of Reading Improvement 
in the Secondary School 


Mr. Brunner 


15 A580 


Principles of Guidance (Section II) 


Staff 


20 A510 


Wordsworth and Coleridge 


Mr. Grieco 


21 A565 


Advanced Oral Interpretation 


Mr. Ballare 


26 A511 


Contemporary Issues in Home 
Economics 


Mrs. Sandford 


41 A538 


The French Novel of the 19th 
Century II 


Mrs. Sergent 


44 405 


Elegy 


Mr. King 



102 Spring Schedule 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



TUESDAY 5:00 
50 A465X 

50 A541 
60 A511 
60 A513 

81 A460 

82 A531 

96 A568X 

TUESDAY 6:30 
10 A201 

20 A226 

21 AlOO 
24 AlOO 
28 A140 
46 AlOOB 

49 AlOOB 

50 Alll 

80 A418 
94 A112 
94 A213 

^UESDAY 7:30 
15 A408 

15 A422 



P.M. (cont.) 

Linear Programming and Game Mr. Hall 

Theory 

Probability II Mr. Flaspohlcr 

Aural Theory Mr. Wilt 

Composition Mrs. Priesing 

Instrumentation and Techniques for Dr. Asterita 

Biological Science (5:00-9:10) 

Advanced Theoretical Organic Chcm- Mr. Flynn 

istry (Also meets Thursday) 

Sociology of Poverty (Section I) Mr. Kleinberg 



V 161 

V 163 
M 013 
M 015 

V 359 

F 204 

H 004 



P.M. 



Accounting I (Also meets Thursday) 
Literature of the American Renais- 
sance (Also meets Thursday) 

Fundamentals of Speech (Section II) 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to the Visual Arts 

(6:30-10:00) 

Foundations of Industry-Wood 

(6:30-10:00) 

Beginning Spanish II (Also meets 

Thursday) 

Beginning Italian II (Also meets 

Thursday) 

Mathematics Related to the Social 

and Management Sciences I (Also 

meets Thursday) 

Three Centuries of Science Progress 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Selected Topics in American History 

since 1876 (Also meets Thursday) 

Economic History of the United 

States (Also meets Thursday) 



P.M. 



15 A441 


15 A451 


15 A516 


15 A532 


15 A551 


15 A583 



Selection and Utilization of A-V 

Materials 

The Historical and Philosophical 

Foundations of Education 

(Section I) 

Conservation Education 

Guidance for the Classroom Teacher Staff 

School Finance 

Principles of Curriculum 

Development 

Organization and Administration of Staff 

Reading Programs 

Educational Guidance Dr. Davis 



Staff 


C 


319 


Staff 


C 


224 


Staff 


K 


129 


Mr. DeLeeuvv 


L 


229 


Mr. Schumm 


F 


118 


Mr. Elian 


H 


014 


Mr. Battista 


H 


012 


Mr. Gottschall 


V 


154 


Mr. Minor 


V 


262 


Staff 


C 


301 


Staff 


H 


007 


Staff 


C 


121 


Staff 


H 


013 


Staff 


B 


002 


Staff 


H 


Oil 


Dr. Merlo 


S 


102 


Mr. Salt 


C 


113 



C 109 



B 003 



Spring Schedule 103 



Number 


Course Title 


Instructor 


Bldg. 


Rm. 


TUESDAY 7:30 (P.M. (cont.) 








20 A529 


Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman 


Dr. Healey 


B 


005 


21 A563 


Scenery Design and Construction 


Mr. MacConnell K 


230 


24 A445A or B 


Life Drawing 


Staff 


L 


230 


or C or D 










24 A531AorB 


Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture 


Mr. McCreath 


L 


129 


or C or D 










26 A530 


Management of Family Resources 


Mrs. Alcaro 


F 


105 


28 A321 


Industrial Drafting 


Mr. Goodall 


R 


001 


28 A463 


Metal Technology 


Mr. Savage 


F 


119 


50 A571 


Curriculum Construction in 
Mathematics 


Mr. Walsh 


V 


163 


60 A413 


Masters of the Symphony 


Mr. Zerbe 


L 


135 


65 A561 


Developmental Psychology 

(Section I) 


Dr. Duryea 


B 


004 


65 A565 


Psychology and Education of the 
Socially and Emotionally Handi- 
capped Children 


Dr. Hauer 


H 


008 


76 A575 


Foundations and Interpretation of 
Physical Education 


Dr. Wacker 


P 


005 


83 A530 


Advanced Mathematical Physics 


Staff 


V 


259 


84 A504 


Advanced Historical Geology 


Mr. Ramsdell 


C 


305 


91 A405 


Psychological Anthropology 


Dr. Quintana, 










Dr. Floyd 


C 


226 


94 A527X 


Economic Development of Europe 


Dr. Barker 


C 


228 


96 A565 


Community Resources and Youth 
(Section 1) 


Mr. Kleinberg 


H 


004 


TUESDAY 8:00 P.M. 








11 A417 


Marketing (Also meets Thursday) 


Staff 


C 


310 


20 A105 


Composition and Literature I (Sec- 


Staff 


C 


319 



tion II) (Also meets Thursday) 
20 A106 Composition and Literature II (Sec- Staff 

tion II) (Also meets Thursday) 
46 A200B Intermediate Spanish II (Also meets Staff 

Thursday) 
65 AlOO General Psychology (Section II) Staff 

(Also meets Thursday) 
65 A202 Adolescent Psychology (Also meets Staff 

Thursday) 

94 All 8 Development of Classical Civilization Staff 

(Also meets Thursday) 
94 AI21 Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815 Staff 

(Also meets Thursday) 

WEDNESDAY 4:00 P.M. 

30 301 Reference arid Bibliography I (4:00- Miss Gibson 

5:40) (Also meets Monday) (Meets 
from February 2 to April 6) 



104 Spring Schedule 



Number 



Course Title 



Instructor Rklg. Rni. 

Miss Gibson S 102 



Mr. Haupt 



Dr. Gregg 



1 



15 A602 

15 A603 Principles and Practices of Research 

15 A659 Research Seminar in Reading 

40 A401X Methods of Teaching Foreign Lan- 

guages in Secondary Schools 
50 A522 Real Variables II 

50 A 57 3 Mathematics Materials for the 

Teacher of Mathematics 
90 A410 Newspaper in the Classroom 

93 A421X Population Problems of the World 
96 A568X Sociolog)' of Poverty (Section II) 

WEDNESDAY 6:30 P.M. 

10 A306 Legal Environments in Business II 

(Also meets Monday) 
20 A105 Composition and Literature I 

(Section I) (x'Mso meets Monday) 

20 A106 Composition and Literature II 

(Section I) (Also meets Monday) 

21 A204 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

(Also meets Monday) 

41 AlOOB Beginning French II 

(Also meets Monday) 
65 AlOO General Psychology (Section I) 

(Also meets Monday) 
83 AlOO Introduction to Phvsical Science 

(6:30-10:00) (Also meets Monday) 

94 AlOO The Study of American Histon.' 

(Also meets Monday) 
96 AlOO The Sociological Perspective 

(Also meets Monday) 

WEDNESDAY 7:30 P.M. 

10 A435 Unit Record Equipment I 

10 A 5 26 Advanced Business Law Cases 



B 002 



WEDNESDAY, 4:00 P.M. (cont.) 

50 302 Reference and Bibliography II (4:00- 

5:40) (Also meets Monday) (Meets 
April 8 to May 25) 

WEDNESDAY 4:30 P.M. 

65 A563 Theories of Learning (4:30-7:00) 

WEDNESDAY 5:00 P.M. 

11 A419 Merchandise Information 

15 A509 Medical Problems in Education 

15 A520 Administration of the Modern Sec- 

ondary School (Section I) 
15 A588 Techniques of Inter\iewing and 

Counseling (Section I) 
Research Seminar in Guidance 



Dr. Hecht 


C 


310 


Dr. Williams 


C 


228 


Staff 


S 


101 



B 003 



Dr. Gelfond, 






Dr. Davis 


B 


004 


Staff 


C 


309 


Miss Schantz 


C 


109 


Mrs. Knecht 


C 


117 


Dr. Chai 


\^ 


161 


Dr. Maletsky 


V 


154 


Mr. Grieco 


C 


301 


Staff 


C 


226 


Mr. Schreiber 


H 


004 


Dr. Haas 


C 


321 


Staff 


C 


319 


Staff 


C 


224 


Staff 


K 


129 


Mr. Segent 


C 


113 


Staff 


F 


105 


Staff 


\^ 


259 


Staff 


H 


007 


Staff 


C 


305 


Staff 


C 


108 


Dr. Haas 


C 


228 


Spring Schedule 


105 



Number 


Course Title 


Instructor 


Bldg. 


Rm. 


WEDNESDAY, 7:30 P.M. (cont.) 








11 A554 


Workshop in Problems of 
Distributive Education 


Dr. Hecht 


C 


310 


15 A421 


The School in American Society 
(Section II) 


Staff 


H 


013 


15 A423 


Teaching in Urban Schools 


Staff 


C 


117 


15 A445 


Developing Curriculum Guides and 
Materials for Environmental Educa- 
tion Programs 


Staff 


S 


102 


15 A503 


Methods and Instruments of Research 
(Section III) 


Dr. Heiss 


c 


309 


15 A510 


Introduction to Educational 
Administration (Section II) 


Dr. Mosier 


c 


301 


15 A582 


Vocational Guidance 


Dr. Kenyon 


B 


003 


15 A585 


Group Guidance and Counseling 
Activities (Section I) 


Staff 


B 


004 


15 A601E 


Workshop in Education: Psychology- 
Sex Education 


Dr. Runden 


C 


304 


20 A540 


Yeats, Eliot, and Pound 


Mr. Rich 


H 


Oil 


21 A531 


Advanced Audiology 


Mr. Dunlap 


K 


230 


24 A411 


History of American Art 


Mrs. Schiebel 


L 


209 


24 A511A or 


Painting 


Mr. Barnet 


L 


225 


B or C or D 










24 A553A or 


Lithography 


Mr. Vernacchia L 


228 


B or C or D 










28 A504 


Supervision of Industrial Arts 


Dr. Frankson 


F 


106 


29 A441 


Instructional Material Development 
in Vocational-Technical Education 


Staff 


F 


226 


50 A569 


Applied Mathematics II 


Dr. Parzynski 


V 


163 


65 A566 


Psychology and Education of the 
Gifted 


Dr. Shapiro 


H 


008 


73 A526 


Curriculum Development in Health 
Education 


Dr. Redd 


P 


005 


80 A409 


Sr. High Physical Science 
Demonstrations 


Mr. Placek 


V 


265 


83 A431 


Theoretical Physics I, Advanced 
Mechanics 


Mr. Hodson 


F 


201 


91 A531 


Living Races 


Mrs. Tatkon 


C 


226 


96 A565 


Community Resources and Youth 


Mr. Schreiber 


H 


004 



(Section II) 



WEDNESDAY 8:00 P.M. 



10 

20 



A202 
A223 



Staff 
Staff 



20 A437 



21 AlOO 



Accounting II (Also meets Monday) 

Myth and Literature 

(Also meets Monday) 

Victorian Prose and Poetry Staff 

(Also meets Monday) 

Fundamentals of Speech (Section I 

(Also meets Monday) 



Staff 



106 Spring Schedule 



Number 



Course Tit 



Instructor Bide. Ri 



WEDNESDAY 8:00 P.M. (cent.) 

41 A200B Intermediate French II 

(Also meets Monday) 
50 A112 Mathematics Related to the Social 

and Management Sciences II 

(Also meets Monday) 
84 AlOl Geology (Also meets Monday) 

94 x-MOl The Study of European Historv- 

(Also meets Monday) 
94 A424 Diplomatic History of Europe 

(Also meets Monday) 

THURSDAY 9:00 A.M. 

65 A 5 74 Individual Intelligence Testing 

(Section II) 

THURSDAY 4:00 P.M. 

15 A557 Corrective and Remedial Reading: 

Part II, Treatment (4:00-6:30) 
Fundamentals of Cataloging and 
Classification (4:00-5:15) 
(Also meets Tuesday) 



Mrs. Scrgcnt 


C 


in 


Mr. Wolff 


F 


105 


Staff 


C 


305 


Staff 


H 


007 



Staff 



Staff 



30 303 



THURSDAY 4:30 
65 A560 

65 A 590 



P.M. 



Advanced Educational Psvchology 
(Section II) (4:30-7:00) ^ 
Diagnostic Case Studies I 
(4:30-7:00) 



[THURSDAY 5:00 P.M. 

10 A530 Business Education in Post-High 

School Institutions 
15 A520 Administration of the Modern 

Secondary School (Section II) 
15 A 540 Supervision of Instruction 

15 A588 Techniques of Interviewing and 

Counseling (Section 11) 
15 A605 Research Seminar in School Social 

Work 
21 A592X Areas and Techniques of Research 

in Speech and Dramatics 
26 A 520 Dynamics of Family Interaction 

41 A 544 The Contemporary Novel I 

46 A 5 50 Spanish-American Theater 

50 A460 Introduction to Applied Mathematics 

50 A 5 60 Numerical Analysis I 

81 A 502 Insect Ecolog\' and Behavior 

82 A531 Advanced Theoretical Organic 
Chemistrv- (Also meets Tuesday) 

94 A526X Russia before the Revolution 



Dr. Simon 

Staff 

Staff 
Staff 

Dr. Williams 

Dr. Lcight 

Staff 

Dr. Klibbc 
Dr. Rivera 
Mr. Lacatena 
Mr. Nettlcr 
Dr. Shubeck 
Mr. Flynn 

Dr. Cohen 



B 002 



S 102 



Miss Schantz C 

Staff S 

Mrs. Wagner C 

Dr. Kraemer B 



Spring Schedule 



109 
101 

310 
002 

321 
102 

004 

003 

005 

230 

105 
226 
11" 
161 
163 
353 
204 

228 
107 



Number 


Course Title 


Instructor I 


Mg. 


Rm. 


THURSDAY 6:30 


P.M. 








10 A201 


Accounting I (Also meets Tuesday) 


Staff 


C 


319 


20 A226 


Literature of the American 
Renaissance (Also meets Tuesday) 


Staff 


C 


224 


21 AlOO 


Fundamentals of Speech (Section II) 
(Also meets Thursday) 


Staff 


K 


129 


28 A496 


Jewelry Making and Lapidary 
(6:30-10:00) 


Mr. Dorner 


F 


118 


46 AlOOB 


Beginning Spanish II 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


Mr. Elian 


H 


014 


49 AlOOB 


Beginning Italian II 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


Mr. Battista 


H 


012 


50 Alll 


Mathematics Related to the Social 
and Management Sciences I 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


Mr. Gottschall 


V 


154 


80 A418 


Three Centuries of Science Progress 
(Also meets Tuesday) 


Mr. Minor 


V 


262 


94 A112 


Selected Topics in American History 
since 1876 (Also meets Tuesday) 


Staff 


C 


301 


94 A213 


Economic History of the United 
States (Also meets Tuesday) 


Staff 


H 


007 



THURSDAY 7:30 P 
15 A422 



15 A431 
15 A492 
15 A503 

15 A541 

15 A555 

15 A585 

15 A678 

20 A519A 

24 A406A or B 

24 A521A or 

B or C or D 
26 A603 

28 A483 
46 A505 
50 A470 

60 A450 
65 A567 



M. 

Historical and Philosophical Staff 

Foundations of Education 

(Section II) 

Individual and Group Dynamics Staff 

Comparative Education Dr. Peckham 

Methods and Instruments of Research Dr. Heiss 

(Section IV) 

Supervision in Special Fields Staff 

(Section II) 

Case Studies of Reading Difficulties: Miss Baker 

Part II, Treatment 

Group Guidance and Counseling Dr. Gregg 

Activities (Section II) 

Techniques of Evaluation Dr. Gelfond 

Myth: Origin and Development Mrs. Barrett 

Photography: A Contemporary Dr. Martens 

Art Form 

Sculpture Mr. De Leeuw 

Advanced Studies in Home Miss Ruslink 

Economics 

Power Technology Mr. Teryek 

History of the Spanish Language Mr. Gloeckner 

Teaching of Mathematics — Mr. Peters 

Senior High School 

Music Typography Staff 

Abnormal Psychology Dr. Brower 



108 Spring Schedule 



Xumbcr 



Title 



Instructor Bldg. Rm. 



Staff 



iTURDAY 10:30 A.M. 

15 A501 Tests and Measurements in 

Secondar\' Education 
20 A523 William Blake 

50 A 5 74 Problem Analysis in Secondary- 

Mathematics 



Dr. Lang 



163 



THURSDAY, 7:30 P.M. (cont.) 

80 A401 The Teaching of Science in 

Secondary Schools 

81 A413 Economic Botany 

94 A434X The American Revolution and 

Early Republic, 1763-1828 

95 .\404 Government and Politics of the 

Far East 

THURSDAY 8:00 P.M. 

11 A417 Marketing (Also meets Tuesday) 

20 A105 Compositoin and Literature I 

(Section II) (Also meets Tuesday) 
20 A106 Composition and Literature II 

(Section II) (Also meets Tuesday) 
46 A200B Intermediate Spanish II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
65 A 100 General Psychology (Section II) 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
65 A202 Adolescent Psychology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
94 All 8 Development of Classical Civilization 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
94 A121 Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

l^'RIDAY 9:00 A.M. 

65 A 568 Psychology of Group Dynamics 

SATURDAY 8:30 A.M. 

15 A 50 3 Methods and Instruments of Research 

20 A603 English Research Writing 

(8:30-11:00) 
50 A416 Elements of Finite Mathematics 

(X.S.F. Students only) 
65 A 561 Developmental Psychology 

(Section II) 
65 A 5 76 Projective Techniques II 

90 A492 Studies in American Life — the West 



Mrs. Amy 


F 


209 


Dr. Rover 


C 


226 


Mr. Johnson 


C 


228 


Staff 


C 


310 


Staff 


C 


319 


Staff 


C 


224 


Staff 


H 


014 


Staff 


H 


012 


Staff 


H 


007 


Staff 


C 


301 


Staff 


\' 


154 


Dr. Brown 


S 


102 


Dr. Lang 


c 


310 


Mr. Roberts 


c 


309 


Mr. Koellner 


V 


154 


Dr. Seidman 


c 


228 


Dr. Seymour 


s 


102 


Mr. Bve 


c 


226 



C 310 



Dr. Schwegcl C 226 
Mr. Garfunkcl \' H4 



Spring Schedule 109 



PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

A. PURCHASE OF PARKING DECALS 

1. During the process of registration, students who intend to park on campus will be required 
to fill out a vehicle registration form. At that time appropriate decals may be purchased. The 
charge will be $10.00 for decals purchased in the Fall or Spring (valid for Fall, Spring, and 
Summer) and $5.00 for decals purchased in the Summer (valid for Summer only). 

2. All decals are based on a one-year period beginning September 1 and terminating August 31. 
Traffic and Parking Regulations are in effect 24 hours a day. 

3. Students who wish to drive more than one auto may obtain a second decal. The second and any 
additional decal may be purchased for $1.00 but the student must register both autos under 
his name and under no condition may both vehicles be parked on the Campus at the same 
time. Non-compliance with these conditions will constitute a violation and will be subject to 
fine according to the regulations below. 

B. PURCHASE OF DECALS 

1. Requests for decals will be honored only upon the presentation of accurate information about 
the license number, description and ownership of the vehicle. 

2. Decals are not transferable and must be removed in the event of: 

a. Change of ownership. 

b. Termination of association with the college. 

c. Termination of authorized period for which decal was issued. 

3. An appropriate decal shall be displayed on the left rear, side window of all student vehicles 
on or before the first day of classes each term. 

C. PARKING REGULATIONS 

Failure to observe any of the following regulations shall constitute a violation which will be 
processed according to the provisions under "VIOLATIONS". 

1. Autos must properly display a current decal only. (Decals must be affixed according to the 
instructions on the back of the decal.) 

2. Autos must be parked in observance of the following zones: 

a. Faculty parking only (posted signs and/or large "F" stenciled on pavement) for cars dis- 
playing faculty and staff decals (effective 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). 

b. Visitor parking only (posted). A visitor is considered to be a person who is not employed by i 
the college or registered with the college. 

c. Regular parking (unmarked spaces) for cars displaying appropriate decals as described above, i 

3. Autos parked under any of the following conditions are subject to a fine according to provisions 
under "VIOLATIONS". 

a. In "No Parking" areas which are posted or marked on the curbing. 

b. On lawns cultivated grass areas. 

c. In front of or obstructing driveways, crosswalks or delivery areas. 

d. Within the regular parking areas but in such a way as to impede traffic. 

e. Over or on the lines of the designated parking spaces. 

Regulations pertaining to moving violations: 

a. Exceeding the posted speed limit of 15 miles per hour. 

b. Failure to observe stop signs. 

4. Overnight parking is not permitted. Any exception to this rule must be requested through the 
Traffic Coordinator's office. 

5. In case of snow storms all personnel at the College must remove their cars from the Campus i 
so that efficient snow removal may be affected. 

6. Accidents: A report of all accidents involving motor vehicles on college property is to be sent 
to the Traffic Coordinator at the earliest possible moment, 

D. VIOLATIONS 

Any infractions of the regulations as contained herein will constitute a violation and will be disposec 
of as follows: 

1. A sum of $5.00 payable at the Traffic Coordinator's Office will be charged for each violation. 

2. More than five infractions will jeopardize the students standing with the college. 

3. Students may appeal violations to the Student Appeal Board. 

4. Montclair State College will withhold the grades and/or deny registration to any student whc 
has failed to dispose of outstanding violations. 



110 Parking and Traffic Regulations 












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1970 
1971 



g/taduate & unde/tg/iaduate 




EVENING DIVI 



9bl 



N 



^lONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

UPPER MONTCLAIRiEW JERSEY 




,^W 



EVENING DIVISION CALENDAR 1970-1971 



ZJ-ali ^e 



e me J let 



1970 Cfa.. ScUufe 



July 27 — August 12 

Mail registration. See page 28. 

September l4 and 15 

Registration with late registration through 
September 19. Mail registration will pre- 
cede these dates. 

September 17 
Classes Begin. 

October 14 and 17 

Comprehensive Examinations. (See page 
13.) 

October 2 1 

End of the lirst third of the semester. 

November 14 

Midpoint of the semester. 

November 15 

Last day to hie for June M.A. Degree Con- 
ferment. 

November 23 through 29 
Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 20 through January 3 
Christmas Vacation. 

January 4 

Classes Resume. 

January 23 

Last Day of Classes — Fall Semester. 



Mondays 

September 21, 28— October 5, 12, 19, 26— 
November 2, 9, 16, 30 — December 7, 14 — 
January 4, 11, 18. 

Tuesdays 

September 22, 29— October 6, 13, 20, 27— 
November 3, 10, 17— December 1,8, 15— 
January 5, 12, 19. 

Wednesdays 

September 23, 30— October 7, 14, 21, 28— 
November 4, 11, 18 — December 2, 9, 16 — 
January 6, 13, 20. 

Thursdays 

September 17, 24— October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 
— November 12, 19 — December 3, 10, 17 
— January 7, 14, 21. 

Saturdays 

September 19, 26— October 3, 10, 17, 24, 
31 — November 14, 21 — December 5, 12, 
19— January 9, 16, 23. 



Spring ^emeiter Ly / i. i^iass Schedule 






November 30 — December 20 


Mondays 






Mail registration. See page 28. 


February 1, 8, 15, 22— March 1, 8, 


. 15, 


22 


January 25 and 26 


29— April 19, 26— May 3, 10, 17 


, 24 




Registration with late registration through 


Tuesdavs 






January 30. Mail registration will precede 


February 2, 9, 16, 23— March 2, 9, 


, 16, 


23, 


these dates. 


30— April 13, 20, 27— May 4, 11, 


, 18. 




February 1 


Wednesdays 






Classes Begin. 


February 3, 10, 17, 24— March 3, 


10, 


17, 


March 6 


24, 31— April 14, 21, 28— May 5, 


12, 


19. 


End of the first third of the semester. 


Thursdays 






March 10 and 13 


February 4, 11, 18, 25— March 4, 


11, 


18, 


Comprehensive Examinations. (See page 


25— April 1, 15, 22, 29— May 6, 


13, 


20. 


13.) 


Saturdays 






March 15 


February 6, 13, 20, 27— March 6, 


13, 


20, 


Last day to file for August M.A. Degree 


27— April 3, 17, 24— May 1, 8, 


15, 


22. 


Conferment. 








March 27 








Mid-point of the semester. 








April 4 through 12 








Spring Recess. 








April 13 








Classes Resume. 








May 24 








Last Day of Classes — Spring Semester. 








June 6 






, 


Commencement. 




1 


II 


July 1 






■ 


Last day to file for January 1972 M.A. De- 




1 


■ 


gree Conferment. 




i 


1 



NOTICE: The program, requirements and instructors set forth in this bulletin are necessaril 
subject to change without notice at any time at the discretion of the administratio? 



ening Division 



DNTCLAIR 

ATE 

OLLEGE 



Upper Montclair 

New Jersey 



7 & Spring Semesters 



1970-1971 



Contents 

& Page 

Administration 

and 

Faculty 

4-9 



Undergraduate 

and Graduate 

Programs 

10-13 



Certification 

Information 

13-17 



Academic 

Regulations 

18-20 



General 

Information 

21-25 



Registration 

Information 

26-33 



Course 

Offerings 

36-86 



Fall 

and Spring 

Schedules 

87-120 



June 1970 



Number 3 



Parking 

and Traffic 

Regulations 

124 




Best Routes to 
Upper Montclair, New Jersey 




HOW TO GET TO MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

Location 

Montclair State College is on Valley Road and Normal Avenue, Upper Mont- 
clair (Turn at the light). The College is one mile south of the junction of 
Route 3 and 46 on Valley Road. 

Directions For Reaching the College 

From Bloomfield Avenue, Montclair Center (Sear's store) proceed north on 
[Valley Road — two miles to the Normal Avenue light. 

Heading East on Route 46, the landmark is West's Diner; take the next 
right, Valley Road — one mile to light at Normal Avenue. 

Heading West on Route 46, the landmark is the junction with Route 3. 
'urn on Valley Road to Montclair, bear right on clover-leaf and proceed south 
ider Route 46 — one mile to the light at Normal Avenue. 

From the Turnpike North of Exit 1 1 or South of George Washington 
ge turn at Route 3 West or Route 46 West, then as above. From the Turn- 
ike South of Exit 11, leave the Turnpike at Exit 10 and follow directions for 
rden State Parkway North. 
Heading North on the Garden State Parkway, turn left at Exit 153B and 
)ix)ceed west on Route 3 to Valley Road. 

Heading South on the Garden State Parkway, turn at Route 46 West (Clifton 
ixit 154) then to Valley Road. If you miss that turn, continue South to Exit 151, 
^atchung Avenue, then west to Valley Road and North to light at Normal 
Lvenue. 

The No, 60 Public Service Bus from Newark to Montclair terminates at the 
mchwest end of the campus. 

The No. 76 Trackless Transit Bus runs from the Southwest end of the cam- 
to Bloomfield Avenue along Grove Street and connects at Bloomfield with 

To. 64 to the Oranges. 

The No. 66 DeCamp Bus from New York, which leaves on the half hour 

[cm Platform 73, Port Authority Bus Terminal, stops at Valley Road and Mr. 

[ebron Road — one long block from the campus. 

The Erie Railroad, Montclair Heights Station, is at the Southwest corner of 
ke campus. 



WHEN IN DOUBT 
Call 

746-9500— Area Code 201 



{|^ 




i 

Montclair State College is fully accredited by the Middle States Associatioi 
of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is also fully accredited by the Nationa 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education with the Master's Degree as th 
highest degree approved. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

Dr. W. Lincoln Hawkins, Chairman 
Dr. Peter F. Drucker Mr. Bernard M. Hartnett, Jr. 

Dr. Henry Dyer Mr. Gerald A. LeBoff 

Dr. Edythe Jones Gaines Mrs. Katherine K. Neuberger 

Dr. Raymond W. Young Dean William C Warren, Vice-chairmah 

Dr. Thomas H. Richardson, ex officio 
Mr. James W. Cottingham, Administrative Assistant to the Board 

4 Board of Trustees 



COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas H. Richardson, Ed.D., LL.D PresideiU 

Allan Morehcad, Ed.D Executive Vice President and Provost 

k Walter L. Hcilbronncr, Ph.D. Vice-President of the Division of Instruction 
Vincent B. Calabrese, M.Ed. . Vice President for Business and Financial Services 
Francesco Cordasco, Ed.D Vice Provost, Information Services 

George G. King, Ed.D Vice Provost, Community Relations 

Laurence Bellagamba, Ed.D Dean, School of Education 

Samuel Pratt, Ph.D Dean, School of Fine and Performing Arts 

Philip S. Cohen, Ph.D Dean, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Lawton W. Blanton, M.A Dean of Students 

L. Howard Fox, Ph.D Chairman, Graduate Council 

Robert E. Mac Vane, M.Ed Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

Vlarshall A. Butler, M.A Associate Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

^axine R. Bullard, B.A Assistant Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 
erry T. Ice, M.A. . . Assistant Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

oseph A. Mauro, M.Ed Assistant Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

Laymond C. Van Benschoten, M.Ed. . Assistant Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

arolyn Bevilockway, M.A Evening Division Counselor 

Patricia Fries, M.A Counselor and Certification Advisor 

y B. Gavagan, B.S.L Evening Division Counselor 

mone C Picard, M.A Certification and M.A.T. Advisor 

arvin Spears, B.S Evening Division Counselor 

orman E. Lange, Ed.D Director of Student Teaching and Placement 

ter P. Stapay, M.Ed Registrar 

hn R. Beard, D.L.S Head Librarian 



[ichard J. Barker 
eph F. Becker 
rl C. Davis 
itherine B. Hall 
erbert J. Hauer 
ad Hamdan 
irry H. Hoitsma 
^lene Klibbe 
ah K. Koditschek 
larles H. Martens 



GRADUATE COUNCIL 

L. Howard Fox, Chairman 
Clyde W. McElroy 
Matt Merfeld 
Louis C Nanassy 
Earl K. Peckham 
James Pettegrove 
Bertha B. Quintana 
Eloisa Rivera-Rivera 
Jack Sacker 
Harold Scholl 
Hazel Wacker 
Ralph Walter 



John R. Beard, ex officio 

Jerry T. Ice, ex officio 

Robert E. MacVane, 
ex officio 

Simone C. Picard, 
ex officio 

Thomas H. Richardson, 
ex officio 

Maria Schantz, 
ex officio 

Luanne Miller, Recorder 



Administration 5 



FACULTY 

Fall and Spring Semesters, 1970-1971 

Thomas H. Richardson, Ed.D President 

Allan Morehead, Ed.D Executive Vice-President and Provost 

Robert E. Mac Vane, M.Ed Director of Evening Division and Summer Session 

Edward Ambry, Ph.D Education 

Robert J. Atkins, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Harry Balfe II, J.D Political Science 

Howard Ballwanz, M.A Geography 

Clara L Barbeito, Ph.D Spanish 

Richard J. Barker, Ph.D Chairman, Department of History 

Jeannine Barrett, M.A English 

Italo Battista, M.A Chairman, Department of Spanish and Italian Languages 

Joseph F. Becker, Ed.D Chemistry 

Muriel R. Becker, M.A English 

John T. Bell, M.A History 

Laurence Bellagamba, Ed.D Dean, School of Education 

George Bernstein, M.A Educatior, 

Joan Bernstein, M.A Home Economics 

Bertrand Boucher, M.A Chairman, Department of Geography 

George E. Brantl, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Philosophy 

Mary Bredemeier, M.A Educatiofi\ 

Thomas Bridges, M.A Philosophy 

Daniel Brower, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Psychology 

Martin Brown, Ed.D Psychology 

Joseph Brunner, M.A Education 

Dorothy Chesnut, M.L.S Library Sciena 

Alden Coder, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

William Cuff, M.A Education 

John Czerkowicz, M.A Fine Art 

Gert L. Daniels, Ed.D Biolog 

Myrna Danzig, M.A Education 

Earl Davis, Ph.D Education 

Leon de Leeuw, M.A Fine Art 

John Donaruma, M.A Educatio: 

Robert F. Dorner, M.A Industrial Education and Technolog i 

Arthur W. Earl, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Industrial Education an< 

Technolog \ 

Steven C. L. Earley, Ph.D Englis \ 

Gladys B. Ellenbogen, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Economic 

Doris Engelhard, Ed.D Musi\ 

Roswell Ewart, Ph.D NS.F, Program: Chemistii 

Victoria Filas, M.A Physics/Earth Scienc] 

Roland R. Flynn, M.A N.S.F. Program: Chemisttj 

Carl E. Frankson, Ph.D Industrial Education and Technolog[ 

M. Herbert Freeman, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Business Studi 

Paul E. Froehlich, Ed.D Business Studi{ 

6 Faculty 



Joan Gaeng, M.A Education 

Andrew Gallopo, Ph.D N.S.F. Program: Chemistry 

Robert Garfunkcl, M.A Mathematics 

Dorothy B. Garland, M.S Psychology 

Irwin Gawley, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Chemistry 

Elizabeth Geiss, M.A Fine Arts 

Abraham Gelfond, Ph.D Education 

Johr Girt, Ph.D Mime 

Elsie Gibson, M.LS Library Science 

Paul B. Gloeckner, M.A Spanish 

Harrison Goodall, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Alfred Gorman, Ed.D Education 

Donald Gregg, Ed.D Education 

Richard Grey, M.A Education 

George H. Gugel, M.S Mathematics 

Lois Guthrie, M.S Home Economics 

Howard L. Haas, Ed.D Business Studies 

Ronald Haas, Ed.D Education 

Katharine B. Hall, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Home Economics 

Dean Hamdan, M.A Physics/Earth Sciences 

Charles Hamilton, Ph.D Physics /Earth Science 

Jay Hand, M.A Business Studies 

Herbert J. Hauer, Ph.D Psychology 

Edward J. Haupt, Ph.D Psychology 

Eleanor C. Healey, Ph.D English 

Joseph C. Hecht, Ed.D Distributive Education 

George Heiss, Ed.D Education 

Sophia Hinshalwood, M.A Geography 

Harry H. Hoitsma, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

George A. Horn, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

Gilbert O. Hourtoule, Ph.D Chairm.an, Departm-ent of Political Science 

Edward Johnson, Ph.D Political Science 

Perqr E. Johnston, M.A English 

Bernard Kahn, M.A Eine Arts 

Gilbert Kahn, Ed.D Business Studies 

Avram Kampf, Ph.D Eine Arts 

James P. Keenen, III, M.A History 

Lawrence Kenyon, Ed.D Education 

Helene Klibbe, Ph.D Chairman, Department of French 

Leah K. Koditschek, Ph.D Biology 

Glenn Koegel, M.A Mathematics 

William G. Koellner, M.A Mathematics 

Walter E. Kops, M.A History 

Stephen Kowalski, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Physics/ Earth Science 

Doris R. Kramer, Ph.D Psychology 

Sidney J. Kronish, Ph.D Economics 

S. Marie Kuhnen, Ph.D Chairman, Department of Biology 

Richard Kyle, M.A Fine Arts 

Faculty 7 



Gerhard Lang, Ph.D Education 

Peter F. Macaluso, M.A History 

Charles H. Martens, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Fine Arts 

William McCreath, M.F.A Fine Arts 

Clyde W. McElroy, Ed.D Speech and Theater 

Morris G. McGee, Ed.D English 

George Menake, M.A Political Science 

Frank Merlo, Ed.D Education 

Thomas Millard, M.A,M.S Education 

Edward Mills, M.A Education 

Karl R. Moll, M.A Speech and Theater 

Ward Moore, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Music 

Lois A. More, Ed.D History 

Dorothy Morse, Ph.D Music 

Earl Mosier, Ph.D Education 

Margaret Mukherjee, M.S Home Economics 

Louis C Nanassy, Ed.D Business Studies 

George A. Olsen, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Mario Oneglia, Ed.D Music 

William R. Parzynski, Ph.D Mathematics 

J. Raymond Paul, M.A English 

Earl Peckham, Ed.D Education 

James P. Pettegrove, M.A English 

George Placek, M.A Chemistry 

Sara Prieto, Ph.D Spanish 

Bertha B. Quintana, Ed.D Chairman, Department of Anthropology 

Sanford R. Radner, Ed.D Chairman, Department of English 

Robert Ramsdell, M.A Physics /Earth Science 

Herbert E. Reaske, M.A English 

John Redd, Ph.D Health and Physical Education 

Maynard L. Rich, Ph.D English 

Eloisa Rivera-Rivera, Ph.D Spanish 

John P. Roberts, M.A English 

George S. Rotter, Ph.D Psychology 

Helen E. Royer, Ph.D History 

Robert Ruezinsky, M.A Education 

Charity Eva Runden, Ph.D Sex Education 

Doris Ruslink, Ph.D Home Economics 

Jack Sacher, Ed.D Music 

George Salt, M.A Education 

May Sandford, Ed.D Home Economics 

Maria Schantz, M.A Education 

Joan Schleede, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

Fred C Schumm, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Douglas M. Schwegel, Ph.D English 

Jerome M. Seidman, Ph.D Psychology 

John Seymour, Ph.D Psychology 

William Shadel, M.A Music 

8 Faculty 



Abbie F. Shapiro, Ed.D Psychology 

Gladys Shcrdell, M.A Distributive Education 

Paul P. Shubeck, Ph.D Biology 

Miriam Silver, M.A Home Economics 

Max A. Sobel, Ph.D Mathematics 

Donald E. Sobolik, M.A Speech and Theater 

John Stevens, B.S Mathematics 

Robert Streetman, M.A Philosophy 

Ira R. Sugarman, Ph.D. Psychology 

Jean Talley, M.A Education 

Charles Teryek, M.A Industrial Education and Technology 

Richard W. Tews, Ph.D Chairman, Panzer School of Physical Education 

and Hygiene 

Charles Utete, M.A Political Science 

Ralph Vernacchia, M.A Eine Arts 

Hazel Wacker, Ed.D Health and Physical Education 

Ruth Ward, M.A Education 

Ernest P. Weckesser, Jr. Ph.D Chairman, Department of Speech and 

Theater Arts 

Benjamin Wilkes, Ed.D Music 

Daniel E. Williams, Ph.D Psychology 

Robert Williams, Ed.D Education 

Thomas Wilson, Ph.D N.S.F. Program: Chemistry 

Thomas Wilt, M.A Music 

Kenneth C. Wolff, M.A Mathematics 

Peter F. Worms, Ed.D Psychology 

Albert Zabady, M.A N.S.F. Program: Chemistry 



Faculty 9 



AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 

The Evening Division program is designed specifically to meet the needs 
of: 

1. Matriculated students enrolled in graduate programs who wish to meet re- 
quirements for the Master of Arts degree. 

2. Teachers-in-service who desire to complete degree requirements, to improve 
their professional standing, or to take courses for state certification purposes. 

3. Graduates from liberal arts colleges seeking certification to teach in the 
New Jersey public secondary schools. 

4. Persons interested in pursuing college work for cultural or avocational pur- 
poses whether or not they desire credit. 

5. Persons interested in special workshops, institutes, and seminars. 

6. High School graduates interested in pursuing college study for purposes of 
attaining a Bachelors degree on a part time basis at Montclair State College 
through the Evening Division and Summer Session. 

ADMISSION TO EVENING DIVISION 
STUDENTS SEEKING ADMISSION TO MONTCLAIR PROGRAMS 

Evening Undergraduate Degree Programs — Bachelor of Arts 

This undergraduate program is designed for qualified graduates from ac- 
credited high schools or qualified transfer students from other colleges interested 
in pursuing college study on a part-time basis in the evening for the degree. 
Courses are offered in the evening, leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in the 
areas of Business Studies, English, history and Industrial Arts. 

Application Procedures for Admission 
to the Evening Division Program 

I. REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR PERMISSION 
TO BEGIN COURSE WORK 

A. U.S. citizenship or proof of eligibility. 

B. Graduation from an approved four-year high school or an equivalency 
diploma. 

C File an application and supporting credentials with the Evening Division 
Be sure to enclose the required $10.00 APPLICATION FEE. Send a 
check or money order, NO CASH, payable to MONTCLAIR STATE 
COLLEGE. The necessary forms may be obtained in the Evening Division 
Office. 

D. Request your high school to send an OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT of your 
record dkectly to the Evening Division — Undergraduate Admissions. 
Please use the college form. The official high school transcript must show 
a minimum of 16 units, (a unit is a year's work in a subject). Included 
in the 16 units required for admission are English (4 units), Algebra 
(1 unit). Lab Science (1 unit), American History (PAD) (2 units), 

10 Undergraduate Programs 



F. 



Foreign Language * (2 units), and electives from the above 3 units). 
Deficiencies may be made up by completing approved high sch(X)l courses 
and/or by passing the State Equivalency Examination in the subject 
concerned. Applicants holding equivalency diplomas must submit official 
records showing the scores obtained on the General Equivalency Ex- 
aminations. 

Students with prior college experience MUST submit OFFICIAL TRAN- 
SCRIPTS directly to Evening Division — Undergraduate Admissions from 
ALL institutions attended. Failure to do so will invalidate the applica- 
tion. Students who wish to transfer credit to Montclair must also com- 
plete the COURSE DESCRIPTION form. No credits may be considered 
for transfer without a complete and accurate course description. 
Have the PERSONAL REFERENCE forms completed and forwarded to 
the Evening Division — Undergraduate Admissions. 
Veterans must submit a copy of discharge or separation papers. 



All credentials must be filed with the Evening Division Office at least 
one month prior to registration dates. When all credentials have been 
received and evaluated, the student will be notified as to his eligibility 
or inelegibility to begin course work in the Evening Division. 



11. MATRICULATION INTO A DEGREE PROGRAM 

Items A & B below may be completed at the applicant's earliest convenience, 
but they MUST be completed before matriculation will be considered. 

A. Students who have not taken the S.A.T. examination within the last five 
(5) years may take an examination given by the College. The Evening 
Division Office must be advised in writing of your intent soon after you 
have received permission to begin work at Montclair State College. 
Students who have taken the S.A.T. within the last five (5) years should 
have a copy of scores forwarded from Educational Testing Service to 
Evening Division — Undergraduate Admissions. 

B. Submit a MEDICAL REPORT signed by a physician. Use the form pro- 
vided by the college. Please be sure that both sides of the form are filled 
in completely, or the processing of your application will be delayed. 

C. Students must complete 15 semester hours of academic course work at 
Montclair State College before acceptance into a degree program will 
be considered. 

D. Students must submit the "APPLICATION FOR MATRICULATION " 
form during the semester in which they are enrolled for course work 
which brings their total to 15 semester hours of study. The required 
form may be obtained in the Evening Division Office. 

E. Students submitting the "APPLICATION FOR MATRICULATION" 
form will be requested to meet with Evening Division personnel for a 
personal interview. 

'Candidates for industrial arts may substitute 2 units in this area instead. 



Undergraduate Programs 1 1 



Graduate Degree Programs — Master of Arts 

Major Areas 

Graduate programs are offered in the following major areas: Administration 
and Supervision, Business Education, Distributive Education, English, Fine Arts, 
Foreign Languages (French and Spanish), Health Education, Home Economics, 
Industrial Education and Technology, Mathematics, Music, Outdoor Education 
and Conservation, Physical Education, Psychology, Pure and Applied Mathematics, 
Reading, Science, Social Sciences, Speech Arts, Speech Therapy and Student 
Personnel Services, including School Social Work (the visiting teacher). In addi- 
tion, a major in Teaching is also available. 

Persons Eligible 

These programs are open to teachers in service, as well as those interested in 
professional growth who hold a Bachelor's degree from an accredited college or 
university. 

Admission Procedures 

1. File an application with the Evening Division/Graduate and pay a $10.00 
application for admission fee. 

2. Have forwarded to the Evening Division/Graduate official transcripts of 
all previous college work. (Upon acceptance, a student will be furnished 
a definite statement of requirements, entitled a Work Program. The work 
program must be presented when a student registers in person.) 

3. Submit Graduate Record Examination scores. 

All applications for admission to the Graduate Program and supporting 
credentials must be postmarked on or before: 

July 15, 1970 For 1970 Fall Admission 

November 15, 1970 For 1971 Spring Admission 

April 15, 1971 For 1971 Summer Admission 

Applications received after a filing deadline will be processed in accord- 
ance with the next filing date. 

General Information 

Credit taken prior to matriculation: Not more than 8 semester hours of work 
taken at Montclair prior to matriculation may be accepted for credit toward the 
M.A. degree. 

Transfer of Credits: Transfer of graduate credit from other accredited institu- 
tions — up to 8 semester hours — may be granted at the discretion of the graduate 
advisor. Transfer of Credit forms, available in the Evening Division Office, should 
be completed prior to registration for courses at other institutions. 

Master's Thesis: 5"tudents writing a thesis must register for the course, Depart- 
mental 600, Master's Thesis, which carries 4 semester hours of credit. For further ■ 
information regarding the thesis, see the Graduate Bulletin. 
Application for Final Evaluation: This application form is obtained in the Evening j 
Division Office by the candidate anticipating the completion of the degree require- 

12 Graduate Programs 



ments. The responsibility for making application rests with the candidate. This 
form must be completed and returned before: 

November 15 for students completing requirements in the Spring Semester 

March 15 for students completing requirements by the end of the Summer 
Session 

July 1 for students completing requirements in the Fall Semester 

Students should check with advisors concerning final examination dates and other 
details involved with the graduation procedure. 

Comprehensive Examination: The October examination will not be given by all 
departments and students should consult with their advisors. The March examination 
will be given as follows: 

March 10, 7:00 pm Business Education, Distributive Education, Administra- 
tion and Supervision, Student Personnel Services, Industrial Arts. 

March 13, 9:00 am Reading, English, Home Economics, Foreign Languages, 
Mathematics, Music, Psychology, Social Science, Speech. 

Some departments will schedule oral examinations. Students should check with 
their advisors. 

It is the student's responsibility to file the "NOTIFICATION FOR COMPRE- 
HENSIVE EXAMINATION" form with the student's advisor. The form is 
available in the Evening Division Ofiice. This procedure should be completed at 
least six (6) weeks prior to the examination date in order to allow ample time for 
the department to communicate with each candidate concerning any pre-examina- 
tion procedure. Students who fail the departmental Comprehensive Examination 
are permitted to retake this examination on the next examination date and no more 
than three times. 

STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO CONSULT THE GRADUATE BULLETIN 
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION. 

Teacher Certification Program — New Jersey 

I. ENROLLING AT MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

A. Students who plan to take courses leading to certification for secondary 
and/or special subject teaching must file an Application for Admission 
form with the Evening Division at Montclair State College. The completed 
application form, ten dollars ($10.00) non-refundable application fee, 
official college transcripts, and a letter stating the subject area(s) in which 
certification is desired, must be forwarded to the Evening Division (At- 
tention: Certification Advisor) at least one month prior to the registration 
dates. Evaluation of credentials will be made by the Evening Division as 
part of the admissions procedure. 

B. Correspondence subsequently received, including the work program (Pro- 
gram Advisement Sheet), must be presented each time a student registers 
in person for a course or courses. 

Certification Information 13 



II. 



C Students interested in the combined certification and Masters of Arts with 
a major in Teaching programs should follow the same procedure as a 
Master's Degree candidate. (See page 12.) Application for the "approved 
certification program" should be completed prior to their first registration. 
However, students may complete up to eight (8) semester hours of course 
work prior to acceptance in the "approved certification program." 
Certification students who have not had an opportunity to file an applica- 
tion and are registering for the first time in the Evening Division must 
show official evidence of having earned a Bachelor's degree (e.g. under- 
graduate transcript), and/or official evidence of holding an emergency 
certificate, and/or an official evaluation from the State Board of Examiners. 

D. All general questions regarding certification should be addressed to a 
Certification Advisor (Miss Fries or Miss Picard) at the College; pre- 
registration advisement by appointment is recommended. 

E. Students wishing to file an application for a teaching certificate must follow 
the procedure outlined under IV. RULES CONCERNING TEACHING 
CERTIFICATION and METHODS OF APPLYING FOR CERTIFICA- 
TION. 

COURSE OFFERINGS 

The Professional Education courses listed below, from the Fall and Spring 
Semester schedules, are approved by the State Board of Examiners for the 
first certificate to teach in the New Jersey public secondary schools. Courses 
should be selected from the following categories: 




14 Certification Infoimation 



METHODS FALL SPRING 

10: A401 Principles and Methods of Teaching General 

Business x 

20: A471 Teaching Enghsh in the Secondary School x 

24: A302 Foundations of Method in Art Education x 

28: A402 Curriculum and Teaching of Industrial 

Education x 

28: A507 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational- 
Technical Education*+ x 

40: A401 The Teaching of Foreign Languages in 

Secondary Schools x 

40: A425 Methods and Materials of TESL x 

50: A470 Teaching Mathematics — Senior High School x 

80: A401 Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools x 

90: A401 The Teaching of Social Studies in 

Secondary Schools x 

97: A583 Methods and Materials in Teaching Speech 

to Language Impaired Children** x 

97: A570 Teaching Speech to the Hard of Hearing** x 

97: A581B Methods and Materials in Teaching Children 

with Learning Disabilities** x 



EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

65: A200 Educational Psychology++ 

65: A201 Child Psychology++ x 

65: A560 Advanced Educational Psychology x 

65: A561 Developmental Psychology x 



FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 



A424 Teacher, School, and Society 

A545 Social Forces in Education 

A548 Contemporary Educational Thought 

A549 Comparative Studies of Educational Systems 



CURRICULUM 

11: A521 Development of a Distributive Education 

Curriculum * 

15: A461 The Junior High School Curriculum 
24: A502 Curriculum Construction in Art Education 
29: A421 Curriculum Construction in Vocational- 
Technical Education + 



GUIDANCE 

15: A451 Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 



Applicable to Professional Education requirements tor Distributive Education Certification. 
-\- Applicable to Professional Education requirements for Vocational-Technical (Subject Teacher) Certifi- 
cation. 

' Applicable to certification for Teaching the Handicapped. 
•-|- For undergraduate credit and students who do not hold a Bachelor's degree or have not met pre- 
requisites for graduate-level courses in Educational Psychology. 



Certification Information 15 



III. SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING AND PLACEMENT 
SERVICES 

A. Supervised Student Teaching (15-A403) 

Students who elect student teaching under Montclair State supervision 
(Education 403 — Supervised Student Teaching) must make application 
in the semester preceding the semester in which student teaching is de- 
sired. Application forms must be filed with the Director of Student 
Teaching and Placement by November 1st for student teaching in the 
Spring semester; by May 1st for student teaching in the Fall semester. 
Applications will be accepted only after a student has successfully com- 
pleted all certification course requirements. The student teaching period 
extends full time for a period of ten consecutive weeks during the Fall 
or Spring Semester. 

Prior to filing an application for student teaching, a minimum of ten 
semester credit hours, including a course in the methods of teaching 
the specific subject for which certification is being sought, must be com- 
pleted at Montclair State College. 

B. Supervised Teaching Seminar ( 1 5-A404 & A405 ) 

In-service teachers holding emergency or provisional certificates may elect j 
Education 404 and 405— SUPERVISED TEACHING SEMINAR instead 
of Education 403. These students will be admitted to the program only 
with prior written permission of the local superintendent of schools anc 
agreement with the local school system regarding a program of joint 
supervision with Montclair State College. Unlike Education 403, the Super 
vised Teaching Seminar may be the initial course in the student's pro 
gram. Enrollment for the Seminar for Fall-Spring 1970-71 has been closec 
Requests for admission to the Seminar should be made in February oi 
the year prior to the anticipated enrollment date. 

C Placement Services 

Registration with the Placement Ofiice is open to all students who have! 
successfully completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of course work 
at Montclair and are eligible for a teaching certificate. Services of theij 
Ofiice include notification of job openings for which the applicant is 
qualified and preparation of supporting credentials. Additional informa 
tion concerning student teaching and placement may be obtained fromi 
the Director of Student Teaching and Placement. 

IV. RULES CONCERNING TEACLIER CERTIFICATION 

Every teacher in New Jersey must: 

1. Be at least eighteen years old. 

2. Be a graduate of an approved high school or have an equivalent edu 
cation or experience as determined by the State Board of Examiners 

3. Be a citizen of the United States, or have preliminary citizenshif 
status as defined by the law enacted in 1956. 

4. Hold a bachelor's degree, unless otherwise stipulated by State Boarcj 
of Examiners. 



16 Certification Information 






METHODS OF APPLYING FOR CERTIFICATION 

A. Applicants Who Have Assurance of Employment in the Public Schools 
of Neiv Jersey 

Application for certification by persons who have assurance of employ- 
ment in the public schools of New Jersey should be made by mail or in 
person through the office of the County Superintendent of Schools in the 
county in which the applicant will teach. The County Superintendent's 
offices are usually located in the county court house buildings. 

B. Applicants Who Do Not Hat " Assurance of Employment 

1. Application for certificatio. i by persons who are residents of New 
Jersey but who do not have assurance of employment and must 
complete course work to meet certification requirements should be 
made in accordance with the procedure outlined above (under 
I. ENROLLING AT MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE). 

2. Application for certification by persons who are not residents of 
New Jersey and who do not have assurance of employment should 
be made by mail directly to the Office of Teacher Education and Certi- 
fication, State Department of Education, 1 1 1 Franklin Street, Trenton, 
New Jersey, 08625. 

C. Documents Required for All Certificates 
Information concerning documents required for all certificates should 
be obtained through the office of the County Superintendent of Schools. 

D. ISSUANCE OF CERTIFICATE 

Upon satisfactory completion of an approved certification program, each 
student will submit official transcripts to and file an application for 
certification with the office of the County Superintendent of Schools (if 
employed, with County Superintendent in the county in which student is 
employed; if unemployed, with County Superintendent in county in which 
student resides). Completion of final application form, payment of fees, 
and issuance of certificates will be handled by the County Superintendent 
of Schools and the State Board of Examiners. The Montclair State College 
Evening Division must be notified by students about certification program 
completion so that files may be properly inactivated. 

ISTUDENTS NOT SEEKING ADMISSION TO MONTCLAIR PROGRAMS, 
but 

Desiring to Transfer Credit: 

Undergraduates — Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in courses for 
[the purpose of having credit transferred to another institution may be admitted by 
Jubmitting a letter from the Dean of the University or College in which the student 
[s enrolled to the Director of the Evening Division. 

Graduates — Graduate students who wish to enroll in courses for the purpose 
)f having credit transferred to another institution may be admitted under the 
|pecial student classification and must present evidence of a Bachelor's degree 
f-c registration. 

Certification Information 17 



Desiring to Pursue Special Interests: 

Undergraduates — Persons who desire to take courses for cultural, vocational 
or avocational purposes, but who do not wish to engage in a bachelor's degree pro- 
gram may enroll for course work not exceeding twelve semester hours ( nine in the 
summer) in any one semester or a total of fifteen semester hours. Students will be 
required to submit an application and receive permission to begin course work. 
After they have completed fifteen semester hours further study will be prohibited 
unless the student matriculates into an undergraduate program as described on 
page 10. 

Graduates — Any person who has received a bachelor's degree may register 
for courses at Montclair. They must present a transcript at registration in order 
to establish evidence of their degree and register as a special student (09). 

Desiring to Obtain Out-of-state Certification: 

Persons registering at Montclair and desiring to obtain certification in any 
state other than New Jersey must register as a special student desiring to pursue 
a special interest. 

Desiring to Audit: 

Persons who desire to take courses for cultural, vocational, professional or 
avocational purposes, but who do not wish college credit, may register as auditors. 
All persons auditing a course must establish eligibility, register, and pay the same 
tuition fees as other students. 




18 Certification Information 






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES 

Students Responsibility 

The College expects those who are admitted to assume responsibility for know- 
ing and meeting the various regulations and procedures set forth in the College 
catalogs. The college reserves the right to terminate the enrollment of any student 
whose conduct, class attendance, or academic record should prove unsatisfactory. 

Credit Loads 

Graduate students who are working full time may not register for more than 
three (3) courses for a maximum of nine (9) semester hours. Undergraduate 
students who are not working full time may not register for more than twelve ( 12 ) 
semester hours. A maximum of six (6) semester hours is strongly recommended 
for those undergraduate students who are employed in full time positions. 

Course Numbering 

A course numbering system has been developed for all courses in the various 
departments and curricula. Courses are numbered in the following manner: 

100-199 Freshmen 400-499 Senior-Graduate 

200-299 Sophomore 500-699 Graduate 

300-399 Junior 

Withdrawal From A Course 

A written notice to the Director of Evening Division is required. (Notifica- 
tion to the instructor does not constitute an official withdrawal.) Upon receipt of the 
written notice for withdrawal, this office will send written acknowledgement to 
the student. Any student who fails to receive such acknowledgement within the 
next two weeks, should immediately notify this office. Refunds are computed from 
the date of receipt of the written notice. Students who do not submit a written 
notice will receive the mark of "F" in those courses which they cease to attend. 
Students who withdraw after the midpoint will receive an automatic grade of "¥\ 

Withdrawal from courses that meet more than or less than a full semester is 
allowed up to midpoint of the course. 

Grades 

Only students enrolled for credit receive grades. The following final grades 
may be received: 

A Excellent B Good 

C Fair D Poor 

F Failure IN Incomplete 

WD Withdrew NC No Credit 

The mark "D" is not accepted for Master's degree credit at Montclair State 
College. The mark "WD " is given to those who submit in writing their intention 
of withdrawing from a course before the midpoint in the semester. The mark "F'" 
signifies: (1; academic failure; (2) the student has failed to submit written 
notice of his withdrawal; (3) the student has requested withdrawal after the 
midpoint in the semester. 

Academic Re^'ulations 19 



The mark "IN" is given to a student who, because of illness, is unable to 
complete the work by the end of a semester. The work must be completed by 
April 15 for incompletes received in the Fall semester and November 15 for 
incompletes received in the Spring or Summer semesters; if said work is not 
finished on the prescribed date, a final grade of "F" is recorded. For courses that 
meet more than or less than a full semester, the above information applies, but is 
geared to the duration of the course. 

An official record showing credits and grades earned will be mailed to the 
student three weeks following the close of the semester. 

Change of Schedule 

All changes in the original class schedule must be made during the regular 
or late (in person) registration periods or in the Evening Division Office following 
the registration periods. All changes incur a fee of $5.00. The deadline for 
exchanging courses is prior to the second meeting of the class in which the 
student desires to enter. To change from "audit" to "credit" or vice-versa, a student 
must make formal application not later than the midpoint of the semester. Forms 
are available in the Evening Division Office. 

Cancellation of Courses 

The College reserves the right to close any course for which the enrollment 
is insufficient. Students may then register in another course or receive a refund of 
tuition. If prerequisites are required (see course listings), the student must be 
sure he has fulfilled them or their equivalents. 

Split Sections 

Occasionally because of the demand for a course, it will be necessary to split 
the course into multiple sections. Every effort will be made to insure that the first 
registrants will have the instructor listed. 

Transcript Requests 

Students should complete the transcript request form available in the Eve- 
ning Division Office. Students making such requests in letter form must include: 
own name and address, name and address of receiver of transcript, number to be 
sent, last semester in which registered, whether there are both undergraduate and 
graduate records at Montclair. The fee is $1.00, payable in advance to Montclair 
State College. 



20 Academic Regulations 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Office Hours and Phone 

On all days when classes are scheduled, the Evening Division office hours 
are as follows: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 9:00 
p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m. ro 4:30 p.m.: Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. Phone 
746-9500, Extension 201. 

Storm Closing 

Students should assume that all courses will be held as scheduled. In case of 
storm, daytime classes may be cancelled, but Evening Division courses are usually 
held. If in doubt, telephone the College. The following radio stations will announce 
an official college closing; WCTC, WPAT, WOR, WKER. 

Student Parking 

The college maintains a number of parking lots to be used by students. These 
areas are designated on a map of the campus that is on the inside back cover of 
this announcement. Under no circumstances are students to park in unauthorized 
areas. Violators of parking regulations will be subject to towing and removal of 
their automobiles. Costs of such towing shall be paid in addition to fines. The 
College assumes no responsibility for the car or its contents while it is parked on 
College property. 

Parking decals may be obtained at registration or in the parking office 
(annex I). The charge will be S 10.00 for decals purchased in the Fall or Spring 
(valid for Fall, Spring and Summer) and $5.00 for decals purchased in the 
I Summer (valid for the Summer only). 

Veterans' Counselor 

Veterans seeking admission to the Evening Division should apply well in 
advance of the registration dates for a certificate of eligibility and entitlement at 
the Newark, New Jersey office (20 Washington Place) of the Veterans Adminis- 
tration. In requesting this certificate, the veteran is advised to indicate clearly his 
educational objective. The Veterans Administration has established certain limita- 
tions, especially with regard to change of course. In order that a veteran may be 
assured that his certificate is in order and that he has taken the proper steps to ex- 
pedite his training, under the G. I. Bill, he should report at registration time to 
the Veterans' Counselor whose office is located in College Hall. 

Campus Employment 

There are a limited number of openings for employment on Campus avail- 
able to students who are taking courses at Montclair State College. Students may 
be employed either under the Work Scholarship Program or Student Assistance 
Program, depending upon financial need. 

For further information, inquire in Room 217, College Hall, Financial Aids 
Office. 



! 



General Information 21 



SERVICES 

Academic Advisors 

Appointments with members of the Evening Division Staff and/or Faculty 
may be made by mail or telephone. Appointments should be made as early as 
possible prior to the end of the current semester. Departmental advisors are avail- 
able during hours of registration. 

Audio-Visual Center 

The Center provides audio-visual materials, equipment and services for use by 
faculty and students for classroom instruction and presentation. Video taping 
equipment is available for use by faculty and staff, as is a closed circuit television 
studio with its complementary equipment. The staff of the Center is available for 
special consultation to audio-visual problems, for demonstrations of audio-visual 
materials and methods and for special teaching and training in the area of audio- 
visual education. The Center handles the scheduling of all films for the College, 
as well as their ordering, mailing, and rental. Student assistants are provided 
whenever the use of equipment is requested but are also available for other services. 

Bookstore 

Located adjacent to the main lobby of the Student Life Building, this on- 
campus facility will be open during all hours of registration and evenings during 
the first two meetings of each class until 8:00 p.m. Thereafter, regular hours of 
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. will be in effect. 

Saturday hours during the Fall and Spring semesters are 8:00-11:00 a.m. on 
Saturdays when Evening Division classes are in session. 

Students are advised not to purchase their books until after the first meeting 
of the class. 

Health Services 

There is a registered nurse on duty in the College Health office. This office 
is located in the west wing of Russ Hall. Emergency medical care is available. 

Regular office hours are from 8 A.M. until 4 P.M. After 4 P.M. — Emergencies 
only. Between 10 P.M. and 7:45 A.M. a call must be made so that the nurse will 
open the door for you. Phone: 746-9505. 

Library 

The Harry A. Sprague Library is an attractive, modern, air-conditioned build- 
ing located centrally on the campus. Students and faculty are encouraged to use 
its comfortable facilities which include study tables, individual study desks, group 
conference rooms, faculty carrels and inviting lounge areas. Smoking lounges are 
provided on the ground floor where a typing room is also located for student use. 

A knowledgeable staff of librarians is on hand to guide students in the use of 
the Library's substantial collection of books and periodicals which is constantly 
expanding. Liberal lending regulations are designed to facilitate the students' access I 
to this collection. Two copying machines are available at nominal cost to those who 
wish to eliminate tedious note taking from printed materials in the Library. Peri- 
odicals, books and documents in microtext are accessible through the Library's | 
microfilm, microfiche and microcard readers. 

22 General Information 



The general resources of the Library are augmented by a Curriculum Labora- 
tory, a rapidly growing collection of United States and New Jersey government 
publications and special collections that include the China Institute Library, a New 
Jersey collection and four important poetry collections for special research. 

Library hours while classes are in session are as follows: 

Monday through Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

During vacation periods when classes are not in session, the library is generally 
open from 8:30 a.m.-4:40 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Student Identification-Library Card 

All students registered in the Evening Division may secure a student identifi- 
cation-library card for use of the College. This card must be requested at the Library 
and picked up in the library about three weeks after the registration. It must be 
retained by the student for use at future registrations. Initially, library privileges 
will be granted upon presentation of a current registration receipt. At all regisra- 
tions, the student will receive a gummed label validation which must be affixed 
to this identification card to establish eligibility for library use and evidence of 
being registered. A replacement fee of $L00 will be charged if this card is lost. 

Snack Bar 

Located in Student Life Building. Open Monday thru Thursday until 8:00 
p.m. Closed on Saturday. The Snack Bar is a self-supporting operation. (Hours are 
subject to change depending upon income.) 

T.U.B. 

Adding to the Life Hall facilities, T.U.B. (Temporary Union Building — 
Annex D) provides a lounge, recreation (pool, ping pong and other games) and 
T.V. area, and a snack bar where food is prepared to order. 

T.U.B. is open seven days a week: Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m.- 
11:00 p.m.; Saturday from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 midnight; and, Sunday from 12:00 
noon-10:00 p.m. 



General Information 23 



SPECIAL ACTIVITIES 
FALL AND SPRING SEMESTERS 1970-1971 
Reading Improvement Laboratory 

Available to New Jersey students from intermediate grades through high 
school; small group and individual instruction is given according to age, grade and 
achievement levels. Fall and Spring sessions meet once a week from 3:30 to 5:30 
p.m. Simimer sessions meet daily for four weeks from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. The 
latest in equipment, films, texts and workshop materials are used to demonstrate 
speed of comprehension, study techniques and vocabulary growth. Enrollment is 
limited. Apply at least three months in advance of each term. Fee: $50.00. Write to: 
Coordinator, Reading and Study-Skills Center. 

Speech and Hearing Center 

The Speech and Hearing Center offers intensive remedial speech services 
during the Fall and Spring semester for children between 3 and 18 years of age. 
Classes meet Monday through Saturday. The program provides therapy for children 
with the usual types of speech problems, as well as for those who have major 
problems of voice, articulation, and rhythm (stuttering). Qinical services are 
also provided for children with retarded language development or loss of language 
and for children who have speech problems associated with tongue thrusting, 
malocclusion, cleft palate, hearing impairments, and special learning disabilities. 

There is no charge for the therapy, but there is a $25.00 administrative charge 
for the program per semester. Admissions may follow a comprehensive diagnostic 
interview for which there is a $25.00 fee. Appointments for diagnosis may be 
arranged by calling the secretary of the Department of Speech Pathology and 
Audiology. 

SPECIAL TOUR ANNOUNCEMENTS 

CHRISTMAS TOUR 

Field Studies A467 Florida Cr. 2 s.h. 

December 23 to December 30, 1970 — Staff 

This is a field-study course covering the Florida peninsula including both 
coasts, the Everglades, and the Lake Region. Among the places visited are ancient 
St. Augustine; the winter playgrounds at Palm Beach and Miami; the Tamiami 
Trail through the Everglades; the west coast cities of Sarasota, St. Petersburg, and 
Tampa; and the Lake Region in the neighborhood of the Lake Wales and Orlando. 
The trip affords opportunity for topographical, historical, and industrial studies. 

SPRING TOUR 

Field Studies A406 Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands Cr. 2 s.h. 

April 2 to April 10, 1971— Staff 

This is an eight-day, field study course devoted to a survey of our nearest island 
possessions. It includes an exploration of San Juan and its vicinity, including the 
University and the rain forest, a two-day trip through the island, visiting pineapple, i; 
coffee, sugar, textile, and rum producing areas, churches, homes and historic places. 

24 Special Activities 



One day is spenr in St. Thomas, largest of the Virgin Islands. The trip to and from 
the islands is made by air. 

SUMMER TOUR 

Field Studies A423 The British Isles Cr. 3 s.h. 

July 10 to July 31, 1971— Staff 

This is a comprehensive overview of the British Isles, spending about a week 
each in England, Scotland, and Ireland and a day in Wales. Geographic, historical 
and literary places of interest will be visited including Cambridge, Oxford, London, 
York, Windermere, Hampton Court, Windsor Castle, Salisbury, Stonehenge, Strat- 
ford-on-Avon, and many other places in England; Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the Loch 
district in Scotland; Caernarvan and Bettws-y-Coed in Wales; Dublin, Cork, Killar- 
ney, Limerick, and Shannon in Ireland. 

Inquiries regarding these tours should be addressed to the Office of Inter- 
national and Off-Campus Learning Programs at the College. 




Special Activities 25 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

Students desiring to study through the Montclair State College Evening 
Division may register either by mail or in person. Regardless of the method chosen, 
registration must be completed in accordance with the instructions below and 
procedures described under BY-MAIL or IN-PERSON. All incomplete or incorrect 
forms received in the mail will be returned and students will have to register in 
person. 

Evening Division students registered in any one of the last three semesters 
will be sent registration forms for the Fall. Materials not used should be retained 
for future registration since materials will only be sent for the Spring to those 
registered in the Fall. Students who do not receive the materials prior to the 
registration dates should contact this office. New students may receive materials 
by requesting them in writing from the Evening Division Office, ATTN: REGR. 
Include a stamped, self-addressed envelope and indicate the degree you hold 
(if any) and the last time you registered in the Evening Division or Summer 
Session at M.S.C 



INSTRUCTIONS — ALL STUDENTS 

1. WHITE REGISTRATION FORM— (Use Ink) 

a. Correct printed inforfnation and complete information requested in Section A, 
B, C, D, & E. Use the following codes for completing Section B: 



Item 
Box No. 1 Semester Hours 
Box No. 2 Credit (or Audit) 

Box No. 3 Resident Status 



Box No. 4 



Program Number 
Only students in 
approved certification 
or degree programs 
will list department 
number. Others will 
00. 



Box No. 5 Sex 

Box No. 6 Marital Status 

Box No. 7 Status of Student 



Code and Meaning 

Enter Total No. S.H. This Semester 

. . Taking courses for credit 

. . Not taking courses for credit (i.e. Auditor) 

. . Live in N.J. 

. . . Live out of State but teaching in N.J. 

. . . Live out of State and not teaching in N.J. 



-Not in a program 
-Bus. Ed. 
-Dist. Ed. 
-Sch. Soc. Work 
-Psychology 



16 — Adm. & Super. 
17 — Stud. Pers. Set. 
18— MAT 
19 — Reading 
20— English 
21— Speech & Hrg. 
22 — Speech & Dram. 
23 — Lib. Arts-Eng. 
24— F. Arts 
26 — Home Ec. 
28— Ind. Arts 



1. . 
1. . 
01. 
XI 
02. 
03. 
04. 



Male 

Single 

Initial Cert. 

App. cert. prog. 

Pre-Matric. fM.S.C. 

Matric. M.A. <Even. 

Matric. B.A. [Div. 



30— Lib. Sci. 
40 — Lang 
41— French 
46 — Spanish 
50— Math 
5 1— Pure Math & 

Lib. Arts Math 
60 — Music 
73— Hlth. Ed. 
76— Phys. Ed. 
80 — Science 
81 — Biology 
82— Chem 
83— Physics 
90— Soc. St. 
94— Lib. Arts-Hist 



2. 
2. 
06 

07 

08 



. Female 
. Married 
Other 

Undergraduate 
Adv. 

Certification 
Endorsement 



26 Registration Procedures 



Box No. 8 Highest Degree 

Held 
Box No. 9 Certificate Held 



Box No. 10 Registration 
Period 



Box No. 11 Time Code 



Box No. 



05 



M.S.C. 

Undergraduate 



09 



10 



Salary, Equiv., o 

own Interest 

Eve. Undergrad- 

uate-Non- 

matriculated 

Master 

Doctorate 

Provisional 

Emergency 



None 2 

Bachelor 3 

None 2 

. Lim. Stand. Perm. 5 

First time registering in the Evening Division 
or Summer Session at M.S.C. 
Previously registered in the Evening Division 
or Summer Session at M.S.C. 
Part Time (Less than 12 Semester Hours) 
Full Time (12 S.H. or more) 
Yes 2 .... No 



12 Attending under 1 

G.l Bill 
Box No. 13 Attending under 1 . . . .Yes 2. . . No 

Institute 
Boxes 14, 15, & 16 — Not to he Completed by Student 
h. Complete the hack of the form. 

Enter the courses you wish to take completing all columns (section only if 
listed) that are applicable. Use the information beginning on page 87 for 
Fall and 105 for Spring. Students who need advisement may wait until they 
have met with their advisor before completing this section. 
Students registering for courses having more than one section are advised to 
list alternate choices in order of preference. 

c. Sign and Date back of form. 

RECEIPT VOUCHER— Use Ball Point Pen or Pencil 

Complete the Receipt Voucher — according to the fee information below and 
on page 32. This becomes your receipt after validation. EX) NOT DETACH. 





UNE 


ERGRAI 


3UATE 






GRADUATE 






REGISTRATION 






REGISTRATION 










Student 










Student 




No. 




Registration Union 




No. 




Registration 


Union 




S.H. 


Tuition 


Fee 


Fee 


Total 


S.H. 


Tuition 


Fee 


Fee 


Total 


1 


$ 20.00 


$2.00 


$ 1.00 


$ 23.00 


1 


$ 25.00 


$2.00 


$1.00 


% 28.00 


2 


40.00 


2.00 


2.00 


44.00 


2 


50.00 


2.00 


2.00 


54.00 


3 


60.00 


2.00 


3.00 


65.00 


3 


75.00 


2.00 


3.00 


80.00 


4 


80.00 


2.00 


4.00 


86.00 


4 


100.00 


2.00 


4.00 


106.00 


5 


100.00 


2.00 


5.00 


107.00 


5 


125.00 


2.00 


5.00 


132.00 


6 


120.00 


2.00 


6.00 


128.00 


6 


150.00 


2.00 


6.00 


158.00 


7 


140.00 


2.00 


7.00 


149.00 


7 


175.00 


2.00 


7.00 


184.00 


8 


160.00 


2.00 


8.00 


170.00 


8 


200.00 


2.00 


8.00 


210.00 


9 


180.00 


2.00 


9.00 


191.00 


9 


225.00 


2.00 


9.00 


236.00 


10 


200.00 


2.00 


10.00 


212.00 












11 


220.00 


2.00 


10.00 


232.00 












12 


240.00 


2.00 


10.00 


252.00 













FULL-TIME GRADUATE STUDENTS registering for 12 semester hours or more: 

S220.00 SIO.OO $230.00 

Registration Procedures 27 



3. PARKING (VEHICLE REGISTRATION) 

Students who park a motor vehicle on campus are required to purchase and 
display a current decal. Decals purchased during the Fall and Spring will incur 
a $10.00 fee. These decals will be valid throughout the 1970-1971 academic 
year (Fall, 1970, Spring, 1971, and Summer 1971). Second decals may be 
purchased for $1.00 at the Parking Office. 

4. Present a photo copy of your Social Security card. PLEASE NOTE THAT 
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS WILL BE USED TO REPLACE THE 
CURRENT SYSTEM OF STUDENT NUMBERS. Only if this was not prev- 
iously submitted. 

5. Complete and submit yellow "Personal Information Form." (New students 
only) 

6. Verification for registration (New students only) 

a. Graduate students (new students only) must enclose a transcript indicating 
receipt of a bachelor's degree. 

b. Evening Undergraduates (new students only) must enclose the "permission 
to begin course work" or letter of pre-matriculation. 

TO COMPLETE REGISTRATION BY MAIL 

1 . Advisement and Departmental Signatures 

a. Students who are presently matriculated in an M.A. program, or in a certifica- 
tion program, or in an undergraduate Evening Division program (i.e. those 
who have a work program prescribed by the college) DO NOT have to meet 
with their advisor for a signature, providing they are not deviating from 
their work program or, unless so directed. 

b. All students not in prescribed programs at Montclair State College who de- 
sire to register by mail must meet with the departmental advisor, and secure 
his signature (as required by the college) prior to registering by mail. Ad- 
visors will be available in departmental offices according to the following 
dates and times: 

Fall Semester — August 3-6, 1 : 30-2 : 30 p.m. 

Spring Semester — December 14-17, 6: 15-7: 15 p.m. 

If courses are taken in more than one department, a signature is required 
from an advisor in each department. 

2. Schedule for Mailing Registration 

Students must remit their Registration Form Receipt Voucher, Social Security 
Form, the appropriate verification as listed under 6(a), (b) above. Vehicle Regis- 
tration Form (if needed) and check or money order according to the priority 
below. Students may mail after the initial priority but not before. 

28 Mail Registration i 



Status Code (Box 7) Fall Semester 

XI, 03, and 04 July 27-30 

01, 02, 06, 07, X7, 08, 09, 10 August 3-21 

3. Mailing 



Spring Semester 
November 30-Decembcr 3 
December 14-20 



Registration will be processed on a priority basis. 

All registrations which are incorrect, incomplete or postmarked after 
August 21, 1970 for the Fall Semester and December 20, 1970 for the 
Spring Semester will be returned and students will be required to register 
in person according to the prescribed priority schedule on pages 30 and 31. 



Make Check Payable To : 
Montclair State College 



Mail Registrations To: 

Evening Division Office 
Montclair State College 
Upper Montclair, New Jersey 07043 
ATTN: REGF 



CLASS ADMISSION CARD(S), LIBRARY-IDENTIFICATION LABEL 
AND RECEIPT WILL BE MAILED TO THE STUDENT 

TO COMPLETE REGISTRATION IN PERSON 

Students who have not taken advantage of the mail registration and wish to 
register must come in person according to the priority schedule on the following 
pages. Students who have received registration materials in the mail should 
bring them when registering in person. Details for registration will be posted in 
College Hall. Students must bring records of previous college work in order to 
establish priority for registration. In addition, matriculated students must present 
their Work Program to advisors. Students registering as first time certification or 
special students must present a transcript of their undergraduate or graduate studies. 
Previously registered certification students must have their Work Program or a 
letter from Trenton. 



Mail Registration 29 



TIME AND PRIORITY SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER — 1970 





Status 


Date & Time 


Code: 


onday, Sept. 14 


03 


5:00-6:30 p.m. 


04 


5:00-6:30 p.m. 


01, XI 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



Tuesday, Sept. 1 5 
5:00-9:00 p.m. 



01 



02 



10 



X7 
07 
08 
09 



Classification 

Matriculated MSC graduate students, and 
Matriculated MSC Evening Division Under- 
graduate students. 

Certification students previously registered at 
MSC, (does not include MSC undergraduates), 
working toward their first certificate to teach. 
This does not include those working on advanced 
certificates or endorsements on their original 
certificate. (Work program or letter from Tren- 
ton required.) 

Certification students, registering for the first 
time at MSC, working toward their first certifi- 
cate to teach in New Jersey. All students must 
attend a registration meeting which will be held 
promptly at 6:30 p.m. in the College Hall 
C-304. Registration procedures follow this meet- 
ing. 

Pre-matriculated Graduate Students. (Students 
who have filed an application and have received 
a letter indicating they are "pre-matriculated. 
This letter should be presented at registration in 
order to establish priority. 

Non-matriculated M.S.C. Evening Division 
Undergraduates who have made application and 
received permission to begin course work. 

Special students (non-matriculated students, 
working beyond B.A. or M.A., matriculated 
M.A. candidates at other institutions, auditors, 
endorsements on original certificates, out-of-state 
certification, and advanced certification, such as 
guidance, secondary school principal, etc.) Stu- 
dents must bring transcript of undergraduate or 
graduate work or evidence of a college degree. 



Students unable to take advantage of the above priority arrangement may 
register with other groups provided they arrive after their priority schedule. 
Students MAY NOT register ahead of their priority listing. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

September 16, 17, 18— 3:00-5:00 p.m.— Room C-121 
September 19—9:00-12:00 noon— Room C-121 

Students registering on September 16, 17, 18 or 19 will be charged a $5.00 late 
registration fee. 

NO REGISTRATIONS ACCEPTED AFTER SEPTEMBER 19 



30 In Person Registration 



TIME AND PRIORITY SCHEDULE 

SPRING SEMESTER— 1971 



Date & Time 

Monday, Jan. 25 
5:00-6:30 p.m. 



5:00-6:30 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



6:30-9:00 p.m. 



Tuesday, Jan. 26 
5:00-9:00 p.m. 



Status 
Code: 

03 
04 

01, XI 



01 



02 



10 



X7 
07 
08 
09 



Classification 

Matriculated MSC graduate students, and 
Matriculated MSC Evening Division Under- 
graduate students. 

Certification students previously registered at 
MSC, (does not include MSC undergraduates;, 
working toward their first certificate to teach. 
This does not include those working on advanced 
certificates or endorsements on their original cer- 
tificate. (Work program or letter from Trenton 
required.) 

Certification students, registering for the first 
time at MSC, working toward their first certifi- 
cate to teach in New Jersey. All students must 
attend a registration meeting which will be held 
promptly at 6:30 p.m. in the College Hall 
C-304. Registration procedures follow this meet- 
ing. 

Pre-matriculated Graduate Students. (Students 
who have filed an application and have received 
a letter indicating they are "pre-matriculated. 
This letter should be presented at registration in 
order to establish priority. 

Non-matriculated M.S.C. Evening Division 
Undergraduates who have made application and 
received permission to begin course work. 

Special students (non-matriculated students, 
working beyond B.A. or M.A., matriculated 
M.A. candidates at other institutions, auditors, 
endorsements on original certificates, out-of-state 
certification, and advanced certification, such as 
guidance, secondary school principal, etc.; Stu- 
dents must bring transcript of undergraduate or 
graduate work or evidence of a college degree. 



Students unable to take advantage of the above priority arrangement may 
register with other groups provided they arive after their priority schedule. 
Students MAY NOT register ahead of their priority listing. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

January 27, 28, 29—3:00-5:00 p.m.— Room C-121 
January 30—9:00-12:00 noon— Room C-121 

Students registering on January 27, 28, 29 and January 30, will be charged a $5.00 
late registration fee. 

NO REGISTRATION ACCEPTED AFTER JANUARY 30. 

In Person Registration 31 



TUITION, FEES AND EXPENSES* 

All checks should be made out to: Montclair State College 

TUITION 

New Jersey Residents and Teachers, and Non-residents 
Undergraduate (those students who do not hold a bachelor's degree) 

Per semester hour of credit $20.00 

Graduate (those students who hold at least a bachelor's degree) 

Per semester hour of credit $25.00 

Full Time Graduate Students ( 12 s.h or more) $220.00 

(includes registration fee) 

REGISTRATION FEE 

To be paid each time a student registers — non-refundable 2.00 

STUDENT UNION BUILDING FEE 

To be paid each time a student registers — non-refundable. 

$1.00 per s.h. to a maximum of $10.00 

A raise in the Student Union Building Fee is anticipated for Fall 1971. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

An additional fee charged to all students who fail to register during 1 

the regular registration period 5.00 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FEE 

$10.00 to be paid when student files an application for admission to a pro- 
gram. This fee must accompany the application form and is not refundable. 

CHANGE OF CLASS SCHEDULE FEE 

A $5.00 fee charged to students who, after their initial registration each 
semester, desire to make any changes in their original class schedule other than a 
withdrawal from a class. 

TRANSCRIPT FEE 

$1.00 for single copy. Inquire in the Evening Division Office. 

REFUNDING OF FEES 

In accordance with a decision of the State Board of Education on May 3, 1962, 
the following uniform schedule of refunds was effective in all New Jersey State 
Colleges on September 1, 1962: 

?er Cent 
Periods of Withdrawal Refunded 

Withdrawal before course begins 100% 

Withdrawal during first third of course 60% 

thru October 21 (Fall Semester) 
thru March 6 (Spring Semester) 

• Subjea to change any time by aaion of the State Board of Higher EUucatlon. 
32 Fees 



Withdrawal between first third and first half of course 30% 

thru November 14 (Fall Semester) 

thru March 27 (Spring Semester) 
Withdrawal during last half of course None 

The percentage of refund is based upon the total obligation. 

A reduction in a student's program is equivalent to a withdrawal. This policy 
applies to such reductions. Tuition and service charges are refunded in full if 
classes are discontinued by the authorities at the college. 

IN COMPUTING REFUNDS, THE DATE OF WITHDRAWAL IS THE DATE 
ON WHICH THE EVENING DIVISION OFFICE RECEIVES A WRITTEN NOTICE 
FROM THE STUDENT. 



1^ ^-i^ ' ^.. 




Fees 33 



COURSES OF THE EVENING DIVISION 

FALL 1970 and SPRING 1971 

The courses listed below will be offered through the Evening Division during 
the Fall, 1970 and Spring, 1971. Courses numbered 500 or above are open only 
to graduate students; those numbered 400-499, inclusive, are senior-graduate 
courses; and those below 400 carry undergraduate credit only. 

* Some 400 courses listed with this mark ( * ) indicate that they may not be used 
for graduate credit. 

THE DAILY SCHEDULE BEGINS ON PAGE 95. 

All students should be careful not to enroll in courses which they have 
previously taken. The final responsibility for duplication of courses rests with the 
student. 

The College reserves the right to cancel any course or to make changes. 

CODES FOR BUILDINGS 



Life Hall A 

Annex II B 

College Hall C 

Annex IV E 

Finley Hall F 

Partridge Hall G 

College High School H 

Annex; I I 



Speech K 

Fine Arts L 

Music Building M 

Panzer Gymnasium P 

Recreation Building R 

Sprague Library S 

Mallory Hall V 



ARRANGEMENT AND NUMBERING OF DEPARTMENTS 



Code 

10 

11 

15 
20 

21 
24 
26 
28 

29 

30 
40 
40 
41 
46-49 
50 
60 



Department Page 

Business Education 36 

Distributive Education ... 37 

Education 39 

English 50 

Speech and Theater 52 

Fine Arts 53 

Home Economics 55 

Industrial Education 

and Technology 56 

Vocational-Technical 

Education 58 

Library Science 59 

Classics 59 

Linguistics 60 

French 60 

Spanish-Italian Languages . 61 

Mathematics 63 

Music 66 



Code Department Page 

63 Philosophy and Religion . . 68 

65 Psychology 69 

73 Health Education 73 

76 Physical Education 74 

80 Science 75 

81 Biology 76 

82 Chemistry 77 

83-84 Physics/Earth Science ... 78 

90 Social Science 78 

91 Anthropology 79 

92 Economics 80i 

93 Geography 80 

94 History 81 

95 Political Science 83 

96 Sociology 84| 

97 Speech Pathology 85i 

99 Field Studies 



34 Department and Building Codes 



EVENING DIVISION UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 



Fall, 1970 

lOiAIOl Business Organization & 

Management 
10:A201 Accounting I 
10:A405 Business Economics 
10:A434 Introduction to Data Processing 
11:A208 Salemanship 
20:A105 Composition and Literature I 
20: A 106 Composition and Literature II 
20:A252 Contemporary Drama: 

Anderson to the Present 
20:A262 Modern European Novel 
20:A341 Art of Poetry 
20:A362 American Fiction to 1900 
21 :A100 Fundamentals of Speech 
21 :A106 Oral Interpretation of Literature 
24:A100 Introduction to Visual Arts 
24 : A4 1 Masterpieces of World Art 
41 :A100A Beginning French I 
41 :A200A Intermediate French I 
41 :A200B Intermediate French II 
46:A100A Beginning Spanish I 
46:A101 Selected Readings: 

19th and 20th Centuries 
46 :A200A Intermediate Spanish I 
49:A100A Beginning Italian I 
49:A200A Intermediate Italian I 
50:A101 Introduction to Modern 

Mathematics 
50: A 105 Elements of Statistical Reasoning 
60:A100 Introduaion to Music 
63:A203 Ethics 
65:A100 General Psychology 
65:A201 Child Psychology 
73:A100 Healthful Living 
81:A100 Introduction to Biological Science 
83:A100 Introduction to Physical Science 
84:A100 Fundamentals of Earth Science 
84:A120 Descriptive Astronomy 

93 :A302 Economic Geography 
94: A 103 The Development of 

Early Western Civilization 

94 :A108 The Development of African Civ. 
94:A110 The Development of 

American Civ. 
94: All! Selected Topics in 

American History to 1876 
94:A211 The U.S. since World War I 
94 : A322 History of the Middle Ages 
94:A435 Emergence of Modern America, 

1820-76 
95:A200 Introduction to Political Science 
96 : Al 1 1 Race and Ethnic Relations 



Spring, 1971 

10:A202 Accounting II 

10:A421 Investments 

10:A435 Unit Record Equipment 1 

11 :A4l4 Merchandising Mathematics 

1 1 :A417 Marketing 

1 1 :A418 Retail Store Management 

20:A105 Composition and Literature I 

20: A 106 Composition and Literature li 

20:A354 Shakespeare's Major Plays 

20:A418 English Language: History, 

Grammar and Linguistics I 
20:A432 Medieval Literature 
20:A44l Modern Poetry: 

French Symbolists to T. S. Eliot 
21 :A100 Fundamentals of Speech 
21 :A204 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
24:A100 Introduction to the Visual Arts 
24:A413 Art of the 20th Century 
41:A100B Beginning French II 
4l:A200B Intermediate French II 
46 :A100B Beginning Spanish II 
46 :A103 Spanish Grammar and 

Composition 
46 :A200B Intermediate Spanish II 
49:A100B Beginning Italian II 
49:A200B Intermediate Italian II 
50:A103 Development of Mathematics 
50:A104 Mathematics of Personal Finance 
60:A426 Survey of Music Literature 
63 :A270 History of Religion 
65: A 100 General Psychology 
65 :A200 Educational Psychology 
80:A418 Three Centuries of Science 

Progress 
82:A100 Introductory Chemistry 
84:A101 Principles of Geology 
91 :A200 Cultural Anthropology 
92:A200 Introduction to Economics 
93:A200 Cultural Geography 
94:A112 Selected Topics in American 

History since 1876 
94 : A 1 1 8 Development of Classical 

Civilization 
94:A122 Nineteen Century Europe, 

1815-1914 
94:A123 Contemporary Europe: 

1914 to the Present 
94: A3 17 Black History 
94:A421 Renaissance and Reformation 
94:A436 America in Transition, 1865-1917 
96:A112 Sociology of Leisure 



Undergraduate Courses 35 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS STUDIES 



Business Education 



10:A101 Business Organization and 
Management 

This course is an introduction to the world 
of business. It goes into the functions of 
business, bank services, credit, insurance, 
forms of business organization, location 
and layout, purchasing and stock control, 
production problems, finance, and person- 
nel problems. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



10 :A405 Business Economics 

This course deals primarily with the busi- 
ness aspects of economics as related to the 
free enterprise system, money, credit and 
banking, gross national product, and de- 
vices measuring economic progress. The 
Federal Reserve System, business fluctua- 
tions and business cycles, taxation and 
government finance arc also included as 
specific areas of course coverage. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 



10:A201 Accounting I 

This is a basic course in accounting. Em- 
phasis is placed on development of a 
thorough understanding and mastery of 
the fundamental elements of bookkeeping 
and accounting. After analyzing the ele- 
mentary accounting equations, the student 
learns to journalize, post, take a trial 
balance and prepare financial statements, as 
applied to the sole proprietorship form of 
organization. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



10:A202 Accounting II 

This course starts with a thorough review 
of the accounting cycle. The student learns 
to use special journals, controlling ac- 
counts, work sheets, classified statements, 
reserves, accruals, deferred items, reversals, 
special columns and business papers. Spe- 
cial attention is given to the use of voucher 
system, payroll accounting and accounting 
for taxes. 

Prerequisite: 10:201. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



10:A401 Principles and Methods of 
Teaching General Business 

Consideration is given to the methodology 
of teaching the general business subjects, 
including general business, business law, 
and consumer education. Content, lesson 
planning, visual aids, and evaluation pro- 
cedures are considered for each subject. 
Prerequisites: 10:101, 305, 308. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

36 Business Studies 



10:A409X Consumer Economics 

Consideration is given to the role of the 
consumer in the economy, some of the 
forces affecting consumer demand, govern- 
mental and private agencies aiding the 
consumer, and development of intelligent 
techniques for buying and using consumer 
goods and services. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



10:A421 Investments 

This is a general course in investments, 
trusts, and estates. It concerns itself with 
types of securities, diversification, sources 
of information, operation of the stock 
market, and analysis of financial state- 
ments. Also covered are trusts, wills, and 
estate planning. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



10:A434 Introduction to Business Data 
Processing 

This course familiarizes the student with 
the literature and vocabulary of business 
data processing — input and output media, 
types of equipment, installations, job anal- 
ysis and systems development. 
Prerequisite: 10:201. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



10:A435 Unit Record Equipment I 

This course covers the concepts and opera- 
tional techniques of punch card data pro- 
cessing machines, control panel wiring, j 
card punch, accounting machines, verifiers 






and sorters. Four hours, lab plus two lec- 
tures. 

Prerequisite: 10:434. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



10:A470 Business Education for 

Teachers of the Disadvantaged 

This course is designed to prepare teachers 
of business subjects to meet the specific 
needs of disadvantaged students. Emphasis 
is given to the occupational opportunities 
open to the disadvantaged and the sec- 
ondary school business program which will 
prepare them for these occupations. Teach- 
ers will build curricula and develop special 
instructional materials and methods needed 
for disadvantaged students in the inner- 
city schools. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



10:A501 



Principles and Problems of 
Business Education 



Survey of basic principles and practices of 
business education. Topics include history 
of business education, objectives, relation- 
ship of business education to general edu- 
cation, trends and problems in the field. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



10:A502 Evaluation of Current 
Literature in Business 
Education 

Introduces the literature of business edu- 
cation to the graduate student from a 
research point of view. Current literature 
from all sources — articles, research papers, 



books — are evaluated using selected criteria 

for such evaluation. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A512 Improvement of Instruction 
in General Business Subjects 

Study of objectives, content, methods, 
teaching aids, and evaluation procedures 
for courses such as general business, eco- 
nomic geopraphy, business law, and con- 
sumer education. 

Prerequisites: Undergraduate methods 
course in general business and teaching 
experience. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



1():A514 Improvement of Instruction 
in Typewriting and Clerical 
Practice 

Em^phasis is placed on refinement of teach- 
ing and personal skills in typewriting and 
business machine operation. Latest recom- 
mended teaching techniques are examined, 
demonstrated, and exaluated. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate methods 
course in typewriting and teaching ex- 
perience. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



10:A603 



Research Seminar in 
Business Education 



Includes study and anaylsis of significant 
research studies in business education, in- 
vestigation of procedures in education re- 
search, and techniques of thesis writing. 
Prerequisite: 15: 503, 10: 501 and 10: 
502 or equivalents. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



Distributive Education 



11:A208 Salesmanship 

This course covers the selection of pros- 
pects, the approach determining needs, sales 
presentation, overcoming objections of the 
[customer, closing the sale and "plus" sell- 
ing. Assigned sales presentations arc in- 
Icorporated in the applications of the 
[selling techniques learned. (Part-time 
[work experience is recommended when 
taking Salesmanship.) 
\3 semester hours Fall Semester 



1 1 :A4l4 Merchandising Mathematics 

This course analyzes the problems of how, 
what, where, and when to buy; terms of 
purchasing, tested receiving and marketing 
procedures; mathematics and merchandising 
— setting retail price, planning mark-up 
and mark-down; and inventory controls. 
(Part-time work experience is recom- 
mended when taking Merchandising.) 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



Business Studies 37 



11:A417 Marketing 

This is a study of the principles underlying 
the distribution and services from the man- 
ufacturer to the consumer. Marketing poli- 
cies and practices are covered as well as the 
evolution and change of marketing proce- 
dures and recent governmental activities 
affecting marketing. A managerial approach 
to the subject is given. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

1 1 : A4 18 Retail Store Management 

This course acquaints students with the 
problems involved in the successful opera- 
tion of a retail organization, preparation of 
the store for business, the movement of 
merchandise from the resource to the store, 
the preparation of the goods for sale, the 
movement of the goods to the selling floor 
and then to the customer. Customer adjust- 
ment policies, store protection and the latest 
kinds of equipment used by retail stores 
are alsa discussed and evaluated. (Part- 
time work experience recommended when 
taking Retail Store Management.) 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

11:A422 Visual Merchandising 

A study is made of the basic principles and 
elements of color, line, form, texture and 
space as they relate to displays, merchan- 
dising and advertising. Topics include ap- 
propriate display space, lighting arrange- 
ments, improvision of display equipment, 
the use of papier mache forms, seasonal 



displays, equipment and care of display 
fixtures. Four hours, lab plus two lectures. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

1 1 : A52 1 Development of a Distributive 
Education Curriculum 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint 
graduate students with the developments of 
curriculum in distributive education for 
one and two year cooperative and project 
methods classes as well as the building of 
curriculum for introduction to Distribu- 
tive Education and special adult and dis- 
advantaged groups. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

11:A551 Improvement of Instruction in 
Distributive Education 

This course gives the experienced distribu- 
tive education teacher an opportunity to 
study the content, method, teaching aids, 
and evaluate procedures in instruction in 
the distributive education program. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

1 1 :A553 Trends in Retail 
Distribution 

A comprehensive introduction to and eval- 
uation of the field of retailing. The trends 
that indicate the future structure and func- 
tioning of the retail field, including con- 
sumer and marketing developments, arc 
considered. Current periodic literature is 
examined and outside speakers are used to 
supplement classroom lectures. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



i8 Business Studies 



DIVISION OF EDUCATION 



15:A404 and A405 Supervised 
Teaching Seminar 

This seminar is provided for in-service 
teachers employed on an emergency or pro- 
visional certificate and is open to students 
participating in the "approved" certifica- 
tion program or the Master of Arts in 
Teaching program. Arrangements are made 
with the employing Superintendent of 
Schools for joint supervision of the in- 
service teacher by local school and College 
officials. The student will assume full 
teaching responsibilities and will meet 
periodically at the College for a complete 
academic year. 

In this seminar students have an opportun- 
ity to examine their teaching materials and 
techniques and to share their experiences 
with other beginning teachers. Cooperating 
local school personnel and supervising in- 
structors assist the new teachers with their 
on-the-job problems. 

4 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A408 Selection and Utilization of 
Audio-Visual Materials 

Sources, selection, and evaluation of audio- 
visual aids are studied in this course. 
Techniques in developing individual refer- 
ence catalogs of audio-visual aids and the 
production of school-made aids are stressed. 
The use of the latest audio-visual equip- 
ment is demonstrated. 

5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A420 Instructional Innovations 

This course will acquaint the student with 
the rapidly developing innovative practices 
in teaching. It will be organized on a team 
teaching basis to consider new ways of or- 
ganizing students, staff, curriculum, time 
and space, as well as to investigate such 
techniques as independent study, group dy- 
namics, programmed instruction and stu- 
dent evaluation. 
5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A423 Teaching in the Urban Schools 

This course acquaints the student with the 
socio-economic setting of the inner-city 



schools and studies the inner-city school 
system through its students, administrators, 
teachers and special personnel (guidance, 
medical staff, remedial work specialists) . 
Other areas examined will be the specific 
problems brought to the school by the in- 
ner-city student which reflect his mores and 
family patterns, the recent theories, prac- 
tices and programs for changes in teaching 
in urban schools, the recent innovations in 
funding and their impact on urban educa- 
tion, the ideas for reorganization of the 
schools and the school systems, the ex- 
ploration of techniques employed to re- 
orient experienced urban teachers to develop 
more effective teaching methods. Visits to 
urban schools and agencies are arranged to 
provide background experience and under- 
standing. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A424 Teacher, School and Society 

This course is intended as an introduction 
to the field of education. It is an overview 
of selected areas in which the teacher, as 
a professional educator, should acquire 
knowledge and understanding such as the 
school as a social and legal system, the 
nature and function of the teacher within 
these systems, and the student: his ex- 
pectations and impact upon the system. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A436 



Curriculum and Methods in 
Sex Education 



This is a course in which students will 
develop curriculums to fit into their indi- 
vidual schools. Methods for implementing 
these curriculums will be demonstrated, and 
current texts and audio-visual materials 
will be analyzed. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A451 



Guidance for the Classroom 
Teacher 



This course is designed as an introduction 
to the field of guidance for teachers who are 
concerned with problems of guidance and 
human relations in the classroom. Although 
the course emphasizes the role of the teacher 

Education 39 



in guidance, it is also designed to give the 
teacher a picture of the place of guidance 
in the modern school, to indicate the tech- 
niques utilized in a good guidance pro- 
gram, and to identify some of the tools of 
the guidance counselor. (As this course 
cannot be used for credit towards the 
Master's degree in Student Personnel Serv- 
ices, graduate students who plan to go 
into the Student Personnel Program should 
not elect this course.) 
5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15 : A461 The Junior High School 
Curriculum 

Recent trends in the development of the 
junior high school curriculum and the 
relation of the curriculum to the aims, 
function, and organization of the junior 
high school are covered. Curriculum pat- 
terns in representative junior high schools 
are studied and evaluated. An opportunity 
is given to each student to develop units 
of work for junior high school subjects 
in the major of his choice. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A501 



Tests and Measurements 
in Education 



An introduction to the principles and 
practices of educational tests and measure- 
ments. Course topics include: historical and 
philosophical orientation; basic statistical 
concepts; test validity and reliability; 
principles of test construction; evaluation 
of tests; grading and reporting; analysis 
of various standardized intelligence, ability, 
and personality tests; and experimental 
educational tests. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



1 5 : A503 Methods of Research 

An Introduction to the theory and method 
of historical, descriptive and experimental 
research. Course topics Include: formula- 
tion of a research problem, use of bio- 
graphical sources and reference materials, 
PERT, types and Instruments of research, 
data collection and analysis, writing the 
research report, and career opportunities In 
research. 

Prerequisite: 15:501 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15 :A504 Action Research for Teachers 

This course is designed to provide teachers 
with an understanding of the basic prin- 
ciples and techniques of research which are 
applicable to their classroom situations. 
Examples of various kinds of classroom 
research, both of an individual and group 
nature, are studied and analyzed. Practice 
is provided in the planning and outlining 
of specific research projects, the develop- 
ment of experimental designs, and the 
evaluation of the structure and outcomes 
of classroom research. Each student de- 
velops, in detail a plan for a research 
project which he might be Interested in 
undertaking In his own classroom. Open to 
M.A.T. and certification students only. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15 :A505 The Two- Year Junior College 

This course is designed to acquaint the 
students with the history, purposes, pat- 
terns, and trends of the two-year college, 
Including the junior college, the community 
college, and university extension centers. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A507 Measurement and Evaluation I 

A theory and practice course designed to 
develop comprehension of and skill in 
constructing tests in the cognitive domain, 
such as Intelligence, achievement, and apti- 
tude tests. Laboratory exercises are in- 
cluded. 

Prerequisite: A basic course In statistics. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A508 Measurement and Evaluation II I 

A theory and practice course designed to 

develop comprehension of and skill in 

constructing tests in the affective domain, 

such as interest tests, attitude scales, and 

self concept tests. Laboratory exercises are 

Included. 

Prerequisite: 15:507 or equivalent. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester i 



15 :A509 Medical Problems in Education i 

In this course the role of the educator is 
studied In relation to the following subject 



40 Education 



areas: childhood, chronic and contagious 

diseases; nutritional problems; narcotics; 

and psycho-socio-medical pathologies. The 

impact of health problems on the family, 

school, and community is emphasized 

throughout. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A510 Educational Administration I 

This basic course in educational leadership 
examines the nature and dynamics of or- 
ganizations from the viewpoints of the 
social and behavioral sciences. Leadership, 
decision-making, conflict resolution, and 
other theories are considered in the educa- 
tional setting. Students view the impact of 
environmental and personal forces on or- 
ganizational behavior. 

Prerequisites: One and one-half years suc- 
cessful teaching under certification. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



1 5 : A5 1 1 School Business Administration 

This is a basic course concerning the role 
of school business administration in the 
public school. The various functions and 
structures of school business operations and 
the techniques employed in their opera- 
tion are surveyed. Various simulation tech- 
niques are utilized to construct both a 
traditional and PPBS budget document. 
Prerequisites: School Law and Educational 
Administration I 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A514 School Law 

After an introductory general study of such 
topics as legal theory, practical politics, the 
relationship of school district organization 
to other units of government, the appellate 
function of the State Commissioner of Ed- 
ucation and the State Board of Education. 
the course is concerned principally with the 
study of New Jersey school laws (Title 
18A of the Revised Statutes) and the 
Rules and Regulations of the State Board 
of Education and their decisions. The New 
Jersey school legal structure is compared 
to that of other states. 

Prerequisite: 15:510 Educational Admin- 
istration I 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



I 

1 



15:A5l6 School Finance 

After an introductory unit concerned with 
the current economic environment, this 
course is devoted to a study of state, local 
and federal taxation, state school aid theory 
and practice, school district indebtedness, 
statutory school budget and fiscal controls, 
and various cost-quality instruments. The 
role of school fiscal structure in relation to 
local, state and federal governments also 
is studied. 

Prerequisite: Educational Administration I 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A517 Systems Analysis in Education 

This is a course which utilizes the latest 
techniques in operations research for educa- 
tional purposes. Systems analysis techniques 
are studied and utilized by the student in 
an instructional, curricula, or administra- 
tive mode. Simulation techniques are 
widely used in classroom-oriented activi- 
ties. 

Prerequisite: A course in curriculum and/ 
or school administration. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



1 5 : A 520 Secondary School 
Administration 

This course considers the special adminis- 
tration problems of the junior and senior 
high school. Such topics as recruitment of 
staff, scheduling of teachers and students; 
department organization and school morale 
are studied. Recent experiments in organi- 
zation structure are reviewed. Supervision 
of instruction is emphasized as a major 
function of administration. The current 
demands of the adults in the community 
and the students and how these relate to 
the role of the school in the guidance of 
youth is placed as a concern of administra- 
tion. How the secondary school operates 
in relation to the elementary school and 
higher education is studied to help design 
education as a continuous process. Students 
write a paper on a special administrative 
problem. 

Prerequisites: 15:510 Introduction to Ed- 
ucational Administration 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

Education 41 



15 :A525 School Plant Planning 

This is a basic course in school plant plan- 
ning which treats the relationships be- 
tween educational facilities and educational 
programs. Such topics as school site selec- 
tion, the development of educational 
specifications, the school's physical environ- 
ment, the selection of equipment, and the 
programming of various facilities based on 
curricula and community needs are included 
in the course. Group visits to examplary 
educational facilities are an integral part 
of the instructional process. 
Formerly: 15:525 School Building Plan- 
ning. 

Prerequisite: A course in the principles and 
methods of curriculum design and in edu- 
cational administration. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A530 



Curriculum Construction 
in the Secondary School 



The purpose of this course is to consider 
the extent to which the secondary school 
curriculum meets the needs of a changing 
civilization, and to consider effective means 
of curriculum construction. 
Prerequisite: One and one half years suc- 
cessful teaching experience under certifica- 
tion. 
5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A531 Middle School Curriculum 
and Organization 

The emerging curriculum of the rapidly de- 
veloping middle school is explored. Atten- 
tion is given to the organization of pupils, 
instruction, media, and facilities. The in- 
fluences of recent social changes and edu- 
cational innovations are emphasized. Stu- 
dents have oportunities to study practices 
in typical middle schools and to develop 
instructional strategies. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

15:A532 Principles of Curriculum 
Development 

The study of the curriculum as conceived 
by professionals and the impact of the 
supporting society on curriculum will be 
the major purpose of the course. The cri- 
teria for selecting content and its sequential 
development in relation to individual dif- 
ferences as they relate to the societal values 

42 Education 



in a dynamic society will be examined. 
Stress will be placed on the role of leader- 
ship in guiding needed curriculum changes 
wisely. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A533 Educational Thought to 
the 20th Century 

An examination of philosophic assump- 
tions and beliefs behind various educational 
theories which have been proposed through 
the centuries, from Classical to Modern 
schools of thought. The development of 
Realism, Idealism, Experimentalism, Schol- 
asticism, and other schools will be discussed 
through the consideration of such great 
thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, 
Locke, Descartes, Rousseau. Marx, Nietz- 
sche and others. 

Formerly: 15:533 Philosophy of Educa- 
tion 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A535 



The Teaching of 
Communication Skil 



The role of communication skills is of 
major importance in the learning process. 
Every teacher should be aware of the 
abilities, limitations, and needs of students 
in this area, the adaptations that must be 
made in curricula, assignments, and class- 
room procedures to the levels of the stu- 
dents in a classroom, and the remedial 
measures that might be taken to improve 
their status. These communication skills 
include specific areas of speaking, listening, 
reading and writing. Instructors from the 
departments of Speech, Reading, and Eng- 
lish are involved in this course. The en- 
deavor is made to have the students gain 
an understanding of the basic principles in 
each of these fields and their relationship 
to the teaching of any subject. 
Open to M.A.T. and certification students 
only. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A540 Supervision I 

This course covers the supervisory role of 
such school personnel as principals, co- 
ordinators, and department and subject | 
area supervisors both in the elementary and 
secondary schools. It examines the theoreti- 
cal human relations problems met with by 



those designated as supervisors. In as much 
as this role has undergone many changes 
within the last twenty years in its con- 
tribution to improving instruction and in 
supporting the professional work of class- 
room teachers, the importances of this 
change is emphasized. 

The student becomes acquainted with the 
current journals and other research that 
gives a broad view of the supervisor as a 
professional. It conceives the school as a 
community of professionals with the lead- 
ers playing a helpful and coordinating role. 
Prerequisite: At least two years of teaching 
or equivalent educational experience. 
Formerly : 15:540 Supervision of Instruc- 
tion. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A54l Supervision in Special Fields 

This course directs the student to the 
special problems of supervision in a parti- 
cular subject area at the secondary school 
level, or to the problems of general super- 
vision at the secondary or elementary 
school level. Where special supervision 
activities relating to age groups, materials 
of instruction, or professional growth and 
evaluation are unique for the subject area, 
specialists in these fields will be used as in- 
structors. 

Prerequisite: one and one half years suc- 
cessful teaching experience under certifica- 
tion. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

15:A545 Social Forces and Education 

The course is an examination of the vari- 
ous facets of society which have a distinct 
impact on the educational system. It in- 
cludes an analysis of economic, political, 
social, ethnic and religious forces as they 
relate to problems of our educational 
system. Field studies will be part of the 
course. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A547 Existentialism in Education 

An intensive study of the existential motifs 
in Sartre, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heideg- 
ger, Buber and Camus with emphasis on 
the implications for educational aims, cur- 
riculum, methods, and values. The works 
of contemporary educators such as Morris, 



Kncller, Greene, and others who have be- 
gun to define the meaning of Hxistentialism 
for education will also be explored. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



I5:AS48 (Contemporary Educational 
Thought 

Critical evaluations of specific schools of 
philosophy which have contributed to ed- 
ucational thought in the 20th Century 
such as Pragmatism, Progressivism, Exis- 
tentialism, Perennialism, Reconstructionism 
and others. An analysis of current trends 
and problems as well as the pricinciples 
underlying educational theory and practice 
will be included. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

15:A549 Comparative Studies of 
Educational Systems 

The course is an examination of educa- 
tional institutions and systems in various 
areas of the world with particular attention 
given to the following problems: the re- 
lationship between social structure and 
types of educational institutions: the con- 
flict between traditional and modern edu- 
cation: the nature of the profession on the 
secondary and college levels: student move- 
ments for educational change. Major em- 
phasis is given to aspects of education in 
England. France, Ghana, Italy, Israel. 
Sweden. Japan, and Germany. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A550 Literature for Adolescents 

Concerned with the interests, attitudes, and 
reading abilities of contemporary youth, 
this course is designed to provide content 
area teachers with a background for the 
development of recreational reading pro- 
grams in junior and senior high schools. 
Appraisal of literature written for students, 
as well as literature originally intended for 
adults but read widely by adolescents, is 
of major concern in the course. Related 
topics include: criteria for book selection, 
censorship, role of mass media, minority 
group identification through books, biblio- 
therapy, bibliography, and the importance 
of the librarian. 

15:550 not open to those who have taken 
20:547. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

Education 43 



15:A55lN Administration and 
Supervision of 
Reading Programs 

This course is designed to acquaint the 
student with the more complex aspects of 
organizing and administering reading pro- 
grams. It includes such topics as: theory 
and techniques of leadership, program de- 
velopment, organization of in-service pro- 
grams, developing a budget, methods of 
evaluation, etc. In general, this course is 
aimed at providing essential background 
for reading specialists to establish or ad- 
minister a functional secondary school 
reading program. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15 :A552 The Nature of Reading 

The literacy of a nation is an international 
as well as a domestic concern. Teachers 
need an awareness of the conventions and 
controversies which surround the teaching 
of reading. This course provides the sec- 
ondary subject area teacher and the be- 
ginning reading specialist with a knowledge 
of the foundations of reading. Topics in- 
clude: the nature of reading, readiness, be- 
ginning reading, developmental skills, cur- 
rent practices in teaching of reading in the 
elementary schools, and a reappraisal of the 
place of reading in a changing society. 
Not open to those who have taken 
15:556. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A553 Techniques of Reading 

Improvement in the Secondary 
School 

This is a practical course dealing with 
popular techniques useful in the improve- 
ment of non-clinical reading difficulties 
found in the content subjects. Planned es- 
pecially for the subject area teacher and the 
beginning reading specialist, a study is 
made of secondary school reading needs, 
and specific suggestions are outlined for 
guiding the slow, average, and gifted stu- 
dent to success in reading up to his capacity 
in a classroom situation. Through an 
actual study of the more widely used read- 
ing workbooks, films, slides, tachitoscopic 
instruments, and texts available in the 
Reading Laboratory facilities, a practical 
approach is made to building repertoire of 



reading skills in many areas. 

(Not open to those how have taken Educ. 

430 and 557.) 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

15 :A554 Case Studies of Reading 
Diflficulties, Part I 

This is a basic course in learning the tech- 
niques that may be used to diagnose read- 
ing difficulties. After making a thorough 
study of the most frequently used tests and 
inventories, each teacher applies this knowl- 
edge to the actual testing of a child with 
reading problems. Particular attention is 
given to the unique values of group and 
individual tests, survey and diagnostic tests, 
and standardized and informal tests. Prac- 
tice in case reporting to parents, schools 
and agencies is undertaken. The course is 
geared to develop skills in diagnosing 
reading problems for individuals which 
will be used by the clinician for treating 
remedial and corrective students. 
Prerequisite: Previous experience in read- 
ing courses. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

15 :A555 Case Studies of Reading 
Diflficulties: Part II 

Part II of Case Studies of Reading Diffi- 
culties is directed toward refinement of the 
case study and the role of individual and 
classroom diagnosis in the reading pro- 
gram. Discussion will be geared to this role 
of diagnosis in terms of the reading spe- 
cialist as part of a team in developing pro- 
grams for improving the teaching of 
reading through diagnosis, the case study, 
local and national norms, and other rele- 
vant data. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

15:A556 and A557 Corrective and 

Remedial Reading: 
Part I and II 

The clinical courses in causation and treat- 
ment of reading disability are planned for 
advanced students and specialists who arc 
involved in some aspect of remedial in- 
struction. Part I offers an oportunity to 
extend training by investigation and inter- 
pretation of serious reading problems. A 
study is made of the constellation of causes 
of treatment are projected. In Part II par- 
ticular attention is paid to the selection 



44 Education 



and adaptation of suitable improvement 
devices and materials and ideas which may 
enable a disabled reader to improve his 
reading. Intensive treatment in a practicum 
situation is required. Clients are drawn 
from the classes in the Reading Labora- 
tory. Additional tutoring hours will be 
arranged. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A558 Field Experience in Reading 

The aim of the course is to introduce the 
student to various aspects of reading 
through agencies and programs actually 
dealing with such problems. Students ob- 
serve and participate in activities of the 
agencies to which they are assigned and 
write full accounts of these observations 
and experiences. Also students engaged in 
long-range research, students who have 
limited teaching experience, and students 
who need additional field and clinical ex- 
perience may enroll and pursue their ideas 
with the approval of their advisor. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor to 
the M.A. program in Reading. 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15 :A564 Dynamics of Group Process 

A laboratory-based course for all those 
who wish to develop group skills and 
understandings. Focus is on experiential 
learning and personal growth. Readings in 
human interaction theory will be related 
to actual group participation. The func- 
tion of groups within large organizations 
will also be studied. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A565 Consultation in Organizational 
Development 

A laboratory-based course which focuses on 
the role of the organizational consultant. 
The emphasis is on planning, providing 
help, and evaluating activities. Students 
will develop diagnostic and behavioral 
skills which aid individuals and groups 
within organizations to become more ef- 
fective. This course is designed for those 
considering consultation work in business, 
industry, government, penology, education, 
community organizations and the like. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A566 Television Production 
Seminar 

A combination lecture, laboratory, seminar 
course in which students gain various ex- 
periences in television studio production: 
television camera operation, basic principles 
of lighting, sound for television, elements 
of television set design, functions of floor 
director, control room operations and basic 
television directing. 

Formerly: 15:407A Television in Educa- 
tion Workshop: Programming and Pro- 
duction. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

15:A567 Television Programming 
Seminar 

A combination lecture, laboratory, seminar 
experience in which students gain various 
experiences in the programming of ideas 
for television, the creative concept, pre- 
planning, executing the visual idea and 
evaluating the visual presentation. Local 
and commercial television programs are 
examined. 

Formerly: 15:407B Television in Educa- 
tion Workshop: Classroom Utilization. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

1 5 : A568 and A569 Production of 
Audio-Visual 
Instructional 
Materials, Part I 
and II 
These two courses combine laboratory and 
seminar experiences in the organization 
and preparation of instructional materials 
for classroom use. They are intended for 
teachers, administrators, and audio-visual 
materials for instructional purposes. Stu- 
dents have opportunities to prepare pic- 
tures, slides, transparencies, displays, 
models, graphs, magnetic tapes and motion 
picture segments, according to their inter- 
ests and needs. 

15:A568 Production of 

Audio-Visual Instructional 
Materials: Part I, 
Non-Projected Materials 

Part I deals with non-projected materials, 
such as drawings, charts and graphs, bul- 
letin boards, feltboards, maps, demonstra- 
tions, exhibits and displays, dioramas, 
3 -dimensional models, etc. 
Formerly: 15:573. 
Prerequisite: 1 5 :408. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Education 45 



1 5 : A569 Production of 

Audio-Visual Instructional 
Materials : Part II, Projected 
and Audio Materials 

Part II includes production of projected 
and audio materials, such as slides, film- 
strips, opaques, transparencies, magnetic 
tapes, motion pictures, etc. 
Formerly: 15:5 74. 
Prerequisite: 15:408. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A570 Counseling Adults 

This course is established to study the tech- 
niques that are appropriate to the counsel- 
ing of adults. Special attention will be 
given to the identification of problem areas 
common to students of college age, to 
parents, and now school adults. Much of 
the class time will be devoted to case 
studies with ample opportunity for the 
student to engage in supervised practice. 
Prerequisite: 15:580 Principles of Guid- 
ance and Counseling. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A571 Environmental Education 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize 
the students with the history philosophy 
and development of outdoor-conservation- 
environmental education. The objectives 
and procedures for implementing environ- 
mental programs are analyzed. Communi- 
ties offering successful programs will be 
identified and model program materials 
will be studied. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A572 Conservation Education 

This course is designed to give teachers 
and prospective teachers a background for 
organizing and teaching conservation on 
various grade levels. The need for con- 
servation, the various kinds of natural re- 
sources, and some of the modern methods 
for using and renewing these sources are 
considered. Field trips, laboratory experi- 
ences, visual aids, printed materials, and 
visiting specialists combine to make this 
a useful introductory course for all teach- 
ers. Formerly: 15:441 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A573 



Curriculum for Environmental 
Education 



Techniques and procedures for the de- 
velopment of curriculum guides and ma- 
terials for teaching environmental education 
and conservation are the goals for the 
course. Emphasis will be placed upon each 
student's developing materials which may 
be put into use in his local school pro- 
gram. The course will deal with the se- 
lection, production and utilization of 
audio-visual materials related to outdoor 
education. Techniques of producing and 
constructing teaching aids will be demon- 
strated. Educational materials available 
from education and commercial sources 
will be demonstrated. Educational ma- 
terials available from education and com- 
mercial sources will be surveyed. 
Formerly: 15:455 Developing Curriculum 
Guides and Materials for Environmental 
Education Programs. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



1 5 : A577 Social Case Work 

This course reviews principles in social 
case work as they relate to the school set- 
ting. Study is devoted to the theoretical 
development of social work norms, and to 
the function and role of the school social 
worker (visiting teacher) . Cases which 
have been developed by Social Workers 
will be studied and experiences in a school 
will be provided. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15 :A578 Testing and Evaluation in 
Student Personnel Services 

This course deals with fundamentals of 
educational and psychological measure- 
ments in guidance: test theory, statistical 
concepts, test construction, evaluation and 
interpretation. The place of tests in the 
instructional program is stressed. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 



15:A580 Principles of Guidance and 
Counseling 

Topics included in this course cover: 
philosophy of guidance, history of the 
guidance movement, the need for guidance 
presented by children and adolescents. The 



46 Education 



methods of gathering useful data are 
studied, and school records, exploratory 
activities, tests, inventories, the case study 
approach, occupational information, and 
occupational data are treated as well as 
general methods of guidance with special 
stress on interviewing and counseling of 
studentb. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



1 5 : A 582 Vocational Guidance and 
Occupational Information 

This course is intended for counselors in 
the junior and senior high schools to ob- 
tain information about the principles and 
philosophy of vocational education and 
the techniques of counseling youths who 
wish to receive pre-employment training, 
and for counselors of out-of-school groups 
who are attempting to make readjustments 
to occupational life. Attention is also given 
to guidance techniques for job preparation 
and readjustment, the matching of educa- 
tional and personal abilities to job specifi- 
cations, the effects of social legislation on 
the employment of youths, and a study 
of techniques used in determining occupa- 
tional needs and occupational changes. 

Prerequisite: 15:580. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A583 Educational Guidance 

This course is concerned with the facilities 
available for education after high-school 
graduation, the problem of further train- 
ing for pupils leaving school before com- 
pleting high school, and the academic 
problems of students while in school. A 
brief survey of colleges and college admis- 
Ision procedures is made. 

Prerequisite: 15:580. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



|15:A585 Group Guidance and 
Counseling Activities 

|This course is concerned with the various 

|tcchniques for helping 3 individual pupils 

ind for using group activities including 

role-playing as a guidance technique. The 

froup activities considered include those 



of home rooms, activity periods, occupa- 
tion courses, student field trips, placement 
follow-ups, college nights, and career days. 

Prerequisite: 15:5 80 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A586 Elementary School Guidance 
Services 

This course is designed for guidance coun- 
selors in the public schools with particular 
emphasis on the guidance services that may 
be offered in grades kindergarten through 
six. TTie guidance program, as established 
in the public schools, envisions supervision 
and administration of the guidance pro- 
gram from the kindergarten through grad- 
uation at grade twelve. It is important, 
therefore, that the guidance director under- 
stands the services that can be made avail- 
able to the elementary school. 

Prerequisite: 15:580 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A587 Administration and Supervision 
of Guidance Programs 

This course is designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent with more complex aspects of the 
supervision and administration of a guid- 
ance program. It includes such topics as: 
developing and administering programs of 
student registration (course selection) : 
theory and techniques of scheduling a 
modern high school; supervisory respon- 
sibilities of the director of guidance etc. In 
general, this course is aimed at providing 
essential background for counselors desir- 
ing to establish or administer a guidance 
program in a high school or a multi-school 
system. Within and outside of the depart- 
ment; coordinating guidance activities in a 
multi-school district. 

Ths primary method of study is the ex- 
amination and evaluation of current guid- 
ance practices leading to the formation of 
proposals for improvement, and possible 
inclusion, in guidance programs where the 
student is working as a counselor and/or 
director. 

Prerequisite: 15:580 and 6 s.h. in the 
Guidance Program of the Student Person- 
nel Services M.A. Degree program. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



Education 47 



15:A589 Student Personnel Services 
in Higher Education 

This course is a study of the student per- 
sonnel functions in two-year and four- 
year colleges. The areas to be included are: 
personal counseling, financial aid, dormi- 
tory management, health program, student 
activities and social programs; course se- 
lection, job placement, college administra- 
tion and academic retention, administra- 
tion and supervision of the program. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



5:A603 



Principles and Practices of 
Research 



The purpose of this course is to give stu- 
dents an opportunity to collect, analyze, 
and interpret data; to state the findings; 
to draw conclusions and generalizations; to 
write a research report together with an 
abstract; and to give an oral report. 

This is an elective course in educational re- 
search. It may be substituted for a depart- 
mental research seminar upon the approval 
of both the departmental advisor and the 
chairman of the Education Department. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A591 Education in Latin America 

The course begins with an analysis of the 
basic social and economic structure of Latin 
America. The following topics concerning 
Puerto Rico are considered: characteristics 
of urban and rural life; processes of indus- 
trialization; problems of fusion with as- 
pects of American culture; patterns of 
family life. These social aspects are related 
to problems of education during the last 
generation. Mexico's social structure, in 
particular the role of the Indian, is con- 
sidsred in relation to establishing a new 
educational system on the elementary, sec- 
ondary and college levels. Brazil's educa- 
tional structure is studied, especially the 
major features of the teaching profession 
and differences in education in rural and 
urban areas. Cuba's educational system 
since the 1959 revolution is analyzed as a 
reflection of the desire to alter the fabric of 
society. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



15:A60lE Workshop in Education : 
Psychology-Sex Education 

A workshop-lecture course in which 
eminent psychologists, health educators, 
religious leaders, sociologists, biologists, 
physicians and media specialists will lecture 
and participate in group discussions. 
Topics emphasized will be: sex education 
in the home, marriage and family relations, 
genetics, birth control, sex and religion, 
developmental psychology and the sex role, 
sex and the self-concept. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 
48 Education 



15 :A604 Field Work and Practicum 
in Guidance and Counseling 

TTie aim of the course is to introduce the 
student to various aspects of guidance 
through experience in agencies actually 
dealing with such problems. Students ob- 
serve and participate in activities of the 
agencies to which they are assigned and 
write full accounts of these observations 
and experiences. Some time is spent in dis- 
cussing and evaluating these experiences 
and relating them to the literature of the 
subject. 

Prerequisite: 15:580 and 10 s.h. work in 
the Student Personnel Services program. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



5:A607 



Field Work and Practicum 
in Social Work 



The student will be provided with an op- 
portunity to participate in school social 
work in an actual school situation. 
Diagnostic skills, interviewing techniques, 
case recording, individual and group 
therapy and the team approach will be ob- 
served and discussed. Under the guidance 
of a certified, experienced school social 
worker, the student will develop an under- 
standing of the use of community re- 
sources. The student will be given an op- 
portunity to observe special services 
(school social worker, psychologist, psy- 
chiatrist, speech or reading specialist, and 
teacher) in action as together a therapeutic 
plan is developed for the school pupil. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters \ 






15:A610 



The Student Personnel 
Services Team 



This is a core course designed to establish 
the philosophy, membership, roles, and 
functions of the various services that com- 
pose the Student Personnel Services Team. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

15:A6l9 Seminar in Administration: 
Supervision and Curriculum 

This seminar provides an opportunity for 
the student to initiate and complete an 
original research project in the fields of 
Administration and/or Curriculum devel- 
opment. This course is open to students 
matriculated for a Master's degree in Ad- 
ministration and Supervision and to others 
upon permission of the instructor. This 
seminar should be taken after a student has 
completed at least 24 semester hours in his 
work program. 

Prerequisite: 15:503 or its equivalent. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

15:A628 Field Experiences in 

Administration and Supervision 

Students are assigned to a particular junior 
or senior high school, where under the 
guidance of a school administrator or su- 
pervisor they carry out certain functions of 
these positions. A college staff member acts 
las coordinator and supervisor of this activ- 
ity by visiting the school and consulting 
with the student, observing him, in action 
land plans with the school personnel for 
[improvement and evaluation of the stu- 
dent's work. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A65() Research Seminar and 
Thesis Writing 

During the time that the student is pre- 
paring the research document he shall en- 
roll in 15:650, Thesis Supervision. This 
shall entitle him to faculty advisement and 
conferences. If the student does not com- 
plete the document during the semester in 
which he has enrolled for 15:6 50 he shall 
be required to re-enroll in 15:650, but 
for no credit, each semester until the docu- 
ment is completed. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A659 Research Seminar in 
Reading 

The course is designed to provide a labora- 
tory situation for the exploration and 
study of problems in the field of reading 
that have been suggested by the educational 
events and trends of the year, by the inter- 
ests and responsibilities of the members of 
the class, and by educational movements in 
New Jersey, the country and the world. 
Each student will execute an individual 
research effort which he reports to the 
class. 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



15:A678 Techniques of Evaluation 

This is a core course designed to assure 
adequate background in the design, use, 
and interpretation of statistical evidence. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



Education 49 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



20:A105 Composition and Literature I 

Reading selected literary works from differ- 
ent periods and cultures to provide basis 
for principles and methods of expository 
writing; a substantial number of writing 
assignments required to provide practice in 
both composition and literary analysis. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



20: A 106 Composition and Literature II 

Skills developed in 20:105 utilized in 
criticizing representative selections of litera- 
ture typifying the major cultural epochs of 
the Western world; in addition to frequent 
writing assignments, a research paper deal- 
ing with some aspect of the literature re- 
quired. 
5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



20:A252 



Contemporary Drama : 
Anderson to the Present 



Key plays studied to emphasize new trends 
and developments; both esthetic and socio- 
logical values stressed. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

20 : A262 Modern European Novel 

Continental novels from 1850 to the pre- 
sent; critical attention directed toward 
political, social and literary values in selec- 
ted novels. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



20:A34l Art of Poetry 

Critical consideration of problems of de- 
fining and evaluating poetry; representative 
selections, illustrative of critical points es- 
tablished, discussed; characteristics of dif- 
ferent types of poetry; representative major 
poets in historical perspective. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



20:A354 Shakespeare's Major Plays 

Representative plays studied in terms of 
dramatic art, sources, staging in the Eliza- 
bethan theater and in the modern critical 
approaches. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



20:A362 American Fiction to 1900 

At least ten works of fiction to become 
familiar with major critical opinions deal- 
ing with these works; art of the novel to 
receive attention, especially in relation to 
Henry James. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A418 The English Language — 
History and Grammar — 
Linguistics I 

Development of English from its Indo- 
European origins up to and including the 
advent of the eighteenth century grammari- 
ans who formed the foundations for what 
is called "Traditional" grammar; emphasis 
on the Germanic strains and the morphol- 
ogy of Old and Middle English; followed 
by a review of modified traditional Ameri- 
can grammar as it is still presented in some 
schools. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A432 Medieval Literature 

English Medieval literature from the Old 

English period to the close of the Fifteenth 

Century, with emphasis on the works of 

Chaucer. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A44l Modern Poetry : French 
Symbolists to T. S. Eliot 

Representative Symbolist, Georgian and 
Imagist poets studied; and examination of 
theories and principles as basis of modern 
poetry. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A454 Film and Society 

Film studied as art form, social force, edu- 
cational device, entertainment medium; his- 
tory of motion pictures, films techniques, 
scenario as literary type; numerous films 
shown as illustrative. 

3 semester hours Spring Semestet 

20:A471 Teaching English in the 
Secondary School 

Methods of handling problems in listening 
speaking, reading, and writing to secure* 
best responses from junior and senior high 
school students; textbooks and all tools olj 



50 English 



learning examined and evaluated; unit and 
daily lesson plans analyzed and made. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20: A 500 Greek Classical Drama 

All extant plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripides, and Aristophanes; mythologi- 
cal sources, dramatic structure, and the 
philosophy of each author. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20 : A 5 1 2 The English Language 

The nature and origin of language; the 
ancestry of English; its early growth; 
sources of the vocabulary and word build- 
ing; semantic change; the coming of dic- 
tionaries. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A513 The Renaissance in Europe 

Baccaccio. Machiavelli, Cellini, Castiglionc, 



Robelais 

discussed. 

3 semester hours 



Cervantes and others will be 
Spring Semester 



lioti" 



20:A515 Modern American Criticism 

American critical writers since 1920 arc 
discussed: T.S. Eliot, Allan Tate, Howard 
Mumford Jones, John Crowe Ransom, 
David Daiches, Mark Schorer, Northrop 
Frye and others. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A519A Myth: Origin and 
Development 

Selected world mythologies synthesized 
against the theories of Frazer. Harrison, 
Freud, Campbell, Cassirer, Neumann, Jung 
and others: emphasis on myth as represen- 
tative of the origin of all human knowl- 
edge and disciplines, and especially on 
myth and ritual in its relationship to the 
development and understanding of the 
literature arts and the creative process. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A519B Myth: Theory and Practice 
in Literature 

Critical analysis of several literary works 
to determine how myth functions in liter- 
ary works of art; also to understand the 
to determine how myth functions in liter- 
experience; works of the major archetypal 
critics; independent study of a single myth 
'reappearing in literature through the ages. 



rte 



or of the selected works of a mythopoetic 
author, or of a particular archetype ap- 
pearing in a variety of works. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



20:A524 



Contemporary British 
Literature 



From 1945 to the present; trends and 
philosophies: C.P. Snow, Brendan Behan, 
John Osborne, K. Markandays, Joyce 
Cary, Iris Murdoch and others. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A526A Theory of the Novel 

Systematic treatment of the origins, devel- 
opment, and craft of the novel; from 
Henry James to the present. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A53lB Seventeenth Century Prose 

Bacon, Burton, Walton, Hobbes, Bunyan, 

Pepys, and Dryden. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A535A Defoe, Pope, Swift 

Early neo-dassicism in prose and poetry; 
critical evaluation, especially the current 
renewed interest in this early part of the 
eighteenth century. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A543 Contemporary American 
Literature 

Major authors in prose, poetry, and drama; 
movements and trends of contemporary 
writing; Bellow, Miller, Williams, Lowell, 
Albee, Mailer, Baldwin and others. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A546 Seminar in American Writers: 
Faulkner 

A comprehensive study will be made of 

one giant of American literature. Emphasis 

will be placed, not only on the significance 

of his individual works, but also on his 

influence on American thought and literary 

patterns. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A603 English Research Writing 

An exercise in original research using the 

routines and techniques of the English 

field. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

English 51 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND THEATER 



21 :A100 Fundamentals of Speech 

Effective voice production and clear, pleas- 
ing diction are developed through speech 
activities. The work is adapted to indivi- 
dual needs as related by recordings and 
diagnostic tests. The work may include 
prescribed additional practice in the speech 
laboratory. Failure to achieve an acceptable 
standard of performance results in the 
withholding of credit until the student 
demonstrates satisfactory achievement. 
5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

2 1 :Al06 Oral Interpretation of 
Literature 

This course is organized to increase the 
student's appreciation of literature. The 
emphasis is on individual classroom per- 
formances followed by informal critiques 
and the development of a repertory. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

21 :A204 Fundamentals of Public 
Speaking 

The student studies techniques for pre- 
paring and delivering effective, informative, 
persuasive, and entertaining speeches. He is 
given special opportunities to address the 
class to enter into formal critiques and to 
moderate one program. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

21:A440 Theater History: Classical to 
Elizabethan 

This course is designed to offer the student 
a comprehensive view of the development 
of the theater from the classical Greek 
through the Elizabethan period. Special 
attention is placed upon plays and play- 
wrights of the period, theater architecture, 
scenery, costuming, styles of acting and 
presentation of each period. Course work 
includes oral reports, lectures, and class- 
room demonstrations. 



2 semester hours 



Fall Semester 



2 1 : A47 1 Advanced Acting 

Through three areas of activity this course 
aims to broaden the student's appreciation 
of the art of acting and to increase his own 
acting skill. Individual study of established 
actors and schools of acting, through cri- 
tiques of current acting as observed by 

52 Speech and Theater 



21:A567X 



Seminar in Dramatic 
Production 



attending professional productions, and 
preparation of solo and group acting exer- 
cises. Prerequisite: 21:107 or the equiva- 
lent with a grade of "B" or better or per- 
mission of instructor. Limited enrollment. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

2 1 : A490 Group Discussion and 
Leadership 

The purpose of the course is to study the 
principles of democratic discussion and 
methods employed in guiding and parti- 
cipating in the informal group discussion, 
and in the panel, symposium, lecture, and 
debate forum. Techniques and uses of par- 
liamentary procedure are also considered. 
Application of the principles and methods 
studied is given through student participa- 
tion in the various types of discussion pro- 
gram dealing with ways in which group 
discussion may be used as an effective teach- 
ing method in the general school curricu- |[j 
lum. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

21 :A566 Costume and Make-up for 
the Stage 

This course provides the advanced student 
with opportunities to design costumes and 
make-up for plays of various periods. 
Consideration is given to the use of mate- 
rials, colors, and textures in achieving 
disired effects on the stage. Laboratory 
work is provided to develop skill in creat- 
ing a wide variety of make-ups. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



This seminar is for advanced play-pro- 
duction students. It allows each member of 
the class to pursue projects in keeping with 
his needs or interests in both the technical 
and directorial aspects of play production. 
When possible, supervisory assignments are 
made in connection with the current pro- 
gram of plays. The seminar meets a mini- 
mum of four hours daily for individual 
project or laboratory activities, for evalua- 
tion of specific teaching problems in con- 
nection with the current plays, and for 
group analysis of typical production h^ 
problems. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 






DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 



24: A 100 Introduction to the Visual Arts 

The ways in which man has expressed 
himself in the many forms of the visual 
arts including painting, ceramics, sculpture, 
weaving, print making, architecture, the 
theatre, motion pictures and photography 
are explored through studio work, demon- 
strations by artists and craftsmen, reading, 
discussion and trips to art sources. Empha- 
sis is placed upon the development of an 
understanding of the nature of art and the 
experience of art, their significance to the 
individual, and their role in a culture. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



24:A302 



Foundations of Methods 
in Art Education 



The content of this course includes a study 
of research findings of the pattern of child 
development in plastic and graphic media; 
the organization and presentation of art 
experience to the children of grades one 
through twelve; the relationship of art to 
other areas of the curriculum; and the 
role of the arts in the extra-curricular pro- 
gram within the school and the com- 
munity. Practical aspects of teaching art 
including materials and tools and their 
sources, cost, care, and organization are 
studied. Required of fine arts majors. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



24:A406A,B,C,D 



Photography A 
Contemporary Art 
Form I and II 



The content is predominantly creative, us- 
ing the technical materials as a medium or 
expression and experimentation. The work 
of leading contemporary artists using pho- 
tography as an art medium is studied. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

l24:A408 Multi-Media 

'his course will present an opportunity to 
mng together previous fine arts experience 

[in painting, sculpture and various aspects 
)f theatre arts. 

'he projects will be architectural and en- 
nronmental in nature and will serve to in- 
troduce the student to both historical and 

|:ontemporary ideas of total-art. 

semester hours Fall Semester 



24 : A4 10 Masterpieces of World Art 

Designed for non-art majors, this intro- 
ductory course studies key works of art 
representing prehistoric cultures, the ancient 
world, the East, the Renaissance, and the 
modern period, in reference to their histori- 
cal and cultural settings and the personality 
of the artist. The course employs illustrated 
lectures, museum and gallery trips, read- 
ings and discussion. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

24:A4l3 Art of the Twentieth Century 

This course surveys the major influences 
and trends in the development of painting, 
sculpture, and architecture of the Twen- 
tieth Century. Activities include illustrated 
lectures, discussions, readings, reports, and 
visits to museums and galleries. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A419A,B,C,D Life Drawing I and II 

A study of the structure and proportions 
of the human form with emphasis on 
expressiveness of drawing. 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24 : A423 Teaching of Art History 
to Grades K- 12 

Both workshops and theoretical discussions 
will be developed in this scientifically ac- 
curate survey of the life of ancient cul- 
tures. The art historical approach will be 
directed toward direct perception and dis- 
cernment of the language of color, form 
and matter. All activities will lead toward 
developing the aesthetic awareness of the 
child. The emphasis will be, to see history 
through the prism of the interests and 
needs of children and to present it in a 
creative and imaginative matter. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24 :A502 Curriculum Construction 
in Art Education 

This course is planned for students with 
interest in curriculum construction or re- 
vision and includes both the elementary 
and secondary programs. A study of cur- 
ricular materials in use in New Jersey and 
selected materials in use throughout the 
country will be made. Evaluation of these 
materials will be made in terms of prin- 
ciples of curriculum construction. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



Fine Arts 53 



24:A51lA, B, C, D Painting 

Studio in painting is designed to further 
the creative impression and technical 
knowledge of the student in various paint- 
ing media. Emphasis will be upon the 
personal and professional development 
through studio work, trips, and the study 
of the contemporary artists. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



24 : A52 1 A, B, C, D Sculpture 

In these courses the student is expected to 
explore independently one or two materials 
and techniques and to begin to find his 
own directions as a sculptor. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



24 : A525A and B Metalwork and 
Jewelry I and II 

Experiences in this sequence involve the 
designing of jewelry and small sculpture 
in varied metals and employing the tech- 
niques of flat sheet metal and casting. 
2 semester hours each Fall Semester 



24:A531A, B, C, D Ceramics: Pottery 
and Sculpture 

This course is designed for continued 
experimentation with the potter's wheel, 
various handbuilding methods of forming 
and further experimentation with clay 
compositions, glazes and methods of firing. 
Advanced students will be held responsible 
for developing a consumate craftsman ship 
and a personal idiom. 
Prerequisite: Undergraduate experience in 
ceramics, portfolio or instructor's approval. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



24:A550A,B,C,D Silk Screen Printing 

This course affords an opportunity to 
study and practice the graphic art tech- 
niques of silk screen from the creation 
of the master design through the construc- 
tion of necessary printing facilities and 
printing. Experiences will include the use 
of tusche, glue, stencil lacquer, and photo- 
graphic techniques. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

54 Fine Arts 



24:A551 Intaglio Printing 

This course is designed to enable the gradu- 
ate student to acquire additional compe- 
tency and depth of experience in etching, 
dry point, aquatint, and soft ground. Stress 
is on critical evaluation of design inte- 
grated with printing techniques. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



24 : A590 Modern Philosophies of Art 

The work of the major writers in art 
in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries 
is examined. Exploration is made in the 
nature of the creative experience, the func- 
tion of art in the life of the individual 
and of society, the nature of the creative 
process the rise of new materials, and 
institutions and sentiments affecting cur- 
rent thinking in the field. Discussions are 
based on readings of philosophers, poets, 
social scientists, psychologists, and artists. 
For fine arts majors only. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

24 : A 591 Selected Problems in Art 
History 

This is a seminar course dealing with 
selected art problems of historic, social and 
philosophic nature. Some of the following 
topics are chosen for a detailed examina- 
tion: the human figure in the history of 
art; the rise of landscape painting; Im- 
pressionism in the East and West; histori- 
cal views of art criticism; the self-portrait; 
Romanticism and Realism; art and society; 
the art market; the relation of the sciences 
and the rise of the "Isms." Methods of 
dealing with selected topics include lec- 
tures, readings, reports and discussions. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester, 

24 : A603 Seminar in Art 

This course is designed primarily to af- 
ford the graduate student an opportunity 
to make an extensive study in the fielc 
of art. Prerequisite: 15:503. 
The seminar extends through the Fall anc 
Spring semesters. Within this period, eacl 
student will carry out either A or B 
A. WRITTEN PROJECT. The studen 
will enroll, with the approval of th 
graduate advisor, in this course. Approva 
should be secured in the spring or summe 
before fall enrollment. 



B. CREATIVE PROJECT. 

Prerequisite: at least one course in the 
chosen studio area, during which course the 
student must secure: 1. approval of the 
instructor as to competence in the medium; 
2. agreement by one particular faculty 



member to serve as personal advisor 
throughout the creative project; and 3. 
approval of the departmental graduate 
advisor. Upon such approval, the student 
will enroll for the subsequent fall semester 
in the course 24 ;603. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 



26:A420 



Teaching Family Living in 
the Public Schools 



Study and selection of subject matter and 
techniques for teaching family living in 
elementary and secondary schools. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



26:A424 Workshop in Home 

Economics-Teaching Sex 
Education in the Home 
Economics Program 

Designed to increase sensitivity and under- 
standing of the issues involved in teaching 
I sex education with opportunities to ex- 
j amine useful approaches, through a Home 
Economics program. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



26:427 The Inner City Family 



This course is a study of families with 
various kinds of disadvantages: social, eco- 
nomic, educational, physical and cultural. 
Of primary importance, however, are fami- 
lies from lower socio-economic and 
minority groups. Cause and effect factors, 
community agencies and curriculum devel- 
opment arc some of the areas of study 
leading to understanding children from 
these backgrounds and orienting subject 
imatter to their needs. Provision for indi- 
Ividual field experiences will be part of the 

;.::l:ourse. 

i'' ii^ormerly 26:427 The Disadvantaged 
Ipamily. 

:i"' J semester hours Fall Semester 



. 01 

oi 



6:A5lO Interdisciplinary Study of the 
Family 



To familiarize students with contribu- 

50ir.: tons which various academic disciplines 

history, anthropology, biology, econom- 

:s, as well as psychology and sociology) 



make towards a more comprehensive un- 
derstanding of family life. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



26:A511 Contemporary Issues in 
Home Economics 

A seminar dealing with timely issues in 
home economics with special emphasis on 
changes in society which affect the family. 
Attention is centered on problems of con- 
tinuing concern. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

26:A540 Child in the Family 

An intensive study of the theories and 
research related to child rearing technique 
including a critical analysis of factors in- 
fluencing parental practices and their ef- 
fects on the child. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

26: A 560 Clothing and Human 
Behavior 

An intensive study related to analysis of 
factors affecting appearance and satisfac- 
tion in clothing. The economic, socio- 
logical, and psychological aspects of cloth- 
ing are studied in relation to the individual. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



26:A603 



Advanced Studies in Home 
Economics 



Library or experimental research on specific 
problems of limited scope. Work may be 
taken in the following areas: (a) child 
and family; (b) family and consumption 
economics; (c) family housing; (d) 
foods; (e) nutrition; and (f) textiles 
and clothing. 
Prerequisite: 15:503. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Home Economics 55 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
AND TECHNOLOGY 

Industrial Arts 



28:A250 Foundations of Industry — 
Plastics 

A fundamental study of the plastics in- 
dustry and machine operations in the 
manipulation of a variety of plastic ma- 
terials. Emphasis is given to fundamental 
principles and concepts, machine process- 
ing, as well as material selection, equip- 
ment use and safety. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



28:A260 Foundations of Industry 
— Metals 

An introductory study of concepts and pro- 
cesses involving metallic materials supple- 
mented by related laboratory experiences. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



28:A270 Foundations of Industry 
— Electronics 

The basic fundamentals of electricity are 
studied. Course work is proportioned 
between theory, laboratory experience, and 
special project work. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



28 : A280 Foundations of Industry 
— Power 

An introduction to power sources with 
emphasis placed upon the study of recipro- 
cating internal combustion engines. The 
course will provide an overview of the de- 
sign, development, function and operation 
of common power sources. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



28:A332 Screen Process Reproduction 

Screen Process Reproduction provides a 
background in both screen process printing 
and elementary line photography. Topics 
covered are hand cut films, photographic 
films, and photographic processes. 
Prerequisite: 28:130 or permission of 
instructor. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



28:A344 Cabinet Construction 

In the general field of cabinetmaking, 
built-in, kitchen and fine furniture cabinet 
construction are studied. Emphasis is placed 
on the use of industrial construction pro- 
cedures in fabricating cabinets. 
Prerequisite: 28:140 or permission of 
instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A351 Plastics Molding and 
Forming I 

An intermediate laboratory course con- 
cerned with the manipulative processes 
of injection molding, compression molding, 
transfer molding and rotational molding. 
Stress Is placed on process procedure, cycle 
preparation and adjustment, material se- 
lection and use, machine setup and func- 
tion, sequential operation, mold use and 
understanding, maintenance of equipment 
and safety. 

Prerequisite: 28:250 or permission of the 
instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A36l Industrial Metals 

An Intermediate metalworking course in- 
volving additional study of the industrial 
processes relative to the metals industry: 
metallurgy, measurement and layout, 
benchwork, machining, sheet metal, spin- 
ning, foundry, and heat treatment. 
Prerequisite: 28:260 or permission of 
Instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A402 Curriculum and Teaching of 
Industrial Education 

Emphasis will be placed upon professional! 
preparation for student teaching. Areas of I 
study will Include planning a course ofj 
study, demonstrations of technical materials] 
and equipment, safety In the laboratory 
maintenance of equipment, requisltioningj 
and distribution of supplies, use of in- 
structional materials and evalutlonal tech- 
niques. 
3 semester hours Fall Semeste,] 



mil] 
Ntroc 



56 Industrial Education and Technology 



28:A404 A,B,C Independent Studies in 
Industry 

Independent Studies in Industry is designed 
to encourage students to pursue individual 
study problems under the guidance of a 
sponsoring faculty member. The study to 
be performed will be based on a problem 
jointly agreed upon by the student and the 
faculty sponsor. 

Prerequisite: Application through the de- 
partment office prior to registration. 
1-3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

28:A424 Engineering Graphics 

The fundamentals of descriptive geometry 
are explored in conjunction with ortho- 
graphic projection as a system of identify- 
ing three-dimensional space data for the 
graphical solution of applied engineering 
problems. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A434 Offset Lithography 

A presentation of the industrial processes, 
techniques, and skills necessary to produce 
reproductions by the photo-offset litho- 
graphic process. Topics covered arc copy 
preparation, camera techniques, line and 
halftone photography, densitometry, strip- 
ping, platemaking and presswork. 
Prerequisite: 28:130 or permission of 
instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28 : A443 Wood Technology 

A study of the origins, development and 
advances made in the field of woods. Em- 
phasis is placed on the nature of wood, the 
physical characteristics and properties of 
wood. Stress is given to a study of the 
manufacturing processes, industrialization 
and mechanization that has taken place in 
the wood industry, including occupational 
groups. 

Prerequisite: 28:140 or permission of the 
instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A496 Jewelry Making and Lapidary 

Laboratory experience includes the design 
of pieces that will involve casting and 
wrought jewelry processes. Lapidary expe- 



riences cultivate skills in sawing, shaping, 
polishing and mounting stones to exhibit 
their inherent qualities. 
5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

28:A5()1 Curriculum Construction and 
Course Organization in 
Industrial Education 

Curriculum construction techniques used 
in developing a program of industrial arts 
are studied. Special emphasis is placed 
on the development of industrial arts 
courses and instructional materials. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A5()3 Historical and Contemporary 
Industrial Arts Literature 

Published material related to industrial arts 
is surveyed to determine its applicability to 
laboratory teaching and professional im- 
provement. This includes historical writ- 
ings on the development of industry and 
industrial education, research literature in 
the field, published materials provided by 
corporations and government agencies, and 
pertinent reference works, handbooks, and 
periodicals. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28 : A507 Principles and Philosophy of 

Vocational-Technical Education 

The coordinators of cooperative industrial 
education programs are provided with the 
opportunity to study the principles and 
philosophy of vocational-technical educa- 
tion. The course content presents a brief 
history of the cultural, social, govern- 
mental, economic and technical forces 
which affect the devolpment of vocational- 
technical education. The organization and 
function of the state divisions of voca- 
tional education are presented. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A508 Problems in Organizing 

and Teaching Cooperative 
Industrial Education Programs 

The coordinator is acquainted with the 
various practices for coordinating high 
school programs with the needs for local 
industry. Empasis will be placed on the 
supervising responsibilities within the 
school, and the cooperation required with 
public and private agencies. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



Industrial Education and Technology 57 



28:A601 Independent Study in Industrial 
Arts 

This course is designed to allow students to 
pursue study on individual problems under 
the guidance of a sponsoring faculty mem- 
ber. In addition, credit may be obtained 
for I. A. 601 upon completion of an ap- 
proved industrial course related to the stu- 
dent's special area of interest. 
Prerequisite: Application through Depart- 
ment office prior to registration. 
1-3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



28:A603 



Research Seminar in Industrial 
Arts 



Two patterns of research are considered in 
this seminar: 1) Industrial research tech- 
niques with materials and processes as they 
may be adapted to industrial arts programs 
in public school; 2) Education research 
techniques as they are applied to problems 
in industrial arts education. (This course 
meets all year) . 
Prerequisite: 15:503. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



Vocational-Technical Education 



29:A421 



Curriculum Construction in 
Vocational-Technical Education 



A review of federal, state, county and 
community curriculums in the various Vo- 
cational-Technical Education areas. Prin- 
ciples of curriculum construction will be 
discussed in relation to the survey cur- 
riculums. 
5 semester hours Spring Semester 

29:A451 Vocational Guidance 

TTiis course is an exposure to vocational 

literature, job occupations, job satisfaction, 

and individual and group counseling 

methods. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



29:A471 Vocational-Technical 

In-Service Supervised Teaching 
Seminar 

This is a two part course which covers an 
academic year. The first part of the course, 
occurring in the first semester of enroll- 
ment, involves the student in a bi-w;eekly 
seminar and on-the-job supervision by the 
seminar instructor. The second part of the 
course, occurring in the succeeding semester 
of enrollment provides for on-the-job su- 
pervision and individual conferences. 
8 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



58 Industrial Education and Technology 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 



30:200 Introduction to School 
Library Service 

An understanding of the functions and 
services of the school library in relation to 
all other types of libraries is studied. The 
development of library science, books and 
printing, as well as censorship problems 
and the ethics of the library profession, 
are discussed. The concept of a material 
center encompassing non-book material is 
introduced. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



30 : 30 1 , 302 Reference and Bibliography, 
Part I and II 

The reference and bibliography course is 
an examination and study of the basic 
reference materials with emphasis on those 
most useful in the school library. Ency- 
clopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks, atlases, 
indexes, specialized reference books, and 
bibliographies in major subject fields are 
included. Training in the use of the catalog 
as a basic reference tool is stressed. 
Prerequisite: 30:301 for 30:302. 
2 semester hours each Spring Semester 

30:303 Fundamentals of Cataloging 
and Classification 

This course covers principles involved in 
the cataloging and classification of books, 
pamphlets, and non-book materials ac- 

ording to the Dewey Decimal System. 

Extensive practice in the application of 



these principles is provided through labora- 
tory experience. 

Prerequisite: 30:200 or the permission of 
the instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



30 :403 Reading Materials for Children 
and Youth: Selection and 
Evaluation 

This course consists of a study and evalua- 
tion of library materials provided by the 
modern school library to meet the needs 
of youth. Extensive critical reading of 
books for children and young adults is 
required. Principles of book selection are 
emphasized and experience in the use of 
selection tools is provided. The point of 
view relates the library collection to the 
total school program. 

4 semester hours Fall Semester 

30:404 Organization and Administration 
of School Libraries 

Practical experience in setting up effective 
libary routines is stressed. These routines 
include budgeting, locating sources for li- 
brary materials, purchasing materials, book 
processing, preparing library reports and 
statistics, taking inventory, planning and 
adapting library rooms and equipment, and 
evaluating library collections and services. 
Prerequisites: 30:301, 30:302, 30:303 
or permission of the instructor. 

5 semester hours Fall Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS 



^0:415 Classical Mythology 

"his course is designed to give an under- 
tanding of the classical myths which are 
jpeated again and again in the literature of 
le Western World. The origins of the 
lyths are studied through readings and 
rt, and an interpretation of their meaning 
||i discussed. 
semester hours Fall Semester 



44:408 Development of the Latin 
Language 

Study of Latin and its position in the 
Indo-European family; the evolution from 
the spoken to the literary, to the Vulgar, 
to the Christian; characteristics of the 
periods exemplified in the language; tran- 
sitional features apparent in the phonology, 
morphology, and syntax. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

Library Science/Classics 59 



DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 



05:101 and 102 Swahili I and II 

These courses are designed for students 
who desire to start Swahili in college. 
Special emphasis is placed on training the 
student to understand, speak, read, and 
write the language. 
3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



06:A425 



Methods and Materials of 
TESL 



This course will give training in the basic 
audio-lingual approach with applications 
and implications for specific teaching situa- 
tion (in particular the large New Jersey 
urban population of Spanish-speaking 
people) . Emphasis will be placed on what 
can be done at various levels of English 
with various kinds of students (children 
and adults) . 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



40:A401 The Teaching of Foreign 
Languages in Secondary 
Schools 

Focused on: values of foreign language 
teaching; ultimate and immediate aims in 
foreign language teaching; survey of the 
outstanding methods, pronunciation, oral 
work, reading, grammar, reviews, realia, 
examinations, tests and supervised study; 
the course consists of readings and discus- 
sions, lesson planning and demonstrations, 
and organization of materials for use in 
student-teaching. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

40 :422 Methods of Teaching Foreign 

Language in Elementary Schools 

This course aims at giving the student a 
thorough grasp of procedures for teaching 
children in elementary schools to under- 
stand a spoken foreign language, to learn 
as early as possible the correct pronuncia- 
tion of that language and to expose these 
children to a foreign culture by means 
of songs, stories, realia, etc. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 



41 :AlOOA and lOOB Beginning French 

These courses are designed for students 
who desire to start French in college. Spe- 
cial emphasis is placed on training the 
student to understand, speak, read and 
write the language. Laboratory work is 
part of the requirements for the courses. 
Prerequisite: Fr. lOOA for Fr. lOOB or 
equivalent. 
3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

41 :A200A and 200B Intermediate French 

These courses which form a continuation 
of Fr. lOOA and lOOB are also open to 
students who wish to minor in French but 
who lack the language proficiency necessary 
for Fr. 101 and 102, courses designed for 
majors and selected minors. Laboratory 
work is part of the requirements for the 
courses. 



Prerequisite: Fr. lOOB for Fr. 200A and 
Fr. 200A for Fr. 200B, or equivalent. 
3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



41 :A505 History of the French 
Language 

The course is designed to acquaint the stu- 
dent on the graduate level with the de- 
velopmental processes in language with 
special reference to French. It examines also 
the relationship between language change 
and cultural change. The French language 
is studied from its origins to the present^ 
time with units in Vulgar Latin, Old' 
French, Middle French, Renaissance 
French, and Modern French. At each step, 
development of phonology, morphology, 
and vocabulary are studied along with 
social backgrounds. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



60 Foreign Languages 



41:A512 Medieval Epic 

The development of the Chanson de Geste 
from its origins through the Renaissance 
period will be thoroughly studied. Atten- 
tion is paid to the specific nature of the 
main cycles and the Chanson de Roland. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

4l :A5l6 Rabelais and Montaigne 

The development of the humanistic ideal 
in the literature of the sixteenth century 
within the context of specific works by 
Rabelais and Montaigne. Special emphasis 
on Montaigne's Essais which create a novel 
conception of the individual and of inner 
life. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 



41 :A525 French Classicism 

French classical literature is studied with 
special emphasis on Moliere and the 
"moralists" of that time. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



41 :A532 18th Century French Theater 

This course is designed to give the student 
a comprehensive view of the development 
of the theater both tragedy and comedy 
during the 1 8th century. This course re- 
quires reading and analysis of the major 
plays by Voltaire, Marivaux and Beaumar- 
chais. 



2 semester hours 



Spring Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND 
ITALIAN LANGUAGES 



46 : A lOOA and A lOOB Beginning Spanish 

These courses are designed for students 
who desire to start Spanish in college. 
Emphasis is placed on the training of the 
students to understand, speak, read, and 
write language. Laboratory work is part 
of the requirements for the courses. 
Prerequisite: Span. 1 OOA for Span. lOOB 
or equivalent, 
i semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



S#' 



46:A10] 



Selected Readings: 19th and 
20th Centuries 



Representative works of the Romantic and 
Realistic movements and from the Genera- 
tion of 98 to the present are read and dis- 
cussed in class. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

46: A 103 Spanish Grammar and 
Composition 

This course is designed to give students an 
active command of the language by m.eans 
of oral and written exercises, accompanied 
by a thorough review of the grammar, vo- 
cabulary, and idioms. Required for all 
freshman majors during their first semester. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 






46 :A200A and A200B 



Intermediate 
Spanish 



These courses which form a continuation 
of Span. lOOA and lOOB are also open to 
students who wish to minor in Spanish 
but lack the language proficiency necessary 
for Span. 101, 102, courses designed for 
majors and selected minors. 

Prerequisite: Span. lOOB for Span. 200A 
and Span. 200A for Span. 200B, or 
equivalent. 

j semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



46 :A505 History of the Spanish 
Language 

A survey of the development of the 
Spanish language from its origin to the 
present day in Spain and Spanish America. 
The course traces the phonological, struc- 
tural and lexical evolution of Spanish from 
its Latin ancestor, by following the process 
of its transformation, as well as the vari- 
ous stages through which the language 
has passed from the time of its first docu- 
mentary appearance. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

Foreign Languages 61 



46 :A5 16 Survey of Medieval Spanish 
Literature 

A review of outstanding works and themes 
from Latin, Arabic, and Hebrew roots — 
expressing the main features of Spanish 
literature, culture, and thought from the 
eleventh century "Jarchas" and "Cantarcil- 
los de amigo" through the Poema del Cid 
and culminating in La Celestina and the 
advent of the Golden Age. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

46 : A 52 1 The Novel of the Golden Age 

A survey of its creation and development 
from earlier forms through a reading of 
representative works of the picaresque 
genre — from Lazarillo de Tormas to El 
Buscon — as well as the Novelas Ejem- 
plares of Cervantes, emphasizing their 
ethical and artistic values and influence in 
the main stream of European literature. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

46 : A54 1 Spanish American Novel 

to 1900 
46: A 542 Spanish American Novel 

in the XX Century 

The purpose of these courses is to acquaint 
the student, through extensive reading and 
intensive discussion, with representative 
Spanish-American novels from the 1 6th 
through the 20th century. These works in- 
clude narratives depicting life in early co- 
lonial times; the novel of adventure; the 
picaresque tale; the romantic novel; the 
psychological novel; the novel of the land; 
the sociological novel; the artistic "mod- 
ernista" novel; the political novel; the 
novel of the Mexican revolution; the so- 
cial, the neorealistic, the impressionistic, 
the philsophical and the extentialist trends 
in the novel. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



46 : A55 1 Contemporary Spanish- 
American Poetry 

This course considers the development of 
Spanish-American poetry form the anti- 
modernist reaction, and the four major 
feminine poets, as antecedent for the ap- 
preciation and evaluation of Neruda, Pel- 
licer, Mareschal, Borges, Gorostiza, Carrera 
Andrade, Florit, Villaurrutia and Octavio 
Paz. Readings from recently published 
books and poetry magazines of wide cir- 
culation in Spanish America are included. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



49:AlOOAandB Beginning Italian 

This course is designed for students with 
no previous knowledge of Italian and aims 
at imparting the basic foundation in the 
language. Its purpose is to afford the re- 
quired background in the language in 
order to embark on either minor or con- 
centration in Italian. Laboratory work is 
part of the requirements for the course. 
3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



49 : A200A and A200B Intermediate 
Italian 

This course is designed for students who 
have a knowledge of the Italian language 
that is at least equivalent to two years of 
study in High-School or the Beginning 
Italian course. Its aim is to strengthen 
further the four language skills, i.e. under- 
standing, speaking, reading and writing 
through an essentially audio-lingual ap- 
proach. Laboratory work is part of the 
requirements for the course. 
Prerequisite: Italian lOOB for Italian 
200A and Italian 200A for Italian 200B, 
or equivalent. 
3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



Hi 



62 Foreign Languages 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



50: A 101 



Introduction to Modern 
Mathematics 



This course is designed for students whose 
major interests are in fields other than 
mathematics and science. Emphasis is on 
basic concepts rather than on formal ma- 
nipulative skills. Topics include: systems 
of numeration, finite mathematical systems, 
sets, application of sets to arithmetic, 
algebra and geometry, logic and statements. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



50: A 103 



The Development of 
Mathematics 



This course examines the growth and de- 
velopment of mathematics from ancient to 
modern times. Lectures and discussions 
focus on developments in geometry, 
algebra, number theory, and analysis as 
they relate to our western culture. The 
contributions of the great mathematicians 
are considered. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



50: A 104 



Mathematics of Personal 
Finance 



This course is concerned with the applica- 
tion of mathematical concepts to the finan- 
cial aspects of modern economic behavior. 
Principles and trends are stressed. Specific 
topics include: Compound interest, analysis 
of financial security through the study of 
investments, insurance, home ownership, 
pensions, government programs, taxation, 
consumer cerdit. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



50: A 105 Elements of Statistical 
Reasoning 



I 



n this course the student is introduced to 



he basic elements of probability and statis- 
tical theory. Applications of this theory to 
social, economic and scientific problems are 
iven. Topics include: Systematic organi- 
sation, analysis and presentation of data; 
Drobability theory for finite sample spaces; 
hcoretical frequency distributions, statisti- 
al inference and tests of hypotheses; re- 
[rcssion and correlation. 
? semester hours Fall Semester 



50:A403 Techniques and Applications 
of Statistics 

This course is designed as a basic survey of 
statistical techniques as applied in the social 
and behavioral sciences. Fundamental con- 
cepts and assumptions are stressed and 
justified experimentally, although mathe- 
matical proof of theorems is strictly 
limited. Topics include: descriptive statis- 
tics, elements of probability, sampling 
procedures and sampling statistics, tests of 
hypotheses and simple design of experi- 
ments. Students are expected to have an 
adequate background in high school alge- 
bra. This course is offered as a general 
education elective and may not be taken 
for credit by mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: 50:105. (Not ofl^ered every 
year.) 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



50:A425X Advanced Calculus I 

This course develops the calculus of a func- 
tion of one variable as a mathematical sys- 
tem. On the basis of postulates for the real 
numbers, the concepts of function, limit, 
sequence, infinite series, power series, con- 
tinuity, uniform continuity, differentia- 
tion, and integration will be rigorously de- 
veloped. Topics considered include: Archi- 
medean principle, density of the rationals 
intermediate value theorem. Heine-Borek 
theorem, mean value theorem, Cauchy con- 
vergence criterion, existence theorems and 
uniform convergence theorems. 
Prerequisite: 50:222 or the equivalent. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



50:A426X Advanced Calculus II 

This course presents a rigorous treatment 
of the calculus of functions of several vari- 
ables, together with the development of 
the theory of Fourier series. Topics in- 
clude: Green's theorem, Stoke's Theorem, 
Divergence theorem, implicit function 
theorem, inverse function theorem, Reim- 
mann-Lebesque lemma and Cesaro con- 
vergence. 

Prerequisite: 50:425. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

Mathematics 63 



50:A428X Introduction to Topology 

Topological spaces, metric spaces, con- 
tinuity compactness, connectedness, and 
separability properties are considered. 
Topological generalizations of basic con- 
tinuity theorems of advanced calculus are 
emphasized . 
Prerequisite: 50:425. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



50 : A43 IX Foundations of Modern 
Algebra 

This course is a study of algebraic struc- 
tures and the fundamental concepts of 
algebra. Topics include: groups, rings, in- 
tegral domains, fields and important exam- 
ples of these abstract systems. 
Prerequisite: 50:335. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



50:A433 Theory of Numbers 

Elementary methods will be used to study 
the properties of integers, congruences, 
quadratic reciprocity law, primitive roots, 
diophantine equations, continued fractions, 
algebraic numbers, lattice points and parti- 
tions. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



50:A450X Foundations of Geometry 

In this course a study is made of the Hil- 
bert postulates and the BirkhofF-Beatley 
postulates of Euclidean geometry. The 
course includes a comparison of the non- 
Euclidean geometries and a brief introduc- 
tion to synthetic and analytic projective 
geometry. 

Prerequisite: 50:350. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



50:A46lX Introduction to Computer 
Science 

This course includes: basic theory of digital 
computers: techniques of programming in 
Basic and Fortran languages; applications 
to the solution of problems in the natural 
sciences. 

Prerequisite: 50:215 or 50:221 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 



2 semester hours 



64 Mathematics 



Fall Semester 



50:A470 Teaching of Mathematics — 
Senior High School 

This course covers the selection, organiza- 
tion, and presentation of mathematics in 
the senior high shcool. Topics include: 
organization of classroom activities, lesson 
planning, techniques of motivation, eval- 
uation, use of multi-sensory aids, and ap- 
plications of established principles of 
learning. These topics will emphasize the 
methods and materials of teaching con- 
temporary programs of geometry, inter- 
mediate algebra, and twelfth grade 
pre-college mathematics. Observation and 
participation in the campus demonstration 
high school is required. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 



50:A520 Set Theory 

Topics include the following: historical 
development, paradoxes, ordered sets, 
Schroder-Berstein theorem, axiom of 
choice, transfinite induction, cardinal and 
ordinal numbers. 



Prerequisite: 50:222. 
2 semester hours 



Spring Semester 



li 
an 

Kt 



50:A525and 50:A526 Complex 
Variables I and II 

Integration and differentiation in the com- 
plex domain, Cauchy's theorem, Cauchy's 
integral formula, Laurent expansion, resi- 
dues, elements of conformal mapping, 
series and product representations. 

Prerequisite: 50:425 Advanced Calculus 
or equivalent. 

2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



50 :A527 Functional Analysis I 

Banach and Hilbert spaces, linear func 
tionals, Hahn-Banach theorem, dual spaces, 
linear operators, closed graph theorem, uni- 
form boundedness theorem, Riesz theory 
for compact operators, spectral theory. 

Prerequisite: 50:522 or 526. 



2 semester hi 



Spring Semestet 



50:A531 and 50:A532 Abstract 
Algebra I and II 

Study of some of the basic algebraic struc- 
tures including field theory, Galois theory, 
ideals, modules, laticcs and semi-groups. 
Prerequisite: 50:431. 

Foundations of Modern Algebra or equiva- 
lent. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

50: A 54 3 and A 544 Mathematical 
Statistics I and II 

This course is concerned with making in- 
ferences from sample data and with 
evaluating risks connected with these 
procedures. Topics include: sampling dis- 
tributions, point and interval estimation, 
tests of hypotheses, and elementary analysis 
of variance. Optional topics include: re- 
gression and correlation, non-parametric 
statistics and decision theory. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

50:A555 Differential Geometry 

The application of vectors to the study of 
classical three dimensional geometry. Top- 
ics include: plane and space curves, first 
and second fundamental forms, lines of 
curvature, asymptotic lines, geodesies, the- 
orems of Meusnier, Euler, Gauss, and 
Codazzi. 

Prerequisite: 50:222. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A560 Numerical Analysis I 

This course deals with the determination 
lof functions from observed experimental 
data. Topics include: polynomial approxi- 
mation, interpolation, numerical integra- 
tion, numberical solution of equations, 
linear algebraic equations, matrix inversion 
and eigenvalue analysis, numerical solution 

f ordinary and partial differential equa- 

ions. 

'rcrequisite: 50:5 35 or permission of the 
nstructor. 
semester hours Spring Semester 

>0:A564 and A565 Ordinar> Differenrial 
Equations I and II 

Existence and uniqueness of solutions, 
)criodic solutions, linear and non-linear 



systems, singularities, special functions, 
stability theory. 

Prerequisite: 50:335 and 525 or equiva- 
lent. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

5():A570 Administration and Supervision 
of Mathematics 

This course is concerned with the problems 
of organization, administration and su- 
pervision in the mathematics program of 
the school. The functions, duties and 
qualifications of the supervisor are investi- 
gated. Current problems and research find- 
ings are used to assist in the formation of 
objectives. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A572 Teaching of General 
Mathematics 

This course is concerned with mathematics 
programs for the non-college-bound high 
school student. Reports and recomenda- 
tions from curriculum studies are ex- 
amined. Among the topics considered are: 
basic characteristics and needs of non- 
academic students, preparation and use of 
resource materials, classroom teaching tech- 
niques, and methods of motivation. Em- 
phasis is given to the development of suit- 
able curricula for non-academic students. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A574 Problem Analysis in 

Secondary Mathematics 

The psychology and techniques of solving. 

Discovery and heuristic methods. Intuitive 

and inductive reasoning in the solution of 

non-routine problems from high school 

mathematics. Problem formation and test 

construction. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 



50:A590 



Research Seminar in 
Mathematics Education 



This course is designed to give graduate 
students an opportunity to investigate and 
apply the techniques of research in the 
field of mathematics education. Various 
projects are discussed and each member se- 
lects and presents a research topic on his 
own. 

Prerequisite: 15:503. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

Mathematics 65 



The following courses are open only to National Science Foundation 
participants. Students have already been selected and registrations are closed. 
These courses are listed here for record purposes only. 



50:A461X 



Introduction to Computer 
Science 



This course includes: basic theory of 
digital computers; techniques of pro- 
gramming in Basic and Fortran lan- 
guages; applications to the solution of 
problems in the natural sciences. 
Prerequisite: 50:215 or 50:221 or 
permission of the instructor. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



50:A575 



Selected Topics in 
Mathematics 



A selection of topics associated with 
the secondary and early college years 
of mathematics will be investigated 
from an advanced point of view. 
Topics will be selected to give the 
teacher a broader view from such areas 
as algebra, geometry, linear program- 
ming and game theory, real and com- 
plex analysis, probability and statistics. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



60:A100 Introduction to Music 

This course aims to enlarge the student's 
horizon of musical awareness. Emphasis is 
placed upon stimulating the enjoyment of 
music rather than on building up a body of 
facts about it. By means of live musical 
performance and by directed listening to 
recorded music the student becomes ac- 
quainted with music which should be the 
possession of every educated person. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:160 Introduction to Music 
Therapy I 

The course is planned as an introductory 
course for students majoring in music 
therapy, or for students from other areas 
of music study who may want some in- 
formation about this related field. The 
major emphasis in the course is on descrip- 
tion of the patients that are referred to 
music therapists. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:261 Introduction to Music 
Therapy II 

The course is a continuation of Introduc- 
tion to Music Therapy I, but the emphasis 
is on the attitude of the therapist and 
society toward the patient. The ways in 

66 Mathematics/Music 



which attitudes are formed and can be 
changed are considered. The function of 
the music therapist is considered for each 
type of patient that is usually encountered 
in a music therapy department. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A408 Chamber Music 

A survey of vocal and instrumental music 
composed for from one to ten performers, 
one per part, from the Renaissance through 
the modern era. Analysis will be made of 
both compositional style and the nature 
of chamber genres themselves. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60 : A409 Development of the Opera 

A study of opera from Monteverdi to the 
present, with detailed analysis of represen- 
tative works. Emphasis is on the use of 
music for the furtherance of plot and 
characterization. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A426 Survey of Music Literature 

This course is designed for the general stu- 
dent and includes a study of folk song, art 
song, oratorio, opera, idealized dance 
forms, instrumental suites, sonata form, 






iiiir 



in 



the symphony, and symphonic poem. 
Abundant use of musical illustration, di- 
rected listening, and participation acquaint 
the student with great masterpieces of 
music which should be the possession of 
every educated person. A humanities elec- 
tive. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:460 Recreational Music 

A study of the use of music in leisure 
time. Both group and individual music 
activities are included. Skill in leading 
group recreational activities will be em- 
phasized. Informal instruments are in- 
troduced, and techniques of teaching these 
instruments to people with limited musical 
backgrounds are included. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:461 Influence of Music on Behavior 

Although the course is intended primarily 
or seniors in music therapy it may also be 
Df interest to other music students. Music, 
IS a form of human behavior, will be 
nvestigated. Tlie effects of music on be- 
lavior and its relationship to health is 
mphasized. Prerequisite: senior status in 
. music major, 4 hours of Biology, 3 
lOurs of Sociology, 3 hours of Psychology, 
nd 3 hours of Anthropology. 
! semester hours Fall Semester 

"0:462 Music in Therapy 

""cchniques and activities of a music 
herapist are considered in relationship to 
he various categories of treatment. The 
ffect of the therapist's personality and 
ttitudes, in addition to the music activity, 

investigated. 

rerequisite: Inflluend of Music on Be- 
avior and Psychological Foundations of 
lusic I. 

semester hours Spring Semester 

p:463 Psychological Foundations of 
Music I 

udy of the psychological aspects of 
usic. Factors effecting musical percep- 
on will be stressed. Music as an acousti- 
1 phenomena and, experimental investiga- 
which demonstrates this, will be 
viewed. Measurement and diagnosis of 



musical ability will be included. 
Prerequisite: Accoustics and a 3 hour 
course in [Psychology. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:464 Psychological Foundations of 
Music II 

Techniques of conducting and reporting 
research on the psychological aspects of 
music. The student will be guided in 
several research projects. 
Prerequisite: Psychological Foundations of 
Music I and Influence of Music on Be- 
havior. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60 : A503A & B Applied Music I and II : 
Primary Instrument 

Study of performance in the student's 
major area of expression in a manner 
suited to those specializing in the areas of 
Music Education of Theory-Composition. 
Fifteen one-hour lessons, private instruc- 
tion. Admission by audition only. 
Special fee: $150 each. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A504and A505 Applied Music III 
and IV : Primary 
Instrument 

Intensive study in the major performing 
area for students majoring in Applied 
Music. Two recitals of professional cali- 
ber are to be prepared as a result of the 
two semesters of work. 
Admission by audition only, and open 
only to majors in Applied Music. Fifteen 
one-hour lessons per semester. Special fee: 
$ 1 50 per semester. 
6 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A506 and A507 Applied Music V 
and VI 

Intensive study in the major area of per- 
formance similar to that offered under 
60:504 and 505, but spread over three 
semesters of work instead of two. Open to 
students in Applied Music, each of whom 
must audition. Fifteen one-hour lessons 
per semester. Special fee: $150 per semes- 
ter. 
4 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

Music 67 



60:A5l4 Counterpoint 

Analysis and composition of polyphonic 
techniques as evidenced in inventions, 
canons, and motets, based on the several 
compositional styles of Western music. 
Prerequisite: 60:512 or equivalent. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



60:A519 



The Kodaly System in 
Music Education 



An examination of the procedures involved 
in using the Kodaly materials and techni- 
ques in teaching music reading and com- 
prehension. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



60:A52lC 



Classroom Methods : 
Woodwind Instruments 



Elementary and secondary classroom meth- 
ods in the medium, dealing with principles, 
materials and methods in teaching groups 
of students. Especially designed for teach- 
ers wishing to exchange or learn new 
approaches to classroom techniques. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



60:A525 An Ethnological Approach 
to Music 

A study of music outside the area of 
Western art music. Included is examination 
of ethnic roots and influences, theory, 
media, and performance practices. Both 
folk and professional idioms of the Far 
East, Near East, Africa, Europe, and the 
Americas will be considered. Study for 
non-majors will emphasize musical ex- 
perience and social-cultural background, 
while music majors will also pursue a more 
technical approach. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



60:A526 Jazz 

A detailed study of jazz as an art form, 
its impact upon music and other contem- 
porary arts, and the sociological impact of 
it in American and world culture. Qualified 
musicians in the class will also examine 
specific performance techniques. 
2 semester hours 

Fall and Spring Semesters 

60 : A 5 3 5 Ensemble Band I 

Rehearsal and performance of band and 
wind ensemble literature. Admission by 
audition only. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A536 Ensemble: Band II 

The second semester of 60:535. Rehearsal 
and performance of band and wind en- 
semble literature. Admission by audition 
only. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A537 Ensemble: Orchestra I 

Rehearsal and performance of orchestral 
repertoire. Admission by audition only 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60 : A538 Ensemble : Orchestra II 

The second semester of 60:5 3 7. Rehearsal 
and performance of orchestral repertoire. 
Admission by audition only. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A539 Master Class in Musical 

Performance: German Vocal 
Literature 

Coaching in groups of small numbers o: 
students in refinements of performance 
including stylistic interpretation, program 
ming interpretive analysis, diction, etc 
Open through audition only. Both pianist 
and vocalists may register. 
2 semester hours Spring Semeste 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 



63 : A203 Ethics 



An examination of the nature of ethical 
judgments, the meaning of moral concepts, 
the conditions of moral responsibility and 
the methodological presuppositions of 
ethical theories. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

68 Music 



63:A270 History of Religion 

A survey of the theological and ecdesiastica 
developments of the major living religion 
of the world with an emphasis on Judaisn 
and Christianity. 

2 semester hours Spring Semeste 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 



I 



65: A 100 Cieneral Psychology 

Survey of concepts, research methods ancl 
findings in such areas as: growth and 
development, motivated and emotional 
behavior, learning and thinking, indi- 
vidual differences, group processes, social 
behavior, personality, behavior disorders. 
Emphasis is on psychology as a behavioral 
science and application to practical life 
situations. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



65:A2{)0 Educational Psychology 

Designed primarily for students who in- 
tend to enter the teaching profession. 
Topics include: concepts in child and 
adolescent development; fundamentals of 
learning theory as applied to classroom 
situations, learning inhibition and aca- 
demic nonachievement, personal-social 
adjustment, measuring and evaluating 
teaching-learning. 
Prerequisite: 65:100. 
3 semester hours 



Spring Semester 



65:A201 Child Psychology 

Extensive study of growth, development 
and behavior of children. Physical, in- 
tellectual, social and emotional develop- 
ment and their interaction. Scientific 
method exemplified through the litera- 
ture and intensive study of individual 
children. 

Prerequisite: 65:100. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



65:A510 Research Methdos in 
Psychology 

An introduction to research and its appli- 
cation to practical problems. 
Prerequisite: One course in psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semester 

65:A520 Proseminar I 

Learning and motivation (first half term) ; 
personality and abnormal psychology 
;(second half term) . 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



65:A521 Proseminar II 

Sensation and perception (first half term) ; 
social psychology (second half term). 
Prerequisite: 65 :520. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A54() Remediation of Basic Skills 

Theory and techniques in helping children 
who are having difficulty in basic skills. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A54l Curriculum Development & 
Methods of Teaching 
Inner City Children 

Problems in teaching in the inner city 
schools and the special needs of the inner 
city child will be considered. Innovations 
in teaching methods related to current 
research findings will be considered. Prac- 
ticum experiences will be coordinated with 
course materials. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A545 



Seminar: Emotional 
Disturbances of Childhood 



Survey of research findings in the field of 
child psychopathology, with particular 
relationship to the problem of education. 
Material from the practicum will be used. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A549 Psychology of the Adult 
Learner 

This course considers methods and ma- 
terials of learning which can be adapted 
to the educational needs of adults. Par- 
ticular emphasis will be placed on topics: 
identifying educational needs, understand- 
ing problems of the adult learner, over- 
coming learning difficulties, motivation and 
other factors affecting effective learning 
and counseling procedures. The course is 
individually programmed commensurate 
with the student's background and pro- 
fessional goals. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



Psychology 69 



6 5 : A 5 50 Quantitative and Statistical 
Methods 

Principles and techniques of data analysis 

in psychology. Training of psychological 

phenomenon, estimation of parameters, 

and hypothesis testing. 

Prerequisite: Statistics and 65:521. 

5 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



65:A552 General Social Psychology 

Theory, methodology, and research find- 
ings. Topics include: biological basis of 
social behavior, socialization, attitudes 
development and change, value systems, 
group processes and conflict. 
Prerequisite: one course in general psy- 
chology. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



65:A553 Urban Psychology 

Primary focus and psychological develop- 
ment of the disadvantaged. Biogenetic 
prospectives, intellectual and language 
development, motivation and scholastic 
achievement, personality and the self- 
concept, environmental intervention. 
Prerequisite: One course in general psy- 
chology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

665 : A560 Advanced Educational 
Psychology 

This course focuses on the learner and 
the learning process in school situations. 
The topics include: motivation; acquisi- 
tion of skills, ideas and attitudes; tech- 
nological and other innovations in teach- 
ing and learning; and evaluation of 
teaching-learning. 

Prerequisite: an introductory course in 

psychology. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A56l Developmental Psychology 

Theoretical issues and research findings on 
mental processes from pre-natal life to 
senescence. 

Prerequisite: One course in general psy- 
chology. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



65 : A562 Dynamics of Human Behavior 

Consideration is given to the relationship 
of social forces to mental health. Emphasis 
is placed on environmental factors which 
contribute towards behavioral and learn- 
ing pathologies. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A563 Theories of Learning 

Reviews the phenomena of current learn- 
ing theory and research and their impli- 
cations for education. 

Prerequisite: Two courses in psychology 
or special permission of the instructor. 
Some background in biology is recom- 
mended. 65:550. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65 :A564 Psychology and Education of 
the Psysically and Mentally 
Handicapped Children 

This course surveys current practices and 
problems in the education of the children 
with physical and mental handicaps. It is 
designed for teachers, counselors, super- 
visors, and administrators who may work 
with one or more such children or who 
may wish to prepare for school and 
community leadership in developing fa- 
cilities for such children. 
Prerequisite: A course in developmental 
psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65 : A565 Psychology and Education of 
Socially and Emotionally 
Handicapped Children 

This course surveys practice and problems 
in the education of socially and emo- 
tionally handicapped children. 
Prerequisite: a course in developmental 
psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A566 Psychology and Education 
of the Gifted 

This course is designed to present a com- 
plete picture of the bright and gifted 
young people in contemporary American 
life. It surveys the various practices in- 
volved in their education, as well as the 
psychological characteristics of this group 
and socio-emotional development. 
Prerequisite : 65:561. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



70 Psychology 



65: A 567 Abnormal Psychology 

Models and selected research in psycho- 
pathology. Topics include: psychopathic 
physical illness, psychosomatic, somato- 
psychic disorders, neurosis, psychosis, en- 
vironmental factors in relation to organic 
factors. 

Prerequisite: 65:561 and 65:580. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



65:A568 Psychology of Group Dynamics 

This experience will combine a basic 
foundation in theories of group dynamics 
and illustrative applications to industry, 
marital, political, interracial, and pro- 
fessional life, along with the personal 
participation by the student in a group, 
interactive process. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A573 Physiological Psychology 

An investigation of physiological corre- 
lates of behavior v/'nh emphasis on the 
sensory apparatus as well as the major 
neuro-endocrine integrating relationships 
as seen in more complex behaviors, such 
as emotion, the primary drives, and 
arousal states. 

Prerequisites: one course in psychology 
and biology or by special permission of 
instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



65:A574 Individual Intelligence Testing 

Administration, scoring, and interpreta- 
tion of individual intelligence tests. Each 
student is required to develop competence 
in the use of the Stanford-Binet Scale 
and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for 
children. 

Prerequisite: Approved certification can- 
didacy in the school psychology program. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



■ 



65:A575 Projective Techniques I 

Presents the basic instruments of projec- 
ive testing, particularly the Rorschach and 

Thematic Apperception Tests, both from 
he standpoint of basic research and of 



the mechanics of administration and 
scoring. 

Prerequisite: Approved certification candi- 
dacy in the school psychology program. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A5'76 Projective Testing 
Techniques II 

This course enables the student to move 
from the theoretical to the practical appli- 
cation of projective tests. Each student is 
required to administer, score and analyze 
individual cases. The major emphasis is 
on the Rorschach and Thematic Apper- 
ception Tests. 

Prerequisite: Projective Tests I 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A578 Psychological Tests and 
Measurements 

Theory, construction and application of 

psychological tests. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A580 Personality 

Major theories and clinical and experi- 
mental findings. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A581 Motivation 

Nature and development of motives and 

its role in social adjustment. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A582 Behavior Modification 

Surveys of issues, principles, practices and 
research with focus on recent innovations: 
individual, family, and group. 
Prerequisite: 65:563 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A590 Diagnostic Case Studies 

Learning to use diagnostic material and 
learning to write up diagnostic findings. 
Students are involved in the understand- 
ing of the unique value of various diag- 
nostic tools and the criteria for selection 
of each in relation to the present school 
problem. 

Prerequisite: 65:575. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Psychology 71 



65 :A592 Special Diagnostic Techniques 

This course is designed for students who 
are already competent in basic individual 
testing techniques. Various specialized 
tests and techniques will be covered in 
this course with emphasis on the evalua- 
tion of handicapped children. 
Prerequisites: 65:574, 576 and permis- 
sion of the graduate advisor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65 : A593 Clinical Interviewing 

This course provides selection trainees in 
advanced psychology programs with the 
opportunity to learn clinical interviewing 
under rigid supervision, and as an essen- 
tial part of a practicum experience. Diag- 
nostic features of interviewing will be 
stressed, and inter-personal relationships 
between the psychologist and the client 
will be analyzed in depth. 
Prerequisite: permission of the graduate 
advisor. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A660 Seminar in Educational 
Psychology 

This seminar is designed primarily to 
provide an opportunity for graduate 
students in psychology to investigate and 
apply the techniques of research in the 
psychology field. 

Prerequisite: 65:510 and matriculation 
for M.A. degree in psychology or candi- 
dacy for certification in school psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



65:A66l Practicum in School 
Psychology 

Provides closely supervised experience by 
staff personnel in assessment, counseling 
and consultation procedures. Designed to 
increase competency in psychological 
techniques required in school settings. 
Prerequisite: Approved certification candi- 
dacy in the school psychology program 
and permission of the graduate advisor. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A662 School Psychologist Externship 

Students are placed in cooperating school 
districts to serve as apprentice psycholo- 
gists. A fully certified school psychologist 
employed in the cooperating district will 
supervise the student, in addition to thr 
college supervisor, who will make periodic 
visits and conduct a series of seminars 
to be scheduled on campus. 
Prerequisite: approved certification candi- 
dacy in school psychology. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



65:A663 Independent Study 

Under faculty supervision the student 
works independently in (1) reading, (2) 
field experiences, or (3) research outside 
of the thesis. Student selects one area 
per semester for 1, 2, or 3 semester hours. 
Prerequisite: permission from graduate 
advisor and instructor. 

7-3 semester hours Fall Semester 



72 Psychology 



PANZER SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND HYGIENE 

Health Education 



73: A 100 Healthful Living 

The purpose of this course is to aid the stu- 
dent in achieving and maintaining opti- 
mum health and to understand the princi- 
ples on which it is founded. Among the 
topics covered are: prevention and treat- 
ment of diseases, grooming, nutrition and 
weight control, the effects of alcohol and 
narcotics, marriage and parenthood, and 
he community aspects of health. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



73:A408 Driver Education 

basic course for the certification of 
Driver Education teachers. The course con- 
ists of a minimum of 40 hours of class 
ecitation and/or discussion and 20 hours 
)f practical experience, 
rerequisite: Driver's license and three 
ears of satisfactory driving experience. 
^JOTE : Students must be recommended 
)y their high school principal and have 
n interview with the instructor before 
cgistration. This course may not be used 
n any Master's degree program. 
semester hours Fall and Spring Semeters 



3 : A4 1 3 The Drug Abuse Problem 

V workshop in drug abuse planned for thz 

pper class graduate student and in-service 
cacher. The workshop is concerned with 

e physiological, sociological and psycho- 
logical problems associated with drug 
ibuse. Outstanding resource personnel will 
e utilized as well as current literature, 
udio-visual aids, and other materials. The 

elusion of this vital topic in the school 
urriculum will be considered. 

semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



3:A414 



Workshop in Venereal 
Disease Education 



'his workshop course is designed primarily 
3r the in-service teacher and upper class 



undergraduate students. A study of epi- 
demiology, Federal, State, and local con- 
trol programs, pathology, treatment, and 
legal aspects of venereal disease will be 
undertaken. Particular emphasis will be 
placed on teenage incidence of venereal 
disease, and educational implementation 
will be a primary consideration. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



73:A502 Safety: Man and Environment 

This course is designed to provide a basic 
understanding in all aspects of safety, as 
they relate to man's environment. This 
offering deals essentially with the presen- 
tation of pertinent safety information, 
the main thrust of which is provided by 
a problem solving approach to various 
aspects of the environment which pose a 
particular threat to man's safe and health- 
ful existence. Special attention is given to 
the problems of air pollution, water 
pollution, congestion, noise, protection 
from fire and disaster, and various other 
safety considerations. 
3 semester hours 



73:A516 



Spring Semester 



Community and Environmental 
Aspects of Health 



This course deals essentially with environ- 
mental health problems of the community. 
It provides a comprehensive survey of 
major health problems that effect the local 
as well as the state, federal and inter- 
national scene. Air and water pollution, 
malnutrition, communicable disease, mental 
health, maternal and infant care, safety, 
drug abuse. environmental sanitation, 
waste disposal, food protection, and 
various other topics are presented against 
a background of rapidly changing politi- 
cal, social, and economic conditions. Spe- 
cial attention is directed toward the 
structure, function, and operation of 
various community organizations, official 
and voluntary, which deal with these 
problems. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Health Education 73 



73:A525 



History and Foundations 
of Health 



The history of the health movement is 
traced from 1000 B.C. to the present 
with special emphasis on certain periods 
that serve as landmarkes in man's progress 
in health promotion. The unique role of 
the school as one agency in health pro- 
motion is considered in depth. The founda- 
tions for programs of health are studied 
in relation to scientific advancements and 
prevailing philosophies. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



73:A526 Curriculum Development in 
Health Education 

Ihe purpose of this course is to provide 
the student with opportunities to improve 
his skills and techniques in curriculum 
construction. The framework of the cur- 
riculum and criteria for selection of cur- 
ricular experiences will be undertaken. A 
review and analysis of appropriate teach- 
ing methods, materials, and evaluation 
procedures will also be considered. 
Prerequisite: A methods course in Health 
Education. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



73 :A528 The Evaluation of Health 

The procedures useful in determining the 

effectiveness of the school health program 

and its several phases are considered. The 

purposes of evaluation, devices available, 

and administrative problems are discusses. 

The development and interpretation of 

evaluation devices are an important part 

of the course. 

Prerequisite: A methods course in Health 

Education. 

5 semester hours Spring Semesier 



73:A603 



Research Seminar in 
Health Education 



The purpose of this course is to examine 
the principles upon which research if 
based in health and to familiarize students 
with important studies, programs, person 
nel and techniques employed in research 
in this area. Each student will be required 
to complete a research project which must 
be presented to the physical educatior 
faculty for approval. The course runs foi 
two semester with specially schedulec 
class sessions and individual conferences. 
Prerequisite: 15:503. 
3 semester hours Fall Semestei 



Physical Education 



76:A552 



Seminar in Current Problems 
in Men's Athletics 



The organization and administration of 
intramural and intcrscholastic athletic pro- 
grams will be considered in this course. 
Current practices related to crowd control, 
scheduling, promotion of the program, 
personnel, and other persistent problems 
identified by the students will be discussed. 
Trends in such areas as sports medicine, 
coaching, and officiating will also be con- 
sidered. 



activities for conditioning for both th 
athlete and non-athlete. 
Prerequisite: Courses in the preventiot 
and care of athletic injuries, kinesiology 
and physiology of exercise. 

3 semester hours Fall Semeste 



76:A555 Scientific Analysis of Sport and 
Physical Education Skills 



Ikp 



3 semester hours 



Fall Semester 



76:A554 Orientation in Sports Medicine 

New techniques, materials, modalities, and 
problems related to the prevention and 
care of athletic injuries will be covered. 
Appropriate current developments in the 
field of sports medicine will be discussed 
and studied along with new concepts and 

74 Physical Education 



This course is concerned with the principle; 
of efficient movement as determine! 
through research in allied fields. A stud 
of mechanical and physiological principle 
will be undertaken to emphasize thcii 
importance in accelerating and improvin 
motor learning as well as efficient bod^ 
movement. Laboratory exercises, projects 
and demonstrations will be the primar 
methods involved. 



3 semester hours 



Spring Semeste, 



76:A557 Perceptual Motor Learning in 
Physical Education 

This course is designee! to help the physical 
educator to be aware of motor learning 
problems as they relate to perception; to 
be able to identify children with possible 
perceptual motor learning problems and 
to prepare programs to help children with 
these problems. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

76:A5"'5 Philosophical and 

Sociological Foundations of 
Physical Education 

A brief review of the history of physical 
education with emphasis on the develop- 
ment of physical education in the United 
States is undertaken, examining the factors 
which had the greatest influence. A study 
of current sociological and philosophic 
factors that affect modern physical edu- 
cation practices and methods are also ex- 
amined, as well as the scientific founda- 
tion upon which physical education is 
based. 

Prerequisite: A course covering the history 
and principles of physical education. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

76:A577 Administration and 

Supervision in Physical 
Education 

This course will concern itself with the 
role of the teacher and administrator in 
supervision in physical education. Tech- 
niques of interviews, visitation, confcr- 
nce and others will be studied in reference 



to their use with student teachers, begin- 
ning teachers, and experienced teachers. 
Supervision of both physical education and 
classroom teachers will be considered. 
Prerequisite: 3 years of teaching experience. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

76:A579 Advanced Tests and 

Measurements in Ph\sical 
Education 

A survey will be made of the development 
of new tests and techniques for determin- 
ing levels of skill, status in growth and 
development, and for the various qualities 
which contribute to total physical fitness. 
Advanced techniques for processing data 
also will be considered. 
Prerequisite: A course in educational sta- 
tistics. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

76:A603 Research Seminar in 
Physical Education 

The purpose of this course is to examine 
the principles upon which research is based 
in physical education and to familiarize 
students with important studies, programs, 
personnel and techniques employed in re- 
search in this area. Each student will be 
required to complete a research project 
which must be presented to the physical 
education faculty for approval. TTje course 
runs for two semesters with specially 
scheduled class sessions and individual con- 
ferences. 

Prerequisite : 1 5 :503. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



SCIENCE COURSES 



?0:A401 



iFhe purposes are: to review the educational 

objectives of science in the public schools: 

'- ^o consider a program of science instruction 

.^*'; or secondary schools including the new 

itina; )rograms: to study aids to instruction such 



Teaching of Science in 
Secondarv Schools 



s texts, manuals, workbooks, tests and 
nrichment materials; to make a critical 



ni ^pevicw of evaluation in science classes; and 
o observe and participate in junior high 
chool classes at work. 



80:A4l() A & B Junior High School 
Science I and II 

These courses cover the methods of ex- 
perimental instruction appropriate to 
grades seven, eight, and nine. A detailed 
study is made of demonstrations for gen- 
eral science at their levels. 
2 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



f 



semester hours 



Spring Semester 



Physical Education/Science 75 



80:A418 Three Centuries of Science 
Progress 

This course includes a study of fundamen- 
tal world changes that have resulted in the 
past three hundred years from scientific 
discoveries. Stress is given to the nature 
of scientific inquiry, its cumulative nature, 
its desire for freedom and means of judging 
the probable fruitfulness of a research 
problem. The role the man of science oc- 
cupies in the world today is contrasted 
with his counterpart in earlier centuries. 

5 semester hours Spring Semester 



80: A 505 Research Seminar in Science 

This course is designed to afford oppor- 
tunity for graduate students in science, 
supervisors, and science teachers: (1) to 
investigate research in science education ; 
(2) to organize science experiences and 
science information with the teaching ma- 
terials for the public schools. Each mem- 
ber of the group selects a project. This 
project must be presented to the science 
faculty and graduate students for evalua- 
tion. 

Prerequisites: Matriculation for M.A. de- 
gree in science, concurrent registration in 
15:503, or permission of the instructor. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 



81:Al00 Biological Sciences 

The organization and behavior of plants 
and animals are treated in a manner devised 
to develop understanding of man's struc- 
ture and behavior. Mechanisms of heredity 
and evolutionary change are considered. An 
understanding of how a balance may be 
achieved among living things is developed 
to show desirable land use and good agri- 
culture and forest practices. Class lectures 
and discussions are supplemented with 
slides, moving pictures, laboratory experi- 
ments, and field trips. 
4 semester hours Fall Semester 

81:A4l4 Field Ornithology 

New Jersey is one of the best areas in the 
East for the study of birds. On the Mont- 
clair campus alone, over 130 species have 
been observed. This course deals primarily 
with the identification and natural history 
of birds. A variety of habitats is visited so 
that one may become acquainted with the 
habits and requirement of this unusually 
well-adapted vertebrate type. 
Prerequisite: A year of biology or the 
equivalent. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

81:A512 General Ecology 

This course considers basic ecological prin- 
ciples and concepts. The habitat approach 
is followed with appropriate field exer- 
cises in fresh water, marine and terrestrial 
ecology. Intra and interspecific relation- 



ships are stressed with all living members 
of the ecosystem. Practical applications of 
quantitative and qualitative methods will 
be stressed. Radioecology will be explored. 
In every case the role of man in relation 
to his environment will be central. Each 
student will choose a problem in either 
plant or animal ecology and do appro- 
priate research in field and library and 
report on such activity. 
Prerequisite: General Botany, General Zo 
ology, Plant Taxonomy, or equivalent 
some physical science. 
4 semester hours Fall Semester' 



81 :A531 Comparative Human Anatomy 

A study of man's physical, physiological 

and behavioral aspects in the framework, 

and by the methodological approach of, 

comparative anatomy. 

Prerequisite: A year course in general zo 

ology and a course in human anatomy andi 

physiology. 

4 semester hours Spring Semestet 

8 1 : A54 1 Intermediary Metabolism 

This course will study the interrelationshif 
of metabolic paths in plants, animals anc 
micro-organisms. Biochemical unity am 
diversity will be explored, and new know 
ledge on regulatory mechanisms will b 
examined. The course will emphasize bio 
chemical activity in relation to the struc 
tural integrity of living organisms. 
3 semester hours Fall Semeste 



76 Science 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



82: A 100 Introductory Chemistry 

A non-laboratory survey course in modern 
chemistry for non-science majors. 
Prerequisite: None. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

82 :A420 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

This course offers opportunity for intensive 
and systematic study of the elements in the 
light of the periodic classification. Selected 
theories and principles of inorganic chemis- 
try and some of their applications are 
studied in detail. A study is made of types 
of compounds. Directed use of chemical 
literature is an important part of this 
course. Individual experimental work in 
the laboratory consists chiefly of prepara- 
tion and purification of inorganic com- 
pounds and testing for impurities in the 
products. 
Prerequisite: General Chemistry. 

4 semester hours Fall Semester 

82:A435 Biochemistry 

In this course a study is made of the com- 
position of living organisms, their nutri- 
tional requirements, their mechanism for 
promoting and regulating chemical action, 
and their metabolism of foods. A labora- 
tory study is made of the compounds of 
foods, enzyme action, isolation of proteins, 
etc., blood and urine analysis. 
rPrercquisite : Organic Chemistry. 
4 semester hours Spring Semester 

S2:A530 Qualitative Organic Analysis 

The primary aim of this course is to 
acquaint the student with the methods of 
.dentification of unknown organic sub- 
.tances. The value, and difference between 
his and many other laboratory courses. 
Is that as yet no scheme has been devised 



which reduces the course to the mere fol- 
lowing of directions. At every step in the 
analysis, the student is required to exercise 
his own judgment. He must rely on his 
faculties for observation and originality 
in planning his work in order to attain a 
complete and successful characterization of 
an unknown organic compound. 
Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry. 
4 semester hours Fall Semester 

82:A546 Chemistry Spectroscopy 

This course is designed for students who 
have had a course in general chemistry and 
organic chemistry at some previous stage 
of training. The course material will cover 
line and band spectra in their essential 
relations to atomic and molecular structure. 
At the same time, essentials of experimental 
technique and instrumentation will be dis- 
cussed, thus introducing the graduate stu- 
dent to research in this field. 
Prerequisite: 82:101. 102. 230, 231- 
General and Organic Chemistry. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



These two courses are open to 
N.S.F. participants only. 
82:A415 and 4 16 Modern 

Chemistrv 
I and II 

These courses offer a survey of the 
fundamental principles of chemistry 
and the study of recent develop- 
ments. It emphasizes structures of 
chemical species, particularly the re- 
lationships of these structures to the 
chemical and physical properties of 
substances. 
3 semester hours each 

Fall and Spring Semesters 



Science 77 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS/EARTH SCIENCE 



83:A100 



Introduction to Physical 
Science 



This course deals with basic scientific dis- 
coveries which have created present-day 
activities in the fields of astronomy, atomic 
energy and meteorology. The social eco- 
nomic, and educational consequences of 
these discoveries and the industries grow- 
ing out of them are treated in such detail 
as to be of service to prospective teachers 
of social studies, English, languages, and 
other subjects. 
4 semester hours Fall Semester 

84:A100 Fundamentals of Earth 
Sciences (80 : lOOC) 

Land forms and water bodies are treated 
from the standpoint of origin and evolu- 
tion, and, together with the atmosphere, 
are considered in relation to their influence 
upon life and activities. Tlie laboratory 
work consists of the study of topographic 
maps, models and other methods of il- 
lustration. 

Required field trips to areas of interest. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

84: A 101 Principles of Geology (84:100) 

A study of the geologic materials and proc- 
esses and the internal structure of the earth. 
The earth and its geographic, stratigraphic, 
and structural development throughout 
geologic time; the record of the evolution 
of life as interpreted through a study of 
rocks and fossils. Required field trips to 
areas of geologic interest. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



84:A120 Descriptive Astronomy 

This course in descriptive astronomy is de- 
signed for the general student. Acquisition 
of a working knowledge and appreciation 
of the tool of the astronomer; the nature 
of the solar system ; location of points of 
the celestial sphere; motions and laws 
relative to systems; the nature, classifica- 
tion and magnitudes of stars; and cos- 
mogony, are course objectives. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

84:A512 Paleoecology 

The principles of paleoecology with em- 
phasis on the study of the distribution 
and association of fossils as interpreted 
from the evidence presented in the geo- 
logic record. Detailed paleoecological field 
study made of Devonian bioherm. 
Prerequisite: 84:104 or the permission 
of the instructor. 
Formerly 84:312. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

84:A540 Geochemistry 

Chemical laws and principles applied to 
the Earth: its chemical composition, dis- 
tribution of the elements, relative abun- 
dance of the elements, and the use of 
isotopes in prospecting, paleontology, 
mineralogy, determining absolute age, and 
physical geology. Also, study of meteor- 
ites will be included. Field trips will be 
required. 
Prequisites: General Chemistry or Petrol 

ogy. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES 



90:A401 The Teaching of the Social 
Studies in Secondary Schools 

The course persents recent tendencies in 
educational method in teaching the social 
studies. A program is presented containing 
the correlation of subject-matter organiza- 
tion in socialized recitation, the teaching of 
current events, projects in citizenship, and 
the use of the project-problem as a method 
of teaching history and civics. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

78 Physics/Earth Science/Social Science 



90:A410 The Newspaper in the 
Classroom 

This course presents new and standarc 
techniques in the use of the newspaper ii 
the English and Social Studies classes i» 
the secondary school. 
By invitation only. Passaic Herald New 
— sponsor. 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semester 



9O:A603 



Social Studies Research 
Seminar 



This seminar course is designed primarily 
to provide an opportunity for graduate 
students in the social sciences to investi- 
gate and apply the techniques of research 
in the social studies field. 



Students who plan to take the Comprehen- 
sive Examination must register for the 
Seminar in the semester preceding the Ex- 
amination date. 

Registration Examination 

Fall March 

Spring October 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 



91 :A200 Cultural Anthropology 

This general introduction to cultural an- 
thropology emphasizes the basic method- 
ologies, concepts, applications, and goals. 
The nature of culture, the role of culture 
in human experience, and the universality 
of human needs and aspirations are demon- 
strated through the analysis of transcultural 
data. 

5 semester hours Spring Semester 



91:A46l Ethnohistory : Interdisciplinary 
Approaches 

This interdisciplinary course introduces 
. students to the aims, methods and techni- 
ques of ethnohistorical research. Emphasiz- 
ing the intersection of anthropology and 
history, sources of data include both doc- 
i umentary and nondocumentary (e.g. 
I "folk" history, oral tradition, etc.) evi- 
j dence in reconstructing the culture history 
of nonliterate of semi-literate societies. 
Special attention is given to the Mediter- 
ranean region with a focus on the Gypsy 
culture and to South Asia with the focus 
on the Hindu culture. Guest lectures by 
cultural geographers are included. 

Prerequisite: 91:200 and 94:200. Also 
listed as 94:461. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



91:A532 Applied Anthropology 

This course considers the selection and ap- 
plication of anthropological data for deal- 
ing with problems of contemporary life. 
Emphasis is placed on anthropological 
knowledge in the professions. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

91:A535 Ethnology I 

An introduction to anthropology as a 
field of knowledge: the background and 
development of culture; culture theory; 
the universals of culture, e.g., religion, 
art, leisure, education; the relationship of 
anthropology to science and the humani- 
ties. Not open to students who have com- 
pleted 91:200 Cultural Anthropology. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

91:A537 Cultural Dynamics 

Emphasis in this graduate course is placed 
on the dynamics of cultural preservation, 
transmission, and change. Factors and 
conditions which retard and stimulate 
culture change are considered in transcul- 
tural perspective. A unit of study is de- 
voted to the psychocultural consequences 
of rapid change. 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in 
cultural anthropology. 

Not open to students who have completed 
91 :402. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Social Science/ Anthropology 79 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 



92 :A200 Introduction to Economics 

This course is designed to provide an un- 
derstanding of major objectives and fea- 
tures of the American economy. Topics 
include operations of a market economy, 
structure and function of business, labor 
and management relations, money and 
banking, government and business relations, 
and international economics. Analysis is 
made of the objectives of economic growth 
and stability. 
5 semester hours Spring Semester 

92:A542 Economic Stability and Growth 

The objectives of this course are: (1) to 
study the determinants of stability and 
growth; (2) to analyze policies available 
to develop and developing nations that 



deal with instability and stagnation; (3) 
to foster an understanding of the basic 
issues involved in efforts to avoid in- 
security and promote economic growth. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

92 : A 54 5 Economics of Labor and 
Manpower 

This course will evaluate principle trends 
in labor-management relations in both the 
private and public sectors of the economy. 
Among the current problems to be ex- 
amined will be: employment theory, 
economics of poverty, manpower policies, 
and collective bargaining in the private 
and public sectors of the economy. 
Formerly: 92:401 Labor Economics. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 



93:A200 Cultural Geography 

This course examines the traits that give 
groups their distinctive character and that 
condition the manner in which each group 
perceives and uses its habitat. Emphasis is 
placed on the socio-cultural diversity of 
mankind and on the spatial aspects of race, 
language, religion and nations as categories 
of thought patterns and institutions that 
unite or separate human groups. 
5 semester hours Spring Semester 

93 : A302 Economic Geography 

Emphasizing the development of agricul- 
tural and industrial societies, this course 
is designed to introduce students to the 
basic principles of economic geography. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

9 3 : A4 1 Urban Geography 

This course is a study of the growth, mor- 
phology, and function of cities. Attention 
will be given to the complex, dynamic 
forces which influence spatial patterns and 
functional changes within urban areas. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



93:A4l2 The Geography of Africa 

This course includes a topical and regional 
study of Africa. Emphasis is placed upon 
the problems of economic adjustment in 
the tropics. Soils, vegetation, climate, phys- 
iography, natural resources and other as- 
pects of the physical environment are 
examined in the light of man's habitation 
of the continent. Relations between Africa 
and the rest of the world are analyzed. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



93 : A422 Population and Settlement 
Patterns in Africa 

This course examines the distribution, 
composition and size characteristics of the 
population of Africa south of the Sahara. 
Contemporary distributional patterns are 
stressed, especially migration, population 
pressure, and growth. Relationships be- 
tween man and the environment are re- 
vealed as crucial factors. 



3 semester hours 



Fall Semester 



80 Economics/Geography 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 



94: A 103 The Development of Early 
Western Civilization 

A survey of the Western civilizations from 
earliest times with particular reference to 
the growth, development and interactions 
of cultural, political, economic, social and 
religious institutions. Emphasis is placed 
on the significance of dominant and dis- 
tinguishable characteristics through which 
civilizations may be recognized as distinct 
cultural and social entities. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



94: A 108 The Development of African 
Civilization 

This course offers a survey of pre-colonial 
African civilization and its eclipse under 
slavery and the colonial onslaught. The 
principal social, political and environmental 
systems of the periods will be covered. 
Major artistic forms, including dance, art 
and architecture, will be drawn upon to 
illustrate the unique aspects of African 
traditional culture. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



94:AllO The Development of American 
Civilization 

This course offers the student the oppor- 
tunity to identify and examine the main- 
streams of development in American 
civilization. Attention is directed to the 
political, intellectual, social, economic and 
cultural forces and achievements in our 
past which have made the United States 
distinctive. Major emphasis is placed upon 
the values which have underlaid the estab- 
lishment and growth of American institu- 
tions and upon the character of those 
institutions formal and informal. The roles 
of outstanding individuals are constantly 
emphasized. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



94 : A 1 1 1 Selected Topics in American 
History to 1876 

In place of the general survey, this course 
examines the development of the American 
Nation from the period of discovery and 
exploration to the Civil War and Recon- 



struction through a study of specific issues 
and problems. The main streams of early 
American thought, the development of an 
American society, the establishment of our 
constitutional authority and the contribu- 
tions and challenges of the various sections 
are analyzed and interpreted. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



94:All2 Selected Topics in American 
History since 1876 

Continues the approach of the earlier course. 
Examines the development of the American 
Nation since the Civil War. Special atten- 
tion is given to the growth of American 
thought, the transition from an agrarian to 
an industrial society and the role of the 
United States as a world power. National 
responses to our economic, social and polit- 
ical development are considered. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94:All8 The Development of Classical 
Civilization 

A study of the history and development of 
the Mediterranean-based civilizations of 
Greece and Rome with emphasis on those 
elements of the classical civilizations which 
influenced the subsequent histories of the 
European peoples. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94: A 122 Nineteenth Century Europe, 
1815-1914 

A study of the history of Europe since the 
Congress of Vienna: the rise of national- 
ism, liberalism, socialism and democracy: 
the Industrial Revolution: unification of 
Italy and Germany; imperialism and fac- 
tors leading to World War I. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94:A123 



Contemporary Europe, 1914 to 
the Present 



This course surveys the history of Europe 
from World War I to the present. Major 
topics include the Paris Peace Conference, 
1919: Revolution of 1917 and develop- 
ment of Communism in Russia; failure of 
the western democracies and rise of Fascism 



History 81 



in Germany,- Italy and Spain; origins of 
World War II; post- 1945 settlement and 
establishment of Communism in eastern 
Europe; and movement towards economic 
and political integration of western Euro- 
pean states. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

94 : A2 1 1 The United States Since World 
War I 

This course surveys the major problems, 
economic, social, political and inter- 
national, which have marked our national 
development since the end of the first 
World War. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

94: A3 17 Black History 

This course is designed to give students an 
opportunity to study the role played by 
Americans of African descent in the de- 
velopment of the United States. Set within 
the framework of American history, it 
focuses on the contribution of black 
Americans in the various epochs of our 
history from initial discovery and explora- 
tion by Europeans to the revolutionary 
confrontations to the mid- 20th century. 
Formerly: 94:417 Negro in American 
History. 
5 semester hours Spring Semester 

94 : A322 History of the Middle Ages 

This course examines the origins and devel- 
opment of Medieval civilizations in 
Western Europe from the decline of Rome 
to about 13 50. Study is made of the 
conversion of Europe to Christianity, 
monasticism, feudalism and manorialism, 
the development of towns and trade, a 
powerful Church, dynastic monarchies, 
universities, art. literature and philosophy. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

94:A4l2 American Historiography 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize 
the student with the writings and sources 
of United States history. Social, economic, 
political, geographic and other interpreta- 
tions are studied and compared. Writings 
of a group of representative American 
historians are examined. A general survey 
and evaluation are made of the primary 
and secondary sources available for the 
study of United States history. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



94:A421 Renaissance and Reformation 

A study of political, economic, social, re- 
ligious, and general cultural developments 
in Europe from about 1400 to 1600. 
Basic interpretations of the Renaissance 
and Reformation are examined and dis- 
cussed. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94:A435 The Emergence of Modern 
America, 1820-1876 

A study of the significant events and de- 
velopments of the period: Jacksonian 
democracy ; westward expansion and sec- 
tionalism ; the Civil War and Reconstruc- 
tion. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



94:A436 



America in Transition, 
1865-1917 



A study of the forces which contributed to 
the development of modern, industrial 
America; American society and its reac- 
tions to the changes of the period. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94:A511 Origins of American 

Civilization, 1607-1763 

This course will examine the forces and 
conditions of the colonial period which 
contributed to the shaping of the character- 
istics of American political and economic 
institutions, social practices and ideals, 
intellectual outlooks, and attitudes toward 
Europe. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94 : A 5 1 7 The New Deal Era 

This course is designed to give students an 
opportunity to study that part of recent 
American history which centers about the 
life of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The 
events of 1933-45 represent a culmination 
of a whole generation's ideas, aspirations 
and experiences. While concentrating on the 
domestic aspects of American life, some 
attention is given to foreign affairs and 
their impact on the daily lives of Ameri- 
cans. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



82 History 



94:A519 The United States in the 
Nuclear Age 

This course is designed to give students an 
opportunity to study that part of recent 
American history which centers about the 
role played by the United States in world 
affairs in the period from 1939 to the 
present. America's leadership role resulted 
from a decade of peripheral involvement 
while professing isolation. The course con- 
centrates on the international aspects of 
American life, but the impact of domestic 
affairs on our foreign policy throughout 
the period is not neglected. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

94:A520 U. S. — Far Eastern Relations 

This diplomatic history course focuses on 
topics in United States relations with 
China and Japan, 1842 to the present. 
Particular attention is given to the men 
who formulated an implemented U.S. 
policy. An attempt is made to evaluate 
U.S. national interests and the policies 
which were meant to serve them. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

94:A529 Europe of the Dictators, 
1919-1939 

A study of political, social, economic and 



intellectual developments in the major 
states of western Hurope during the years 
1919-19 39, with emphasis on varieties 
of fascism of the interwar period. The 
diplomatic origins of World War II are 
also investigated. 
3 semester hours f all Semester 



94:A53I Modern East Asian History 

A survey of the history of China and 
Japan from 1600 to the present, this 
course utilizes philosophical and bio- 
graphical works in conjunction with an- 
thropological and historical studies in 
order to determine the nature of the modi- 
fication in traditional values which fol- 
lowed the impact of the West on Asia. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94:A534 France of the Republics 

This course studies the development of 

modern France from 1870 to the present. 

Emphasis is placed upon political, social. 

and economic conditions and trends 

through the Third, Fourth and Fifth 

Republics. 

Formerly 94:523 Modern France 

5 semester hours Spring Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



95:A200 



Introduction to Political 
Science 



A study of government and politics in the 
contemporary world with particular refer- 
ence to American institutions. Considera- 
tion will be given to the organization and 
functions of national and international 
governments. Conflicting ideologies will be 
examined. 

5 semester hours Fall Semester 



95:A401 Constitutional Law 

A study of the development of the Con- 
stitution and the Supreme Court of the 
United States illustrated through reference 



to court opinions as expressed in selected 

Supreme Court cases. 

Prerequisite: 95 :102. 103. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

95:A406 Governments and Politics of 
the Middle East 

Starting with a consideration of the factors 
and forces that have shaped Middle Eastern 
civilization, the course goes on to consider 
the particular influences operating in the 
individual countries of the region. The 
nature of Islam is discussed along with the 
elements making for change such as tech- 
nology, the military, conflicting nation- 
alisms. Many of the countries of South- 
west Asia and North Africa are considered. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



History/Political Science 83 



95:A407 



The Government and Politics 
of the U.S.S.R. 



A general analysis of the governmental 
structure of the Soviet Union. Emphasis is 
on the evolution of foreign policy and 
ideology since the Bolshevik revolution, 
but attention is given to various institu- 
tional and group arrangements in contem- 
porary Russia. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



95:A408 



Political Thought Through 
the French Revolution 



This course is designed to survey and 
analyze a select group of political philoso- 
phers and their contributions to the basic 
theories of Western political thought from 
the Greeks to Waterloo. Among those 
discussed will be: Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, 
Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Luther, 
Calvin, Bodin, Hobbes, Locke, Montes- 
quieu, Hume and Rousseau. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 



95 :A512 Origin and Development of 
the Constitution, 1619-1835 

This course is an intensive study of the 
origin and framing of the Constitution of 
the United States. It aims to search out the 
roots and influences that determined our 
basic political institutions. The seminar 
method is employed and attention is given 
to the techniques of historical research and 
writing as it applies to the early period 
in American history. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



95:A522 



Great Britain and the 
Commonwealth 



A study is made of the origins, member- 
ship, and working institutions of the 
British Commonwealth of Nations. Special 
attention is given to problems of the 
Commonwealth since 1945, in the light 
of Britain's altered position in inter- 
national affairs and the development in 
Europe of regional economic organizations. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

96: Am Race and Ethnic Relations 96:A562 Social Change 



A survey of the social meaning of race 
and ethnicity and their impact on con- 
temporary American society. A discussion 
of the development of the meaning and 
significance of racial differences and their 
perpetuation through certain invidious 
labels such as "minority" and "disad- 
vantaged" in reference to social groups. 
Prejudice and discrimination as products 
of one's social environment are also 
stressed. Emphasis is placed on socially de- 
fined American racial minority groups. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



96:Al 12 Sociology of Leisure 

Topics discussed are leisure as a social 
problem, automation and leisure, and the 
use of leisure time in modern society. 



3 semester hours 



Spring Semester 



The focus of this course is on the dynamics 
of contemporary societies. Topics include 
sacred and secular movements, technologi- 
cal, and cultural change, protest and 
revolution, and Twentieth Century na- 
tionalism. The effects of change are con- 
sidered in relation to individuals, groups, 
institutions, and total societies. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

96:A565 /Sociology of Youth 

The couj/se examines socialization processes 
acting ^pon young people; the role of 
family, neighborhood, school and com- 
munity; the effects of failures in these 
socializing agencies; changing relations 
among age grades; and quantitative studies 
of the culture of youth with comparisons 
to other age grades. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



84 Political Science/Sociology 



96:A566 The Metropolitan Community 

An examination of the many dimensions 
that make up the metropolitan community. 
The course will include a consideration of 
the human factors involved, the problems 
an area faces, the political difficulties en- 
countered, and the interrelationship and 
interaction between the center city and the 
other component parts of the metropolitan 
community. Primary emphasis will be 
upon the New York-New Jersey metro- 
politan community. 
5 semester hours Fall Semester 

96:A572 Selected Problems in 
Sociology 

The seminar will be devoted to the inten- 
sive exploration of a general problem in 
Sociology. Participants will be expected 



to contribute to the seminar in the form 
of research into an aspect of the problem 
which is of interest to them. The seminar 
will be formed either at the initiative of 
a member of the Department, or in 
response to the interests of a group of 
students, upon consent of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



96:A574 Sociology of Cultural and 
Ethnic Groups 

A study of the major cultural and ethnic 
groups in American society, with particu- 
lar attention to relationships among groups 
and the significance of these relationships 
to the structure of society. The student 
will be asked to prepare an indepth report 
of the group of his choice. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY 
AND AUDIOLOGY 



97:A531 Advanced Audiology 

The purpose of this course is to increase 
skill in administering tests for determining 
pure-tone and speech reception thresholds. 
Emphasis is placed on evaluation and in- 
terpretation of test results and on the 
analysis of client histories. Principles and 
techniques of hearing aid evaluation, 
measurement or recruitment, and tests for 
psychogenic deafness and malingering are 
studied. Consideration is also given to pre- 
and post-surgical audiometry, and to the 
special problems of differential diagnosis 
in testing children. 

Prerequisite: 60 clinical hours in speech 
practicum. 
5 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A533 Supervision of Speech and 
Hearing Programs 

Methods of organization and administra- 
tion of the speech correction and improve- 
ment programs are discussed. Emphasis is 
placed upon problems of screening, re- 
ferral, speech-staff training and orientation, 
in-service courses, parent and community 
relations, integration with other disciplines, 
and development of new materials for test- 
ing, teaching and evaluating. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



97:A539 Voice Disorders 

The purpose of this course is to study 
selected disorders of voice production. Con- 
sideration is given to etiology, pathology, 
and therapy related to vocal nodules, con- 
tact ulcers, paralysis of the vocal cords, 
and other organic voice problems. Speech 
rehabilitation techniques for the laryn- 
gectomized and for persons with cleft 
palate conditions are also discussed. 
Prerequisite: 97 :439B and C or consent 
of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



97:A570 Teaching Speech to the 
Hard of Hearing 

Methods and materials of teaching speech 
to children with severe hearing impairment. 
Techniques of auditory training, amplifi- 
cation, and the use of group hearing aids 
are included. 



2 semester hours 



Spring Semester 



97:A58lA Diagnosis and Correction 
of Children with Learning 
Disabilities 

TTieory and methodology. Study of the 
causes and effects of neurological impair- 



Sociology/Speech Pathology 85 



ment in school age children. Emphasis will 
be on methods effective in helping children 
whose perceptual dysfunctioning interferes 
with development of communication and 
learning. Demonstrations with learning 
disabilities children will serve as the basis 
for study and discussion. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



97:A58lB Methods and Materials in 
Teaching Children with 
Learning Disabilities 

Demonstration and practice teaching. Stu- 
dent teaching, under supervision of groups 
of children who have learning disabilities. 
Discussion and evaluation will follow each 
lesson. Parents of the children will take 
part in the conferences with the teachers. 



(Credit for whole course dependent upon 

completion of part B.) 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A583 Teaching Speech to 

Language Impaired Children 

The nature and needs in helping language 
impaired children to develop concepts for 
expressing thought and needs arc pre- 
sented. Special emphasis is placed on men- 
tally retarded children. There will be 
demonstrations with trainable and edu- 
cable children, aphasic children and schizo- 
phrenic children. In addition, methods, 
materials, and programs for teaching child- 
ren with language impairments will be 
supervised and evaluated in a clinical prac- 
ticum on campus. 
Formerly: 97:483A and B. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



FIELD STUDIES 



99:A467 Florida 

This is a field-study course covering the 
Florida peninsula including both coasts, 
the Everglades, and the Lake Region. 
Among the places visited are ancient St. 
Augustine; the winter playgrounds at 
Palm Beach and Miami; the Tamiami 
Trail through the Everglades; the west 
coast cities of Sarasota, St. Petersburg, and 
Tampa; and the Lake Region in the 
neighborhood of the Lake Wales and Or- 
lando. The trip affords the opportunity 
for topographical, historical, and industrial 
studies. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 



99 : A406 Puerto Rico and the Virgin 
Islands 

This is a nine-day field-study course de- 
voted to a survey of our nearest island 
possessions. It includes an exploration of 
San Juan and its vicinity, including the 
University and the rain forest, a two-day 
trip through the island visiting pineapple, 



coffee, sugar, and textile, and rum-pro- 
ducing areas, churches, homes, and his- 
toric places. One day is spent in St. 
Thomas, largest of the Virgin Islands. 
The trip to and from the islands is made 
by air. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



99 : S42 3 The British Isles 

This is a comprehensive overview of the 
British Isles, spending about a week each 
in England, Scotland, and Ireland and a 
day in Wales. Geographic, Historical and 
literary places of interest will be visited 
including Cambridge, Oxford, London, 
York, Windermere, Hampton Court, 
Windsor Castle, Salisbury, Stonehenge, 
Stratford-on-Avon, and many other places 
in England; Edinburgh, Glasgow, and the 
Loch district in Scotland; Caernarvan and 
Bettws-y-Coed in Wales; Dublin, Cork, 
Killarney, Limerick, and Shannon in 
Ireland. 



3 semester hours 



Summer 1971 



Inquiries regarding these tours should be addressed to the Office of International 
and Off-Campus Learning Programs. 



86 Speech Pathology/Field Studies 



COURSE REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER, 1970 

For graduate classes, departments have the option of meeting 3 s.h. for two or 
three contact hours with extended assignments when meeting the shorter time. 

Some departments have not established ending times for their classes. Students 
should anticipate a maximum of 50 minutes per semester hour on non-laboratory 
classes in estimating the ending hour. 

Use the information below for completing the registration form. Refer to course 
descriptions and full titles under Course Offerings, beginning on page 36 
Building codes may be found on page 34. 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



)01 


10 Aid 


302 


10 A201 


303 


10 A401 


)04 


10 A405 


)05 


10 A434 


)06 


10 A470 


)07 


10 A501 


)08 


10 A512 


)09 


10 A603 


)10 


11 A208 


)11 


11 A551 


)12 


11 A553 


)13 


15 A404 


)14 


15 A408 


)15 


15 A420 


116 


15 A423 


•17 


15 A424 


118 


15 A424 


•19 


15 A436 


120 


15 A451 


'21 


15 A461 


'22 


15 A501 


23 


15 A503 


,24 


15 A503 


25 


15 A503 


26 


15 A503 


27 


15 A503 


28 


15 A504 


29 


15 A505 


30 


15 A507 


31 


15 A509 


32 


15 A510 


33 


15 A510 



BusOrg&Mngment 3 

Accounting I 3 

Prin&MethTchgGenBus . . 2 

BusEconomics 3 

IntroBusDataProc 3 

BusEdTchrsDisadv 2 

Prin&ProbBusEd 2 

ImprlnstGenBusSubj .... 2 

ResSemBusEd 2 



Staff M&W 

Staff M&W 

Mr. Hand ... Tues 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Wed 

Staff Tues 

Dr. Nanassy . . , Tues 
Dr. Nanassy . . . Thurs 
Dr. Froehlich . Mon 



6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

5:00-6:40 

6:30-7:45 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 



DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

Salesmanship 3 Staff Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 



ImprlnstrDistEd 2 

TrendsRetailDist 2 



Dr. Hecht Wed 5:00-6:40 

Dr. Hecht Wed 7:30-9:10 



C-316 
C-316 
C-316 
C-310 
B-003 
C-117 
C-316 
C-316 
C-310 



C-310 
C-310 
C-310 



EDUCATION 

SupvTchgSem 4 

Sel&UtilA-VMats 3 

Instrlnnovations 3 

TchgUrbanSchools 3 

1 Tchr,School&Soc 3 

2 Tchr,School&Soc 3 

Curr&MethSexEd 3 

GuidClrmTchr 3 

JrHighSchCurr 3 

Tests&MeasEd 2 

1 MethOfResearch 3 

2 MethOfResearch 3 

3 MethOfResearch 3 

4 MethOfResearch 3 

5 MethOfResearch 3 

ActResrchTchrs 3 

TwoYrJrColiege 3 

Measmnt&Eval I 3 

MedProbEduc 3 

1 EducAdmin I 3 

2 EducAdmin I 3 



Staff 


. . Tues 


7:30 


G-210 


Staff 


. . Wed 


7:30 


C-304 


Miss Baker & 








Mr. Tetens . . 


. . Mon 


7:30 


C-228 


Mr. Millard . 


. Wed 


7:30 


F-104 


Staff 


. Mon 


7:30 


F-104 


Staff 


. . Thurs 


7:30 


G-207 


Dr. Runden . 


. . Mon 


7:30 


G-210 


Mrs. Gaeng 


. Tues 


7:30 


H-004 


Mr. Cuff 


. . Tues 


5:00 


G-206 


Dr. Lang . . . 


..Sat 


8:30 a.m. 


H-003 


Staff 


. .Mon 


7:30 


H-003 


Staff 


. . Tues 


7:30 


H-003 


Dr. Heiss . . . 


. .Wed 


5:00 


H-003 


Dr. Heiss . . 


. . Thurs 


5:00 


H-003 


Dr. Lang . . . 


. Sat 


10:30 a.m. 


H-003 


Staff 


. . Mon 


7:30 


H-004 


Dr. Merlo . . . 


. Mon 


7:30 


S-102 


Dr. Lang . . . 


. .Tues 


5:00 


H-003 


Dr. Williams 


. Thurs 


5:00 


F-104 


Dr. Mosier . . 


. . Mon 


5:00 


G-206 


Dr. Ambry . . 


. Thurs 


7:30 


G-109 



Course Schedules — Fall Semester 87 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



034 15 


A514 




035 15 


A520 


1 


036 15 


A520 


2 


037 15 


A525 




038 15 


A530 


1 


039 15 A530 


2 


040 15 


A532 


1 


041 15 


A532 


2 


042 15 


A533 




043 15 


A535 




044 15 


A540 


1 


045 15 A540 


2 


046 15 


A545 




047 15 


A547 




048 15 


A549 




049 15 


A550 




050 15 


A552 




051 15 A554 




052 15 


A556 




053 15 


A558 




054 15 


A564 


1 


055 15 


A564 


2 


056 15 


A566 




057 15 A568 




058 15 


A571 




059 15 


A578 




060 15 


A580 


1 


061 15 


A580 


2 


062 15 


A580 


3 


063 15 


A582 


1 


064 15 


A582 


2 


065 15 


A583 




066 15 


A585 


1 


067 15 


A585 


2 


068 15 


A587 




069 15 


A601E 




070 15 


A604 




071 15 


A607 




072 15 


A610 




073 15 A619 




074 15 


A628 




075 15 A650 




076 15 


A659 





School Law 3 

SecSchAdmin 3 

SecSchAdmin 3 

SchPlantPlanning 3 

CurrConstrSecSch 3 

CurrConstxSecSch 3 

PrinCurrDev 3 

PrinCurrDev 3 

EdThot20thCent 3 

TchgComm Skills 3 

Supervision 1 3 

Supervision I 3 

SocForcesEduc 3 

ExistentialismEd 3 

CompStudEdSystems .... 3 

LitForAdolescents 2 

NatureOfReading 3 

CaseStudReadDiff I 3 

Corr&RemRead I 3 

FieldExperRead 2 

DynamicsGroupProc .... 3 

DynamicsGroupProc .... 3 

TVProdSeminar 3 

ProdA-VMats I:N-Pro ... 3 

EnvironmntlEduc 3 

Test&EvalStPerSer 3 

PrinGuid&Couns 3 

PrinGuid&Couns 3 

PrinGuid&Couns 3 

VocGuid&OccInf 3 

VocGuid&OccInf 3 

EdGuidance 3 

GrGuid&CounAct 3 

GrGuid&CounAct 3 

Ad&SupvGuidProgs 3 

WkspEd:Psy-SexEd 3 

FldWrk&PractGuid 3 

FldWrk&PractSocWrk ... 3 

PersServTeam 3 

SemAdm:Supv&Curr .... 2 

FldExpAdm&Supv 2 

ResSem&ThesisWrit .... 3 

ResSemReading 2 



Dr. Merlo 


.Wed 


7:30 


Dr. Peckham . 


Mon 


5:00 


Dr Bellagamba 


.Tues 


5:00 


Dr. Merlo .... 


Mon 


5:00 


Staflf 


Wed 


7:30 


Staflf 


Thurs 


5:00 


Staff 


Tues 


7:30 


Staff 


■ Thurs 


7:30 


Mrs. Danzig . . 


Mon 


5:00 


Mr. Donaruma 


Mon 


7:30 


Mr. Cuff 


Mon 


7:30 


Staff 


Tues 


7:30 


Mrs. Bredemeier Tues 


5:00 


Dr. Haas .... 


Thurs 


7:30 


Mr. Bernstein . 


Thurs 


5:00 


Miss Schantz . 


Tues 


7:30 


Mr. Brunner 


Tues 


5:00 


Mrs. Ward . . . 


Thurs 


7:30 


Miss Schantz 


. Thurs 


4:00-6:30 


Mrs. Ward . . . 


. To Be Arranged 


Dr. Gregg . . . 


. Mon 


5:00 


Dr. Gorman . . 


Wed 


7:30 


Mr. Diglio & 






Miss Fantone . 


• Wed 


5:00 


Mr. Ruezinsky 


Thurs 


7:30 


Dr. Ambry . . 


Tues 


7:30 


Dr. Gelfond . . 


.Wed 


7:30 


Staff 


Mon 


5:00 


Dr. Gregg . . . 


Wed 


5:00 


Staff 


Thurs 


7:30 


Dr. Kenyon . 


Mon 


7:30 


Dr. Gelfond . 


Wed 


5:00 


Staff 


Tues 


5:00 


Mr. Mills . . . 


Tues 


7:30 


Mr. Mills . . . 


. Thurs 


5:00 


Staff 


Tues 


5:00 


Dr. Runden . 


Wed 


7:30 


Dr. Gelfond & 






Dr. Gregg 


. Thurs 


5:00 


Dr. Williams 


Mon 


5:00 


Dr. Davis ... 


Tues 


7:30 


Dr. Peckham 


Tues 


5:00 


Dr. Peckham 


. To Be Arranged 


Dr. Davis . . . 


.Wed 


5:00 


Mr. Brunner . . 


Wed 


5:00 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



077 20 A105 


1 


Comp&Literature I ... 


. . 3 


078 20 A105 


2 


Comp&Literature I . . . 


. . 3 


079 20 A105 


3 


Comp&Literature I . . . 


.. 3 


080 20 A106 


1 


Comp&Literature II 


.. 3 


081 20 A106 


2 


Comp&Literature II . . 


. . 3 


082 20 A252 




ContDr:And-Pres 


. . 2 


88 Course Schedu 


les — Fall Semester 





Staff M&W 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Mr. Johnston . M&W 



6 


30-7:45 


G-2 


8 


00-9:15 


G-1 


8 


00-9:15 


A-li 


6 


30-7:45 


G-1 


8 


00-9:15 


G-1 


8 


00-8:50 


G-1 



^as. Oept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



A262 ModEuropNovel 3 Staff 

A341 ArtOf Poetry 3 Dr. McGee 

A362 AmerFictTol900 3 Mr. Paul . 

A500 GreekDrama 3 Dr. Earley 

A512 EnglishLanguage 3 Mr. Reaske . 

A515 ModernAmerCrit 3 Dr. Healey . 

A519A Myth:Orig&Dev 3 Mrs. Barrett 

A531B HrhCentProse 3 Dr. Schwegel 

A535A Defoe.Pope.Swift 3 Dr. Radner 

A603 EngResrchWritng 3 Mr. Roberts 



. Tu&Th 
Tu&Th 
M&W 
Mon 
Wed 
Thurs 
Mon 
Wed 
Mon 
Thurs 



8:00-9 

6:30-7 

6:30-7 

5:00-7 

5:00 

5:00 

5:00 

7:30 

7:30 

7:30 



G-118 
G-115 
G-118 
L-135 
G-109 
G-109 
G-110 
G-206 
G-206 
G-206 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND THEATER 



A 100 1 FundamentalsSpeech . . 3 

A 100 2 FundamentalsSpeech .... 3 

A106 OrallntrpLit 3 

A440 ThtrHstry:Clss-Elz 2 

A490 GrpDisc&Leadsp 3 

A567X SemDramProd 3 



DEPARTMENT OF 

IntroVisualArts 3 

Multi-Media 2 

MstrpcsWrldArt 3 

LifeDrawing 2 

TchgArtHstryK-12 3 

CurrCnstrArtEd 2 

Painting 2 

Sculpture 2 

Mtlwrk&Jwlry 2 

Ceramics :Pot&Scul 2 

IntaglioPrinting 2 

SelProbArtHstry 3 

SeminarlnArt 2 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

12 26 A420 TchgFamLvngPubSchs 2 Mrs. Bernstein Tues 

13 26 427 ThelnnerCityFam 3 Dr. Sandford Tues 

14 26 A510 IntrdiscStudFam 2 Miss Guthrie Thurs 

^5 26 A560 ClthgHmnBehav 2 Mrs. Mukherjee Thurs 



99 24 


AlOO 


00 24 


A408A, 


B, 


C or D 


01 24 


A410 


02 24 A419A, 


B, 


C or D 


03 24 


A423 


04 24 


A502 


05 24 


A511A, 


B, 


C or D 


06 24 


A521A, 


B, 


C or D 


07 24 


A525A 


or 


B 


08 24 


A531A, 


B, 


C or D 


09 24 


A551A, 


B, 


C or D 


10 24 


A591 


11 24 


A603 



Staff 


M&W 


6:30-7:45 


A-101 


Staff 


. Tu&Th 


6:30-7:45 


A-101 


Staff 


.M&W 


8:00-9:15 


A-101 


Staff 


.Tues 


5:00-6:40 


A-102 


Mr. Moll , . 


Mon 


7:30-10:00 


A-104 


Mr. Sobolik . . 


.Wed 


7:30-10:00 


A-102 


FINE ARTS 








Mr. deLeeuw . 


Tues 


6:30-10:00 


L-229 


Mr. Kahn . . 


Thurs 


7:30-10:00 


L-135 


Dr. Kampf 


M&W 


6:30-7:45 


L-108 


Mr. Czerkowicz 


Tues 


7:30-10:00 


L-230 


Staff 


Thurs 


7:30 


L-209 


Mrs. Geiss . . 


Mon 


5:00-6:40 


L-209 


Staff 


Wed 


7:30-10:00 


L-225 


Mr. deLeeuw 


Mon 


5:00-7:20 


L-126 


Mr. Kyle . . 


Mon 


7:30-10:00 


L-126 


Mr. McCreath 


Tues 


5:00-7:20 


L-129 


Mr. Vernacchia 


Thurs 


5:00-7:20 


L-228 


Dr. Kampf 


Thurs 


^:30-10:00 


L-108 


Dr. Martens 


Wed 


5:00-6:40 


L-209 



30-9:10 
00-7:20 



F-104 
F-104 



00-6:40 F-106 
30-9:10 F-104 



Course Schedules — Fall Semester 89 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. ' No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION AND TECHNOLOGY 



116 


28 


A250 


117 


28 


A260 


118 


28 


A332 


119 28 A344 


120 


28 


A402 


121 


28 


A404A 




B 


or C 


122 


28 


A424 


123 


28 A496 


124 


28 


A501 


125 


28 


A507 


126 


28 


A601 


127 


28 A603 



Fndtnslnd-Plast 3 

Fndtnslnd-Metals 3 

ScrnProcReprod 3 

CabntConstr 3 

Curr&TchglndEd 3 

IndepStudInd 1-3 



Mr. Olsen Mon 

Staff Tues 

Mr. Atkins .... Tues 
Mr. Schumm . . Mon 
Mr. Olsen Thurs 



6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 



Staff To Be Arranged 



EngnrgGraphics 3 Mr. Goodall 

JwlryMkg&Lapdry 3 Mr. Dorner 

CurrConstrlndEd 3 Staff 

Prin&PhilV-TEd 2 Staff 

IndepStudIA 1-3 

ResSemlndArts 3 

(Meets for the entire academic year.) 



Wed 
Thurs 
Wed 
Mon 



6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 
7:30-9:10 



Staff To Be Arranged 

Dr. Earl Wed 5:00-6:40 



VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Mr. Van 

128 29 A451 VocGuidance 3 Benschoten Tues 5:00 

Mr. Van 

129 29 A471 V-TIn-SerSupvTchg 8 Benschoten .Tues 7:30 

(Meets for the entire academic year.) 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 



130 30 200 IntroSchLibServ 

131 30 403 RdgMatsChldrn&Yth . . 

132 30 404 Org&AdmSchLib 3 



2 


Miss Gibson 


. Thurs 


4:00-5:40 


4 


Miss Gibson 


.Mon& 


5:00-5:50 






TuWF 


5:00-5:50 


3 


Miss Gibson 


MWF 


4:00-4:50 



133 40 415 

134 40 408 



135 05 101 

136 40 422 



137 41 AlOOA 

138 41 A200A 

139 41 A200B 

140 41 A505 

141 41 A512 

142 41 A516 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS 

ClassicalMythology 2 Staff Thurs 5:00-6:40 G-2 

DevOfLatinLang 2 Dr. Kelly Tues 5:00-6:40 G-2 



DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 



Swahili I 3 

MthTchgForLngElSch ... 2 



Mr.Ngari M&W 

Mrs. Susi Mon 



5:00-6:30 
5:00-6:40 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 



Beginning French! 3 

IntermFrench I 3 

IntermFrench II 3 

HistryFrenchLang 2 

FrenchMedvlEpic 3 



Mr. Sergent . 


M&W 


8:00-9.15 


Mrs. Sergent 


. M&W 


8:00-915 


Mr. Stephen . 


. M&W 


6:30-745 


Mr. Hinshal- 






wood .... 


..Wed 


5:00-6:40 


Mr. Hinshal- 






wood .... 


.Wed 


7:30-9:10 



Rabelais&Montaigne 



90 Course Schedules — Fall Semester 



G-3 
G-3 



G-3 
G-3 
G-3 

G-3 

G-3 



3 Dr Applewhite Thurs 5:00-6:40 G-3 



Course 
No. 



Sect. 
No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 

Rm. 



AG 
46 
AG 



A 100 A 

AlOl 

A200A 



46 A516 
AG A541 

148 46 A551 

149 49 A 100 A 

150 49 A200A 



50 


AlOl 


50 


A105 


50 A403 


50 


A425X 


50 


A428X 


50 A431X 


50 


A461X 


50 


A525 


50 


A531 


50 


A543 


50 


A555 


50 


A564 


50 


A572 


50 


A590 



A461X 



166 


60 


AlOO 


167 


60 


160 


-68 


60 A409 


69 60 460 


70 60 


461 


.71 


60 463 


72 


60 


A503A 


J3 


60 


A503B 


:74 


60 


A504 


75 


60 


A506 


76 


60 


A519 


77 


60 A526 


178 


60 


A535 


|79 60 


A537 



80 63 A203 



DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGES 



BeginSpanish I 3 

SelRdgs:19-20Cent 3 

IntSpanish I 3 

SurMedvlSpLit 2 

SpAmerNovTol900 2 



Staff 


. Tu&Th 


6:30-7:45 


G-309 


Staff 


. M&W 


6:30-7:45 


G-309 


Staff 


, Tu&Th 


8:00-9:15 


G-309 


Dr. Barbeito 


. Tues 


5:00-6:40 


G-314 


Dr. Rivera- 








Rivera . . 


. Thurs 


5:00-6:40 


G-314 


Dr. Prieto . 


. . Mon 


5:00-6:40 


G-314 



ConSp-AmPoetry 2 

Beginltalian I 3 Mr. Battista . . . M&W 6:30-7:45 G-308 



Inrmltalian II 3 Mr. Battista 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



IntroModMath 2 

ElemStatRsng 2 

Tech&ApplStat 2 

AdvCalculus I 2 

IntroTopology 2 

FndtnsModAlgebra 2 

IntroCompSci 2 

Complex Var I 2 

AbstractAlge I 2 

MathStatistics I 2 

DiffGeometry 2 

OrdDiffEquats I 2 

TchgGenMath 2 

SemMathEd 2 

NSFIntroCompSci 2 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



M&W 8:00-9:15 G-308 



Mr. Scheitoin 


M&W 


6:30-7:20 


F-105 


Mr. Koegel . 


Tu&Th 


6:30-7:20 


F-105 


Mr. Koellner 


Tues 


5:00-6:40 


V-350 


Mr. Wolff . . 


Tues 


7:30-9:10 


V-161 


Dr. Parzynski 


Wed 


7:30-9:10 


V-163 


Mr. Garfunkel 


Tues 


5:00-6:40 


V-161 


Mr. Mutter . . 


Mon 


5:00-6:40 


V-161 


Mr. McConnell 


Mon 


7:30-9:10 


V-161 


Mr. Kalmansor 


Thurs 


5.00-6:40 


V-161 


Mr. Dick . 


Wed 


5:00-6:40 


V-161 


Mr. Stevens . 


Thurs 


7:30-9:10 


V-163 


Dr. Chai . 


Tues 


5:00-6:40 


V-163 


Dr. Sobel . . . 


Mon 


5:00-6:40 


V-154 


Mr. Garfunkel 


& 






Mr.Kollner . 


Tues 


7:30-9:10 


V-163 


Mr.Kollner . 


Sat 10:30 a.m.-12:10 V-154 



IntroMusic 2 

IntroMusTherapy 2 

DevOfOpera 2 

RecreationalMusic 2 

InfluMusOnBehav 3 

PsychFndtnsMusic I 2 

ApplMusI:PrimInstr .... 2 

ApplMusll:PrimInstr .... 2 

ApMusIII:PrimInstr .... 6 

ApMusV:PrimInstr 4 

KodalySysMusEd 2 

Jazz 2 

Band I 2 

Orchestra I 2 



Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Thurs 

Dr. Sacher . . . Thurs 

Staff Tues 

Staff Mon 

Staff Wed 

Staff To Be 

Staff To Be 

Staff To Be 

Staff To Be 

Dr. Engelhard Tues 
Dr. Oneglia Mon 

Mr. Shadel Tu&Th 

Dr. Oneglia M&W 



8:00-8:50 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-7:20 
5:00-6:40 
Arranged 
Arranged 
Arranged 
Arranged 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
4:00 
4:00 



M-015 
M-011 
M-015 
M-011 
M-OU 
M-011 



M-013 
M-015 
M-019 
M-019 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Ethics 3 Mr. Bridges Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 G-216 

Course Schedules — Fall Semester 91 



Mas. 


Dept 


. Course Sect 


No. 


No. 


No. ^No. 


181 


65 


AlOO 1 


182 65 


AlOO 2 


183 


65 


A201 


184 65 


A510 


185 


65 


A520 


186 


65 


A550 


187 


65 


A552 


188 


65 


A553 


189 65 


A560 1 


190 65 


A560 2 


191 


65 


A561 1 


192 


65 


A561 2 


193 


65 


A562 


194 65 


A564 


195 


65 


E564 


196 65 


A565 


197 


65 


A567 


198 


65 A573 


199 


65 


A574 


200 65 


A575 1 


201 


65 


A575 2 


202 


65 


A578 


203 


65 


A580 


204 65 


A581 


205 


65 


E592 


206 65 


A593 


207 


65 


A660 


208 


65 


A663 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

General Psychology 3 Staff 

General Psychology 3 Staff 

ChildPsychology 3 Staff 

ResMethPsych 3 Dr. Haupt . . 

Proseminar I 3 Dr. Brown & 

Dr. Seymour 

Quant&StatMeths 3 Dr. Rotter . . . 

GenSocialPsych 3 Dr. Worms . . 

UrbanPsychology 3 Dr. Williams . 

AdvEdPsychology 3 Mrs. Garland . 

AdvEdPsychology 3 Dr. Seymour 

DevPsychology 3 Dr. Koppel , . . 

DevPsychology 3 Dr. Duryea . . 

DynHumBehavior 3 Dr. Seymour . 

Psy&EdPhy&MntHdpChn . 3 Dr. Duryea . . . 

Psy&EdPhy&MntHdpChn . 3 Dr. Hauer . . 
(For Newark Fellowship students only.) 

Psy&EdSoc&EmtHdpChn 3 Mrs. Litovsky 

AbnormalPsych 3 Dr. Sugarman . 

PhysioPsych 3 Miss Garcia . . 

IndlntellTstg 3 Dr. Shapiro . . 

ProjTech I 3 Dr. Kraemer 

ProjTech I 3 Dr. Kraemer 

PsychTsts&Measmnts .... 3 Dr. Shapiro . 

Personality 3 Dr. Worms . 

Motivation 3 Staff 

SpecDiagTech 3 Dr. Shapiro 

(For Newark Fellowship students only.) 

Clinlntrvwng 3 Dr. Brower & 

Dr. Sugarman 

SemEdPsych 3 Dr. Duryea . . . 

IndependentStudy 1-3 Dr. Brower 



M&W 8 
Tu&Th 6 
Tu&Th 8 

Mon 7 



Tues 

Wed 

Wed 

Thurs 

Mon 

.Wed 
Tues 

. Thurs 
Wed 
Tues 
Fri 

Mon 
Tues 
. Thurs 
Mon 
Tues 
Thurs 
Tues 
Wed 
Thurs 
Fri 



00-9:15 G-30(| 

30-7:45 G-30(: 

00-9:15 G-30- 

30-10:00 G-20- 



G-21 
G-20' 
G-20 
G-20 
G-21 
G-31 
G-21 
G-21 
G-21 
G-20 



7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

To Be Arranged 

Jersey City State 

5:00-6:40 

1:00-2:40 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

9:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

To Be Arranged 

Jersey City State 



G-20 
H-01 
G-2C 
G-21 
E-15 
E-15 
G-3C 
G-11 
G-11 



Thurs 5:00-6:40 G-2(] 
Thurs 1:00-2:40 H-0: 
To Be Arranged 



PANZER SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HYGIENE 
HEALTH EDUCATION 



209 73 AlOO 

210 73 A408 

211 73 A413 

212 73 A414 

213 73 A516 

214 73 A525 

215 73 A603 



HealthfulLiving 



3 Staff Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 F-l< 



DriverEducation 3 Dr. Coder 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

DrugAbuseProb 2 Dr. Hoitsma 

WkspVenDisEduc 2 Dr. Redd . . 

Com&EnvAspctsHlth .... 3 Dr. Redd . . 

Hstry&FndtnsHlth 3 Dr. Hoitsma 

ResSemHlthEd 3 Dr. Hoitsma 

(Meets for the entire academic year.) 



Sat 

Mon 
Wed 
Mon 
Tues 
Thurs 



8:00-12noon C-1 



5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30 

7:30 

7:30 



P-0 
P-0 

G-2 
C-1 
G-2 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

216 76 A552 SemCurProbMenAthl .... 3 Staff Wed 7:30 G-2|| 

217 76 A554 OrntnSprtsMed 3 Dr. Horn Mon 7:30 P-OJ 

218 76 A5 7 5 Phil&SocFndnPE 3 Dr. Wacker ...Tues 7:30 P-Ol 

219 76 A579 AdvTst&MsrmntsPE 3 Staff Wed 7:30 P-Ci 

220 76 A603 ResSemPhyEd 3 Dr. Schleede ..Thurs 7:30 P- 

( Meets for the entire academic year.) 



92 Course Schedules — Fall Semester 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. Bldg. 

No. No. No. No. Title S.H. Instructor Day Time Rm. 

CiiNHKAL SCIHNCI- 

221 80 A410A IrHiSchSciDem I 2 Mr. Placek Tues 7:30-9:10 V-265 

222 80 A505 kesSemlnScience 2 Dr. Becker Fri 5:00-6:40 F-204 

(Meets alternate weeks and by appoinrment for the academic year.) 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOCY 

223 81 AlOO BiolSciences 4 Staff Tues& 6:30-7:45 F-209 

Thurs 6:30-10:00 

224 81 A512 GeneralEcology 4 Dr. Shubeck . . Sat 8:30 a.m.-l :30 V-353 

|225 81 A541 IntrmediaryMetab 3 Dr. Koditschek Wed 7:30-10:00 V-351 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

>26 82 A420 AdvInorganicChem 4 Staff Mon& 5:00-9:00 F-206 

Wed 5:00-6:40 

)^27 82 A530 QualOrganicAnal 4 Mr. Flynn Tues& 5:00-6:40 V-360 

Thurs 5:00-9:00 

i!28 82 A415 NSFModChemistry I . . 3 Dr. Wilson, Dr. Tues& 7:30-9:10 F-204 

Gawley, Mr. Thurs 
Zabady 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS/EARTH SCIENCE 

29 83 AlOO IntroPhySci 4 Mr. Hamdan Mon& 6:30-7:45 V-265 

Wed 6:30-10:00 V-265 

39 84 AlOO FundaEarthSci 3 Mr. Hamilton M&W 8:00-9:15 B-004 

31 84 A120 DescAstronomy 3 Dr. Kowalski Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 V-259 

32 84 A512 Paleoecology 3 Mr. Ramsdell Tues 7:30-10:00 B-004 



SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES 

33 90 A410 NewspaperClssrm 2 Dr. Cohen Tues 5:00-6:40 G-307 

(By invitation only.) 

34 90 A603 SocStudResSem 2 Staff Sat 10:30 a.m. C-228 
(For students who plan to take the Comprehensive Examination in March.) 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

i5 91 A532 ApplAnthropology 2 Staff Tues 7:30-9:10 S-102 

i6 91 A537 CulturalDynamics 3 Dr. Quintana . Mon 5:00-6:40 C-228 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

>7 92 A542 EconStab&Growth 3 Dr. Kronish Mon 5:00 A-102 

PI' I 

pli DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

p-H 

pjf8 93 A302 EconGeography 3 Mr. Boucher M&W 6:30-7:45 G-2n 

9 93 A422 Pop&SetPatAfrica 3 Mr. Ballwanz Wed 5:00-6:40 B-OOl 

Course Schedules — Fall Semester 93 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 



240 94 

241 94 

242 94 

243 94 

244 94 

245 94 

246 94 

247 94 

248 94 

249 94 

250 94 



A103 
A108 
Alio 
Alll 
A211 
A322 
A412 
A435 
A517 
A520 
A529 



DevErlyWestCiv 

DevAfricanCiv 

DevAmerCiv 

SelTpcsAmerHist 

USSinceWrldWrl . . . . 

HstryMiddleAges 

AmerHistoriography . . 
EmrgModAmer,! 820-76 

NewDealEra 

US-FarEastReltns 

EurDictat,1919-39 



3 Mr. Bell Tu&Th 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Mr. Keenen . . . M&W 

3 Dr. Royer .... Tu&Th 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Mr. Macaluso . . M&W 

3 Dr. Royer .... Wed 

3 Mrs. DeBoer . . . M&W 

3 Mr. Kops Wed 

3 Dr. More Mon 

3 Dr. Barker .... Tues 



6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

7:30 

8:00-9:15 

7:30 

5:00 

7:30 



G-2i: 
G-2r 
G-30( 
G-30< 
G-21( 
G-31' 
L-20' 
G-21 
S-10 
C-31 
C-22 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



251 95 A200 

252 95 A408 

253 95 A512 

254 95 A522 



255 96 Alll 

256 96 A565 

257 96 A565 

258 96 A566 

259 96 A574 



IntroPoliSci 3 

PolThtToFrRev 3 

Or&DevConst 2 

GrBrit&Comwlth 2 



Dr. Johnson . . . Tu&Th 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Balfe Mon 

Mr. Utete Tues 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 



Race&EthncRel 3 

1 SocioOfYouth 3 

2 SocioOfYouth 3 

MetroCommunity 3 

SocioCult&EthncGr 3 



Staff M&W 

Staff Tues 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Alloway . . . Mon 
Staff Thurs 



6:30-7:45 
7:30 

5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 



8:00-9:15 

5:00 

7:30 

5:00 

7:30 



G-21 
B-00 
B-00 
B-00 



F-lCl 
G-lCl 

G-2CJ, 
G-llj 
B-OC 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 



260 97 A539 VoiceDisorders 3 Staff 

261 97 A581A Diag&CorChldLrnDisb . . 3 Staff 

262 97 A583 TchgSpLanglmprdChld . . 3 Staff 



Mon 7:30-9:10 K-i: 
Tues 7:30-9:10 K-L' 
Wed 7:30-9:10 K-1 



263 99 A467 



Florida 



FIELD STUDIES 

2 Staff 



Dec 23— Dec 30, 1970 m 



94 Course Schedules — Fall Semester 



DAILY SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 
FALL SEMESTER, 1970 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



E\ig. & Rm. 



onday 
132 



4:00 P.M. 
30 404 



li 179 60 A537 

onday 
032 
035 
037 
042 
054 
060 
071 
086 
089 
104 
106 



131 



5:00 P.M. 
15 A510 
15 A520 
15 A525 
15 A533 
15 A564 
15 A580 
15 A607 
20 A500 
20 A519A 
24 A502 
24 A521A, 
B, C or D 
30 403 



135 05 101 

136 40 422 

148 46 A551 

157 50 A461X 

163 50 A572 

170 60 461 

177 60 A526 

196 65 A565 

211 73 A413 
226 82 A420 



236 91 A537 

237 92 A542 
249 94 A520 
253 95 A512 

258 96 A566 

nday 6:30 P.M. 
001 10 AlOl 

077 20 A105 

080 20 A106 

085 20 A362 



Organization and Administration of 
School Libraries (Also meets 

Wednesday and Friday) Miss Gibson S-102 

Orchestra I (Also meets Wednesday) , . . Dr. Oneglia M-019 



Educational Administration I 

Secondary School Administration 

School Plant Planning 

Educational Thought to the 20th Century . 

Dynamics of Group Process 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling . . . 
Field Work and Practicum in Social Work . 

Greek Drama 

Myth: Origin and Development 

Curriculum Construction in Art Education . 
Sculpture 

Reading Materials for Children and Youth : 
Selection and Evaluation (Also meets 

Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday) 

Swahili I (Also meets Wednesday) .... 
Methods of Teaching Foreign Language 

in Elementary Schools 

Contemporary Spanish-American Poetry . . 

Introduction to Computer Science 

Teaching of General Mathematics 

Influence of Music on Behavior 

Jazz 

Psychology and Education of Socially 

and Emotionally Handicapped Children . . 

Drug Abuse Problem 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 
(Meets Monday 5:00-9:00 p.m. and 

Wednesday 5:00-6:40) 

Cultural Dynamics 

Economic Stability and Growth 

U. S. - Far Eastern Relations 

Origin and Development of the 

Constitution, 1619-1835 

The Metropolitan Community 



Dr. Mosier G-206 

Dr. Peckham H-004 

Dr.Merlo S-102 

Mrs. Danzig F-106 

Dr. Gregg G-214 

Staff G-109 

Dr. Williams H-003 

Dr. Farley L-135 

Mrs. Barrett G-110 

Mrs. Geiss L-209 

Mr. deLeeuw L-126 



Miss Gibson S-101 

Mr. Ngari G-306 

Mrs. Susi G-315 

Dr. Prieto G-314 

Mr. Mutter V-161 

Dr. Sobel V-154 

Staff M-011 

Dr. Oneglia M-015 

Mrs. Litovsky G-208 

Dr. Hoitsma P-005 



Staff F-206 

Dr. Quintana C-228 

Dr.Kronish A-102 

Dr. More C-310 

Dr. Balfe B-OOl 

Dr. Alloway G-111 



Business Organization and Management 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff C-316 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff G-216 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff G-1 15 

American Fiction to 1900 

(Also meets Wednesday) Mr. Paul G-1 18 

Schedule of Classes — Fall Semester 95 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & 



093 21 AlOO 1 Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

101 24 A410 Masterpieces of World Art 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

116 28 A250 Foundations of Industry — Plastics 

119 28 A344 Cabinet Construction 

139 41 A200B Intermediate French II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

144 46 AlOl Selected Readings: 19th & 20th Centuries 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

149 49 AlOOA Beginning Italian I 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

151 50 AlOl Introduction to Modern Mathematics 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

229 83 AlOO Introduction to Physical Science 

(Meets Monday 6:30-7:45 p.m. and 

Wednesday 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 

Economic Geography 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

The Development of American Civilization 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

History of the Middle Ages 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Research Seminar in Business Education . . 
Instructional Innovations 

017 15 A424 1 Teacher, School and Society 

019 15 A436 Curriculum and Methods of Sex Education 

023 15 A503 1 Methods of Research 

028 15 A504 Action Research for Teachers 

029 15 A5 05 The Two Year Junior College 

043 15 A535 The Teaching of Communication Skills . . 

044 15 A540 1 Supervision I 

063 15 A582 1 Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information 

091 20 A535A Defoe, Pope, Swift 

097 21 A490 Group Discussion and Leadership 

107 24 A525A Metalwork and Jewelry I or II 

or B 

125 28 A507 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational- 
Technical Education 

158 50 A525 Complex Variables I 

184 65 A510 Research Methods in Psychology 

189 65 A56O 1 Advanced Educational Psychology 

199 65 A574 Individual Intelligence Testing 

213 73 A5l6 Community and Environmental Aspects 

of Health 

217 76 A554 Orientation in Sports Medicine 

260 97 A539 Voice Disorders 



Staff 



A-1 



238 93 A302 
242 94 Alio 
245 94 A322 



Monday 7:30 P.M. 
009 10 A603 
015 15 A420 



Dr. Kampf L-1 

Mr. Olsen F-2 

Mr. Schumm F-1; 

Mr. Stephen G-l 

Staff G-: 

Mr. Battista G-; • 

Mr. Scheitoin F- p 

Mr. Hamdan V-! 3 

Mr. Boucher G-. 

Mr. Keenen . . . G- 
Mr. Macaluso G- 

I 

Dr. Froehlich C- 

Miss Baker and 

Mr.Tetens C- 

Staff F-i 

Dr. Runden G- 

Staff H- 

Staff H-. 

Dr. Merlo S-' 

Mr. Donaruma .... G- 
Mr. Cuff G 



Dr. Kenyon G 

Dr. Radner G 

Mr. Moll A 

Mr. Kyle L 



Staff F 

Mr. McConnell V 

Dr. Haupt G 

Mrs. Garland G 

Dr. Shapiro G 

Dr. Redd G 

Dr. Horn P 

Staff K! 



Monday 8:00 P.M. 
002 10 A201 
078 20 A105 



Accounting I (Also meets Wednesday) . . Staff 
2 Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff 



96 Schedule of Classes — Fall Semester 



Hi 
IB 
% 
\il 



Course No. Sec. 


No. Course Title 


Instructor 


Bids. &Rm. 


: 082 20 A252 


Contemporary Drama: Anderson to the 








Present (Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Johnston 


G-115 


1 095 21 A106 


Oral Interpretation of Literature 






2 


(Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


A-lOl 


1 137 41 AlOOA 


Beginning French I 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Sergent 


G-309 


}• H8 41 A200A 


Intermediate French I 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mrs. Sergent 


G-307 


: 150 49 A200A 


Intermediate Italian I 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Battista 


. . G-308 


:> 181 65 AlOO 1 


General Psychology 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


G-306 


230 84 AlOO 


Fundamentals of Earth Science 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Hamilton 


B-004 


1 244 94 A211 


The United States since World War I 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


. G-216 


247 94 A435 


Emergence of Modern America, 1820-1876 








(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mrs. DeBoer 


. G-217 


255 96 Alll 


Race and Ethnic Relations 








(Also mets Wednesday) 


Staff 


. . F-105 


lesday 9:00 A.M. 








' 200 65 A575 1 


Projective Techniques I 


Dr. Kraemer . 


. E-OOl 


lesday 1:00 P.M. 








197 65 A567 


Abnormal Psychology 


Dr. Sugarman 


. H-011 


lesday 4:00 P.M. 








178 60 A535 


Band I (Also meets Thursday) 


Mr. Shadel 


. M-019 


lesday 5:00 P.M. 








: 003 10 A401 


Principles and Methods of Teaching 






1 

006 10 A470 


General Business 


Mr. Hand 


. C-316 


Business Education for Teachers of the 








Disadvantaged 


Staff 


. . C-117 


021 15 A461 


The Junior High School Curriculum . . . . 


Mr. Cuff 


. G-206 


030 15 A507 


Measurement and Evaluation I 


Dr. Lang 


. H-003 


036 15 A520 2 


Secondary School Administration 


Dr. Bellagamba . . 


. . C-228 


046 15 A545 
050 15 A552 


Social Forces in Education 


Mrs. Bredemeier . 
Mr. Brunner .... 


. G-110 


The Nature of Reading 


. C-109 


065 15 A583 


Educational Guidance 


Staff 


. H-004 


068 15 A587 


Administration and Supervision of 








Guidance Programs 


Staff 


. G-118 


073 15 A619 


Seminar in Administration: 








Supervision and Curriculum 


Dr. Peckham 


. . S-101 


096 21 A440 


Theater History: Classical to Elizabethan 


Staff 


. A-102 


' 108 24 A531A, 


Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture 


Mr. McCreath . . 


L-129 


B, C or D 








, 113 26 427 


The Inner City Family 


Dr. Sandford .... 


. F-104 


' 128 29 A451 


Vocational Guidance 


Mr. VanBenschoten 


F-106 


' 131 30 403 


Reading Materials for Children and Youth: 






• 


Selection and Evaluation (Also meets 








Monday, Wednesday and Friday) 


Miss Gibson 


. S-102 


134 40 408 


Development of the Latin Language 


Dr. Kelly 


. G-214 


1 146 46 A516 


Survey of Medieval Spanish Literature . . 


Dr. Barbeito 


G-314 


153 50 A403 


Techniques and Applications of Statistics 


Mr. Koellner . 


V-350 


1 156 50 A431X 


Foundations of Modern Algebra 


Mr. Garfunkel 


V-161 


162 50 A564 


Ordinary Differential Equations I 

Recreational Music 


Dr. Chai . 


. V-163 


169 60 460 


Staff 


M-on 




Schedule of 


Classes— Fall Semester 97 



Course Noi 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & 



194 65 A564 Psychology and Education of Physically 

and Mentally Handicapped Children ..... Dr. Duryea 
227 82 A530 Qualitative Organic Analysis 

(Meets Tuesday 5:00-6:40 and 

Thursday 5 :00-9:00 p.m.) Mr. Flynn 

233 90 A410 The Newspaper in the Classroom 

(By invitation only) Dr. Cohen 



256 96 A565 1 Sociology of Youth 



Staff 



G-2 



V-3! 

G-2 
G-1 



Tuesday 6:30 P.M. 
004 10 A405 
084 20 A341 
094 21 AlOO 

099 24 AlOO 

117 28 A260 

118 28 A332 

143 46 AlOOA 
152 50 A105 



182 65 AlOO 


2 


223 81 AlOO 




231 84 A120 




240 94 A103 




251 95 A200 




Tuesday 7:30 P.M. 




007 10 A501 




013 15 A404 




020 15 A451 




024 15 A503 


2 


040 15 A532 


1 


045 15 A540 


2 


049 15 A550 




058 15 A571 




066 15 A585 


1 


072 15 A610 




102 24 A419A 




B, C or D 




112 26 A420 




129 29 A471 




152 50 A425X 




164 50 A590 





Business Economics (Also meets Thursday) 
Art of Poetry (Also meets Thursday) 
Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to the Visual Arts 
(Meets on Tuesday 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 
Foundations of Industry — Metals 
(Meets on Tuesday 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 
Screen Process Reproduction 
(Meets on Tuesday 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 
Beginning Spanish I (Also meets Thursday) 
Elements of Statistical Reasoning 

(Also meets Thursday) 

General Psychology (Also meets Thursday) 

Biological Sciences 

(Meets Tuesday 6:30-7:45 p.m. and 

Thursday 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 

Descriptive Astronomy 

(Also meets Thursday) 

The Development of Early Western 
Civilization (Also meets Thursday) . . . . 
Introduction to Political Science 
(Also meets Thursday) 



Principles and Problems of Business 

Education 

Supervised Teaching Seminar 

Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 

Methods of Research 

Principles of Curriculum Development . . . 

Supervision I 

Literature for Adolescents 

Environmental Education 

Group Guidance and Counseling Activities 

The Personnel Services Team 

Life Drawing 



Staff 

Dr. McGee . 

Staff 

Mr. deLeeuw 

Staff 



Mr. Atkins 
Staff .... 



Mr. Koegel 
Staff 



Staff 

Dr. Kowalski 
Mr. Bell . . . . 
Dr. Johnson 



C- 

G-l 

A-ll 

i 

L-:; 

F-l 

G-: 

»■ 

J8 
88 

181 



F-] 
G-.'i 



F--: 
V-: 
G-: 
G-: 



Dr. Nanassy . . 

Staff 

Mrs. Gaeng . . . 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Miss Schantz . . 
Dr. Ambry . . . . 

Mr. Mills 

Dr. Davis 

Mr. Czerkowicz 



Teaching Family Living in the Public 

Schools Mrs. Bernstein . . . 

Vocational-Technical In-Service Super- 
vised Teaching Seminar (Meets for an 

entire academic year.) Mr. VanBenschoten 

Advanced Calculus I Mr. Wolff 

Seminar in Mathematics Education .... Mr. Garfunkel and 

Mr. Koellner 



Ml 
C- 

G-; 

H- 
H-ti 

G-1 lest 
G- 
C- 
F 
G- 
S- 

111 



F- 



I) 



F-; 
V- 



98 Schedule of Classes— Fall Semester 



Course No. 


176 60 


A519 


185 


65 


A520 


191 


65 


A561 


202 


65 


A578 


214 


73 


A525 


218 


76 


A575 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 


BIdg. & Rm. 


Dr. Engelhard . 


. M-0I3 


Dr. Brown and 




Dr. Seymour . . 


G-214 


Dr. Koppel . . 


G-215 


Dr. Shapiro . . , 


. , . G-308 


Dr. Hoitsma 


. C-117 



221 80 A410A 



228 82 A415 



232 84 
235 91 



A512 
A532 



250 94 A529 
254 95 A522 
261 97 A581A 



The Kodaly System in Music Education 
Proseminar 1 



I Developmental Psychology 

Psychological Tests and Measurements . . 
History and Foundations of Health . . 
Philosophical and Sociological Founda- 
tions of Physical Education 

Junior High School Science Demonstra- 
tions 

Modern Chemistry I (Also meets Thurs- 
day) (Open to N.S.F. students only) . . . 

Paleoecology 

Applied Anthropology 

Europe of the Dictators, 1919-1939 . . . 
Great Britain and the Commonwealth . . 
Diagnosis and Correction of Children 
with Learning Disabilities 



Dr. Wacker P-005 

Mr. Placek V-265 

Mr. Wilson, Dr. Gawley, 

Mr. Zabady F-204 

Mr. Ramsdell ... B-004 

Staff S-102 

Dr. Barker C-228 

Mr. Utete B-OOl 

Staff K-129 



Staff C-310 



jday 8:00 P.M. 

010 11 A208 Salesmanship (Also meets Thursday) . 

079 20 A105 3 Composition and Literature I (Also 

meets Thursday) Staff A-IOI 

081 20 A 106 2 Composition and Literature II (Also 

meets Thursday) Staff G-115 

083 20 A262 Modern European Novel (Also meets 

Thursday) Staff G-1 18 

145 46 A200A Intermediate Spanish I 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff G-309 

166 60 A 100 Introduction to Music 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff 

180 63 A203 Ethics (Also meets Thursday Mr. 

183 65 A201 Child Psychology 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff 

209 73 AlOO Healthful Living (Also meets Thursday) . Staff 

241 94 A108 The Development of African 

Civilization (Also meets Thursday) .... Staff G-217 

243 94 Alll Selected Topics in American History to 

1876 (Also meets Thursday) Dr. Royer G-306 



M-015 

Bridges G-216 

G-307 

F-105 



Inesday 4:00 P.M. 
132 30 404 

1179 60 A537 



Organization and Administration of 
School Libraries (Also meets Monday 

and Friday) Miss Gibson 

Orchestra I (Also meets Monday) Dr. Oneglia 



S-102 
M-019 



hesday 5:00 P.M. 
Oil 11 A551 

025 15 A503 
056 15 A566 

p6l 15 A580 
064 15 A582 



Improvement of Instruction in 

Distributive Education Dr. Hecht C-310 

Methods of Research Dr. Heiss H-003 

Television Production Seminar Mr. Diglio and 

Miss Fantone C-117 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling . Dr. Gregg G-1 10 

Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information Dr. Gelfond H-004 



Schedule of Classes — Fall Semester 99 



Course Nq. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & 



075 


15 A650 


076 


15 A659 


087 


20 A512 


111 


24 A603 


127 


28 A603 


131 


30 403 


258 


05 101 


140 41 A505 


160 50 A543 


171 


60 463 


187 


65 A552 


193 


65 A562 


212 


73 A414 


226 82 A420 


239 


93 A422 



Wednesday 6:30 P.M. 
001 10 AlOl 

077 20 A105 

080 20 A106 

085 20 A362 

093 21 AlOO 

101 24 A410 

122 28 A424 

139 41 A200B 

144 46 AlOl 

149 49 AlOOA 

151 50 AlOl 

229 83 AlOO 

238 93 A302 
242 94 Alio 
245 94 A322 



Research Seminar and Thesis Writing . . 

Research Seminar in Reading 

The English Language 

Seminar in Art 

Research Seminar in Industrial Arts 
(Meets for the entire academic year.) . 
Reading Materials for Children and 
Youth: Seleaion and Evaluation 
(Also meets Monday, Tuesday and 

Friday.) 

Swahili I (Also meets Monday) 

History of the French Language 

Mathematical Statistics I 

Psychological Foundations of Music I 

General Social Psychology 

Dynamics of Human Behavior 

Workshop in Venereal Disease Education 
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (Meets 
Monday 5:00-9:00 p.m. and Wednesday 

5:00-6:40 p.m.) 

Population and Settlement Patterns of 
Africa 

Business Organization and Management 

(Also meets Monday) 

1 Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Monday) 

1 Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Monday) 

American Fiction to 1900 

(Also meets Monday) 

1 Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Monday) 

Masterpieces of World Art 

(Also meets Monday) 

Engineering Graphics (Meets Wednesday 

6:30-10:00 p.m.) 

Intermediate French II 

(Also meets Monday) 

Selected Readings: 19th & 20 Centuries 

(Also meets Monday) 

Beginning Itali?in I 

(Also meets Monday) 

Introduction to Modern Mathematics 

(Also meets Monday) 

Introduction to Physical Science (Meets 

Monday 6:30-7:45 p.m. and Wednesday 

6:30-10:00 p.m.) 

Economic Geography 

(Also meets Monday) 

The Development of American 

Civilization (Also meets Monday) 

History of the Middle Ages 

(Also meets Monday) 



Dr. Davis G-i 

Mr. Brunner C-! 

Mr. Reaske G-' 

Dr. Martens L-'. 

Dr. Earl F- 



Miss Gibson S- 

Mr. Ngari G- 

Mr. Hinshalwood . . G- 

Mr. Dick V- 

Staff M- 

Dr. Worms G- 

Dr. Seymour G- 

Dr. Redd P- 



Staff F- 

Mr. Ballwanz B- 



StaflF 
Staff 
Staff 



Mr. Paul G 

Staff Ar 

Dr. Kampf L 

Mr. Goodall F 

Mr. Stephen G 



Staff 


G 


11 


Mr. Battista . . . 


G 


» 


Mr. Scheitoin . . 


F 


855 
B7 


Mr. Hamdan . . . 


. . . V 


lis 


Mr. Boucher . . . 


G 


1» 


Mr. Keenen 


G 


IJ! 


Mr. Macaluso . . 


G 





100 Schedule of Classes — Fall Semester 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdE. & Rm. 



dnesday 7:30 P.M. 
005 10 A434 

012 11 A553 
014 15 A408 

016 15 A423 
034 15 A514 
038 15 A530 1 

055 15 A564 2 
059 15 A578 

069 15 A601E 

090 20 A531B 
098 21 A567X 
105 24 A511A, 
B, C or D 
124 28 A501 

141 41 A512 
155 50 A428X 
186 65 A550 
190 65 A560 2 
203 65 A580 
216 76 A552 

219 76 A579 

225 81 A541 
246 94 A412 
248 94 A517 
252 95 A408 

257 96 A565 2 
262 97 A583 



Staff G-110 



Dr. Gorman 



G-214 



Introduction to Business Data 

Processing Staff B-003 

Trends in Retail Distribution Dr. Hecht C-310 
Selection and Utilization of A-V 

Materials Staff C-304 

Teaching in the Urban Schools Mr. Millard F-104 

School Law Dr. Merlo S-102 

Curriculum Construction in the 

Secondary School 

Dynamics of Group Process 
Testing and Evaluation in Student 

Personnel Services Dr. Gelfond H-004 

"Workshop in Education : Psychology- 
Sex Education Dr. Runden G-210 

Seventeenth Century Prose Dr. Schwegel G-206 

Seminar in Dramatic Production Mr. Sobolik A- 102 

Painting Staff L-225 

Curriculum Construction and Course 

Organization in Industrial Education . . Staff F-106 

French Medieval Epic Mr. Hinshalwood . G-314 

Introduction to Topology Dr. Parzynski ... V-163 

Quantitative and Statistical Methods . Dr. Rotter G-209 

Advanced Education Psychology Dr. Seymour G-315 

Personality Dr. Worms G-1 1 1 

Seminar in Current Problems in Men's 

Athletics Staff G-208 

Advanced Tests and Measurements in 

Physical Education Staff P-005 

Intermediary Metabolism Dr. Koditschek .... V-351 

American Historiography Dr. Royer L-209 

The New Deal Era Mr. Kops S-101 

Political Thought to the French 

Revolution Staff B-OOl 

Sociology of Youth Staff G-207 

Teaching Speech to Language Impaired 

Children Staff K-129 



dnesday 8:00 P.M. 

002 10 A201 

078 20 A105 

082 20 A252 

095 21 A106 

137 41 AlOOA 

138 41 A200A 
150 49 A200A 
181 65 AlOO 



Accounting I (Also meets Monday) ... Staff C-316 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Monday) Staff G-1 18 

Contemporary Drama: Anderson to the 

Present (Also meets Monday) Mr. Johnston G-1 15 

Oral Interpretation of Literature 

(Also meets Monday) Staff A-101 

Beginning French I 

(Also meets Monday) Mr. Sergent G-309 

Intermediate French I 

(Also meets Monday) Mrs. Sergent G-307 

Intermediate Italian I 

(Also meets Monday) Mr. Battista G-308 

General Psychology 

(Also meets Monday) Staff G-306 



Schedule of Classes — Fall Semester 101 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & 



230 84 AlOO 
244 94 A211 
247 94 A435 
255 96 Alll 

Thursday 9:00 A.M. 
201 65 A575 2 



Thursday 


1: 


DO P.M. 


207 


65 


A660 


Thursday 4:00 P.M. 


052 


15 


A556 


130 


30 


200 


178 60 A535 


Thursday 5: 


00 P.M. 


008 


10 


A512 


026 


15 


A503 


031 


15 


A509 


039 


15 


A530 


048 


15 A549 


067 


15 


A585 


070 


15 


A604 


088 20 


A515 


109 


24 


A551A, 




B, 


C or D 


114 


26 A510 


133 


40 415 


142 


41 


A516 


147 46 A541 


159 


50 A531 


167 


60 


160 


168 60 A409 


188 


65 


A553 


204 65 


A581 


206 65 


A593 


227 


82 


A530 



Fundamentals of Earth Science | 

(Also meets Monday) Mr. Hamilton B-C 

The United States since World War I 

(Also meets Monday) Staff G-2j 

Emergence of Modern America, 1820-1876 

(Also meets Monday) Mrs. DeBoer G-^ 

Race and Ethnic Relations 

(Also meets Monday) Staff F-1 



Projective Techniques I Dr. Kraemer E-C 



Seminar in Educational Psychology 



Dr. Duryea H-( 



Corrective and Remedial Reading, 

Part I Miss Schantz C 

Introduction to School Library Service . . . Miss Gibson S-1 

Band I (Also meets Tuesday) Mr. Shadel M-( 



Improvement of Instruction in General 

Business Subjects Dr. Nanassy C 

Methods of Research Dr. Heiss H-( 

Medical Problems in Education Dr. Williams F-1 

Curriculum Construction in the 

Secondary School Staff H-(l' 

Comparative Studies of Educational 

Systems Mr. Bernstein .... 

Group Guidance and Counseling 

Activities Mr. Mills G-l 

Field Work and Practicum in Guidance . . Dr. Gelfond and 

Dr. Gregg A- 

Modern American Criticism Dr. Healey G' 

Intaglio Printing Mr. Vernacchia .... L 



Interdisciplinary Study of the Family 



Miss Guthrie F- 



Classical Mythology Staff G-^ 

Rabelais and Montaigne Dr. Applewhite .... G-: 

Spanish American Novel to 1900 Dr. Rivera-Rivera . . G-: 

Abstract Algebra I Mr. Kalmanson .... V-] 

Introduction to Music Therapy I Staff M-( 

Development of the Opera Dr. Sacher M-( 

Urban Psychology Dr. Williams .... G-/ 

Motivation Staff G-l 

Clinical Interviev^^ing Dr. Brower and 

Dr. Sugarman .... G-a 
Qualitative Organic Analysis (Meets 
Tuesday 5:00-6:40 p.m. and Thursday 
5 :00-9.00 p.m.) Mr. Flynn V-S 



102 Schedule of Classes— Fall Semester 



Course No. Sec. No. Course Title 


Instructor 


BIdg. & Rm. 


i-sday 6:30 P.M. 








001 10 A405 


Business Economics (Also meets Tuesday 


Staff 


C-310 


,084 20 A341 


Art of Poetry (Also meets Tuesday) 


Dr. McGee 


G-115 


094 21 AlOO 


Fundamentals of Speech 








(Also meets Tuesday) 


Staff 


A-101 


123 28 A496 


Jewelry Making and Lapidary 








Meets Thursday 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 


Mr. Dorner 


F-118 


143 46 AlOOA 


Beginning Spanish I 








( Also meets Tuesday) 


Staff 


G-309 


152 50 A105 


Elements of Statistical Reasoning 








(Also meets Tuesday) 


Mr. Koegel 


F-105 


i 182 65 AlOO 


2 General Psychology 








(Also meets Tuesday) 


. Staff 


. . G-306 


223 81 AlOO 


Biological Sciences (Meets Tuesday 
6:30-7:45 p.m. and Thursday 6:30- 








10:00 p.m.) 


. Staff 


, . F-209 


231 84 A120 


Descriptive Astronomy 








(Also meets Tuesday) 


Dr. Kowalski 


V-259 


240 94 A103 


The Development of Early Western 








Civilization (Also meets Tuesday) 


. Mr. Bell 


. . G-217 


251 95 A200 


Introduction to Political Science 








(Also meets Tuesday) 


Dr. Johnson 


G-216 


:sday 7:30 P.M. 








018 15 A424 


2 Teacher, School and Society 


Staff 


. G-207 


033 15 A510 


2 Educational Administration I 


. Dr. Ambry ... 


. . G-109 


041 15 A532 


2 Principles of Curriculum Development 


Staff 


. G-110 


04^ 15 A547 


Existentialism in Education 


. Dr. Haas 


. G-111 


'051 15 A554 


Case Studies of Reading Difficulties, 








Part I 


. Mrs. Ward 


C-109 


057 15 A568 


Production of A-V Materials: Part I — 








Non-Projected Materials 


Mr. Ruezinsky 


C-117 


062 15 A580 


3 Principles of Guidance and Counseling . 


Staff 


. H-004 


092 20 A603 


English Research Writing 


Mr. Roberts . . 


G-206 


100 24 A408A, 


Multi-Media 


. Mr. Kahn 


L-135 


B, C or D 








103 24 A423 


Teaching of Art History to Grades K-12 


Staff 


. . . L-209 


110 24 A591 


Selected Problems in Art History 


Dr. Kampf ... 


L-108 


115 26 A560 


Clothing and Human Behavior 


Mrs. Mukherjee 


F-104 


120 28 A402 


Curriculum and Teaching of Industrial 








Education 


Mr. Olsen 


. F-106 


161 50 A555 


Differential Geometry 


Mr. Stevens . 


V-163 


192 65 A561 


2 Developmental Psychology 


Dr. Duryea 


G-215 


198 65 A573 


Physiological Psychology 


Miss Garcia 


G-209 


215 73 A603 


Research Seminar in Health Education 








(Meets for the entire academic year.) 


Dr. Hoitsma 


G-2()8 


200 76 A603 


Research Seminar in Physical Education 








(Meets for the entire academic year.) . . . 


Dr. Schleede 


P-005 


228 82 A415 


Modern Chemistry I ( Also meets Tuesday) 


Dr. Wilson, 






(Open to N. S. F. students only.) 


Dr. Gawley, 








Mr. Zabady 


F-204 


259 96 A574 


Sociology of Cultural and Ethnic Groups 


Staff 


B-OOl 




Schedule of 


Classes — Fall Semester 103 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



Bldg. & 



Thursday 8:00 P.M. 
010 11 A208 
079 20 A105 

081 20 A106 

083 20 A262 

145 46 A200A 

166 60 AlOO 

180 63 A203 
183 65 A201 
209 73 AlOO 
241 94 A108 

243 94 Alll 

Friday 

195 65 E564 

205 65 E592 

Friday 4:00 P.M. 
132 30 404 



Friday 5:00 P.M. 
131 30 403 



222 80 A505 



Saturday 8:00 A.M. 
210 73 A408 

Saturday 8:30 A.M. 
022 15 A501 
224 81 A512 

Saturday 10:30 A.M. 

027 15 A503 5 
165 50 A461X 

234 90 A603 



Salesmanship (Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Modern European Novel 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Intermediate Spanish I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Introduction to Music 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Ethics (Also meets Tuesday) 

Child Psychology (Also meets Tuesday) 
Healthful Living (Also meets Tuesday) 
The Development of African Civilization 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Selected Topics in American History 

to 1876 (Also meets Tuesday) 



Psychology and Education of Physically 
and Mentally Handicapped Children 
(For Newark Fellowship students only) 
Special Diagnostic Techniques 
(For Newark Fellowship students only) 



Organization and Administration of 

School Libraries 

(Also meets Monday and Wednesday) 



Reading Materials for Children and 
Youth: Selection and Evaluation 
(Also meets Monday, Tuesday and 

Wednesday) 

Research Seminar in Science 
(Meets alternate weeks and by 
appointment for the academic year.) 



Driver Education 

(Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor) 



Tests and Measurements in Education 

General Ecology 

(Meets 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) . . . 



Methods of Research 

Introduction to Computer Science 
(Open to N.S.F. students only) 
Social Studies Research Seminar 



Staff C- 

Staff A- 

Staff G- 

Staff G- 

Staff G- 

Staff M- 

Mr. Bridges G- 

Staff G- 

Staff F- 

Staff G- 

Dr. Royer G- 



Dr. Hauer ... Jersey 
State Col 

Dr. Shapiro . . . Jersey ' 
State Col 



Miss Gibson S- 

Miss Gibson S- 

Dr. Becker F 

Dr. Coder C 

Dr. Lang H' 

Dr. Shubeck V 

Dr. Lang Hi 

Mr. Koellner V 

Staff C 



104 Schedule of Classes — Fall Semester 



COURSE REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 
SPRING SEMESTER, 1971 

graduate classes, departments have the option of meeting 3 s.h, for two or three 
tact hours with extended assignments when meeting the shorter time, 
le departments have not estabHshed ending times for their classes. Students 
jid anticipate a maximum of 50 minutes per semester hour on non-laboratory 
ses in estimating the ending hour. 

the information below for completing the registration form. Refer to course 
.riptions and full titles under Course Offerings, beginning on page 36 Building 
;s may be found on page 34. 



Oept. Course Sect. 
Ko. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 





Bide- 


Time 


Rm. 


6:30-7:45 


C-316 


5:00-6:40 


C-316 


7:30-9:10 


C-310 


7:30-10:00 


C-108 


7:30-9:10 


C-316 


5:00-6:40 


C-317 


5:00-6:40 


C-316 


5:00-6:40 


C-310 


8:00-9:15 


C-310 


6:30-7:20 


C-310 


7:30-10:00 


C-310 



BUSINESS EDUCATION 



Accounting II 

Consumer Economics 

Investments 

UnitRecordEquip I . . 
EvalCurLitBusEduc 
I mpl nstTyp&ClerPrac 
ResSemBusEd 



3 Staff M&W 

2 Staff Tues 

2 Dr. Haas Mon 

3 Staff Wed 

2 Dr. Nanassy . . Tues 

2 Dr. Kahn Tues 

2 Dr. Nanassy Thurs 



DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 



MerchandiseMath 2 

Marketing 3 

RetailStoreManagement . . 2 

Visual Merchandising .... 3 



Mrs. Sherdell . . Mon 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Dr. Hecht Wed 



DevDisEducCurr 



2 Dr. Hecht Wed 5:00-6:40 C-310 



EDUCATION 



SupvTchgSem 

Sel&UtilA-VMat3 

Instrlnnovations 

TchgUrbanSchools 

Tchr,School&Soc 

Tchr,School&Soc 

Curr&MethSexEi 

GuidClrmTchr 

Tests&MeasEd 

MethOfResearch 

MethOfResearch 

MethOfResearch 

MethOfResearch 

MethOfResearch 

ActResrchTchrs 

Meas&Eval II 

EducAdmin I 

EducAdmin I 

SchBusAdmin 

School Finance 

SystemsAnalEduc 



Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Millard 

Staff 

Staff 

Dr. Runden 
Mrs. Gaeng 
Dr. Lang 
Staff 
Staff 

Dr. Heiss 
Dr. Heiss 
Dr. Lang 

Staff 

Dr. Lang 
Dr. Mosier 
Dr. Ambry 
Dr. Merlo 
Dr. Merlo 
Dr. Merlo 



Tues 

Wed 

Mon 

Wed 

Mon 

Wed 

Mon 

Mon 

Sat 

Mon 

Tues 

Wed 

Thurs 

Sat 

Mon 

Mon 

Wed 

Thurs 

Tues 

Tues 

Mon 



7:30 

7:30 

7:30 

7:30 

7:30 

7:30 

7:30 

^:30 

8:30 a.m. 

5:00 

5:00 

^:30 

^:30 

10:30 a.m. 

30 

00 

00 

30 

00 

30 

30 



G-210 
C-304 
C-304 
F-104 
G-109 
G-109 
G-215 
H-004 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
F-104 
H-004 
H-004 
H-004 
S-102 
S-102 
S-102 



Course Schedules — Spring Semester 105 



Mas. 


Dept 


. Course Sect 


No. 


No. 


No. No. 


034 


15 


A520 


035 


15 


A530 1 


036 


15 


A530 2 


037 


15 


A531 


038 


15 


A532 1 


039 


15 


A532 2 


040 


15 


A540 1 


041 


15 


A540 2 


042 


15 


A541 


043 


15 


A545 


044 


15 


A548 


045 


15 


A551N 


046 


15 


A553 


047 


15 


A555 


048 


15 


A557 


049 


15 


A558 


050 


15 


A564 


051 


15 


A565 


052 


15 


A567 


053 


15 


A569 


054 


15 


A570 


055 


15 


A572 


056 


15 


A573 


057 


15 


A577 


058 


15 


A580 1 


059 


15 


A580 2 


060 


15 


A580 3 


061 


15 


A582 


062 


15 


A585 


063 


15 


A586 


064 


15 


A589 


065 


15 


A591 


066 


15 


A601E 


067 


15 


A603 


068 


15 


A604 


069 


15 


A607 


070 


15 


A619 


071 


15 


A628 


072 


15 


A650 


073 


15 


A659 


074 


15 


A678 


075 


20 


A105 1 


076 


20 


A105 2 


077 


20 


A106 1 


078 


20 


A106 2 


079 20 A354 


080 20 A418 


081 


20 A432 


082 


20 


A441 


083 


20 A454 


084 


20 


A471 


085 


20 A513 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



SecSchAdmin 3 

CurrConstrSecSch 3 

CurrConstrSecSch 3 

MidSchCurr&Org 3 

PrinCurrDev 3 

PrinCurrDev 3 

Supervision I 3 

Supervision I 3 

SupvSpecialFields 3 

SocForcesEduc 3 

ContemEdThought 3 

Admin&SupvReadProg . . 3 

TechRdglmpSecSch 2 

CaseStudRdgDif:!! 3 

Corr&RemedRdg:II 3 

FieldExperRead 2 

DynamicsGroupProc .... 3 

ConsultationOrgDev 3 

TVProgSeminar 3 

ProdA-VMats II: Pro 3 

CounselAdults 3 

ConservationEd 3 

CurrEnvironEd 3 

SocialCaseWork 3 

PrinGuidCounsel 3 

PrinGuidCounsel 3 

PrinGuidCounsel 3 

VocGuidOccupInfo 3 

GroupGuidCounAct 3 

ElemSchGuidServ 3 

StudPerServHighEd 3 

EdLatinAmer 3 

WkspEd:Psy-SexEd 3 

PrinPracResearch 3 

FldWkPracGuidCoun .... 3 

FldWrk&PracSocWrk ... 3 

SemAd:Supv&Curr 2 

FldExpAdm&Supv 2 

ResSem&ThesisWrit ... 3 

ResSemReading 2 

TechOfEval 3 



Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Cuff 

Staff 

Staff 

Dr. Peckham 

Staff 

Mr. Cuff 

Mrs. Bredemeier 

Dr. Haas 

Mrs. Ward . . . . 
Mr. Brunner 
Mrs. Ward . . . . 
Miss Schantz . . 
Miss Schantz . . . 
Dr. Gorman . . . 
Dr. Gorman . . . 

Staff 

Mr. Ruezinsky . 

Mr. Mills 

Staff 

Dr. Ambry . . . . 
Mr. Millard . . . 

Staff 

Mr. Mills 

Dr. Kenyon . . . 

Staff 

Dr. Gregg . . . . 
Dr. Gelfond . . . 

Dr. Davis 

Mr. Bernstein . . 
Dr. Runden . . 

Dr. Heiss 

Dr. Gelfond & 
Dr. Gregg . . . . 
Dr. Williams . . 
Dr. Peckham . 
Dr. Peckham . . 

Dr. Davis 

Miss Schantz . . 
Dr. Gelfond . . . 



Tues 

Wed 

Thurs 

Mon 

Wed 

Sat 

Mon 

Tues 

Tues 

Thurs 

Mon 

Tues 

Tues 

Thurs 

Thurs 

To Be 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Wed 

Mon 

Wed 

Thurs 

Tues 

Tues 

Mon 

Tues 

Thurs 

Wed 

Thurs 

Wed 

Tues 

Tues 

Wed 

Thurs 



5:00 
7:30 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 

10:30 a.m. 
7:30 
7:30 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 
7:30 
5:00 
7:30 
4:00 
Arranged 
5:00 
7:30 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 
7:30 
7:30 
5:00 
7:30 
5:00 
5:00 
7:30 
7:30 
5:00 
7:30 
7:30 
7:30 
5:00 



Thurs 5:00 

Mon 5:00 

Sat 8:30 a.m. 
To Be Arranged 

Wed 5:00 

Wed 5:00 

Thurs 7:30 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 



Comp&Literature I . . . . 
Comp&Literature I . . . . 
Comp&Literature II . . 
Comp&Literature II . . . 
ShakesprMajorPlays . . . 
EngLng:HstGrmLng I . 
MedievalLiterature . . 
ModPoet : FrSymbToEliot 

Film&Society 

TchgEnglnSecSchl .... 
RenaissancelnEurope . . 



3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Mr. Paul M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

2 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Dr. Farley .... Wed 
3 Mrs. Becker .... Tues 
3 Dr. McGee .... Sat 



6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

6:30-7:45 

8:00-8:50 

5:00-7:20 

5:00 

10:30 a.m. 



106 Course Schedules — Spring Semester 



Dept 


Course Sect. 


No. 


No. No. 


20 


A519B 


20 


A524 


20 


A526A 


i 20 


A543 


1 20 


A546 


1 20 A603 


i 21 


AlOO 1 


21 


AlOO 2 


21 


A204 


; 21 


A471 


21 


A566 


1 24 


AlOO 


24 


A302 


24 


A406A, 


B, 


C or D 


24 A413 


24 


A419A, 


B, 


C or D 


24 


A423 


24 


A511A, 


B, 


C or D 


24 


A521A, 


B, 


C or D 


24 


A531A, 


B, 


C or D 


1 24 


A550A, 


1 B, 


C or D 


24 A590 


26 A424 


26 A511 


: 26 A540 


26 A603 


28 


A270 


28 


A280 


28 


A351 


28 A361 


28 


A404A, 


B 


or C 


28 


A434 


28 


A443 


28 A496 


28 


A503 


28 


A508 


28 


A601 



Title 



S.H. 



Myth:Thry&PracLit 3 

ContBritishLit 3 

TheoryOfNovel 3 

ContAmerLit 3 

SemAmerWrit: Faulk .... 3 

En^ResrchWriting 3 Mr. Pettegrove Thurs 7:30 



Instructor 


Day 


Ti 


Mrs. Barrett . 


. .Thurs 


5:00 


Mr. Reaske . 


. .Wed 


7:30 


Mr. Rich . . . 


. .Tues 


7:30 


Dr. Healey . . 


. . Mon 


5:00 


Mr. Roberts . 


. . Mon 


7:30 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH AND THEATER 



FundamentalsSpeech 3 

FundamentalsSpeech 3 

FundPubSpeaking 3 

AdvActing 2 

Cost&MakeupForStage ... 3 

DEPARTMENT OF 

IntroVisualArts 3 

FoundsMethArtEd 2 

Photo :ContArtForm .... 2 

ArtTwentiethCentury .... 3 

LifeDrawing 2 

TchgArtHstryK-12 3 

Painting 2 

Sculpture 2 

Ceramics :Pot&Scul 2 

SilkScreenPrinting 2 

ModPhilOfArt 3 



Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Dr. Rockwood . Tues 
Mr. Sobolik ...Wed 

FINE ARTS 

Mr. deLeeuw . . Tues 
Mrs. Geiss . . . Mon 
Mr. Kyle Thurs 

Dr. Kampf .... M&W 
Staff Tues 

Staff Thurs 

Staff Wed 

Staff Mon 

Mr. McCreath . Tues 

Mr. Vernacchia Thurs 

Dr. Kampf . . Thurs 



8:00-9:15 
6:30-7:45 
6:30-7:45 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-10:00 



6:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-10:00 

6:30-7:45 
7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 

5:00-7:30 

5:00-7:30 

5:00-7:30 

7:30-10:00 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Wrkshp:TchgSexEdHEc . . 2 Staff 

ContempIssuesHomeEc ... 2 Dr. Sandford 

ChildlnFamily 2 Mrs. Silver . 

AdvStudHomeEc 3 Miss Ruslink 



Tues 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Sat 10:30 a.m.-l:00 



5:00-6:40 

5:00 

7:30-9:10 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



FndtnsInd-EIec 3 Staff 

Fndtnslnd-Power 3 Mr. Teryek 

PlastMold&Form I 3 Mr. Olsen . 

IndustrialMetals 3 Staff 

IndeoStudlnd 1-3 Staff 



Wed 
Thurs 
Mon 
Tues 



6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 



To Be Arranged 



OffsetLithography 3 Mr. Atkins 

WoodTechnology 3 Mr. Schumm 

JwlryMkg&Lapdry 3 Mr. Dorner 

Hist&ContemlALit 3 Dr. Frankson 

PrbOr&TchColnEdPrgs . . 2 Staff 

IndepStudIA 1-3 Staff 



Tues 

Mon 

Thurs 

Wed 

Mon 



6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 
7:30-9:10 



Bldg. 
Rm. 



G-111 
G-lIl 
G-215 
G-110 
G-206 
G-206 



A-101 
A-101 
A-101 
K-200 
A-102 



L-229 
L-108 
L-131 

L-209 
L-230 

L-108 
L-225 

L-126 

L-129 

L-228 

L-209 



F-104 
F-112 
F-106 
F-112 



F-225 
F-219 
F-223 
F-119 



F-117 
F-118 
F-118 
F-106 
F-106 



To Be Arranged 



Course Schedules — Spring Semester 107 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. Ko. No.. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



DEPARTMENT OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 



123 29 A421 


CurrConstVoc-TechEd ... 3 Mr. Van 








Benschoten 


. Tues 


5:00 


124 29 A471 


V-TIn-SerSupvTchgSem . . 8 Mr. Van 








Benschoten 


. . Tues 


7:30 




(Meets for the entire academic year.) 







125 30 301 

126 30 302 

127 30 303 



128 05 102 

129 06 A425 

130 40 A401 



131 41 AlOOB 

132 41 A200B 

133 41 A525 

134 41 A532 



DEPARTME^^T OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Ref&Bibliography I 2 Miss Gibson . .M&W 4:00-5:40 

(Meets February 1 to March 22.) 

Ref&Bibliography II 2 Miss Gibson ..M&W 4:00-5:40 

(Meets March 24 to May 24.) 

FundaCat&CIass 3 Miss Chesnut ..Tues 4:00-5:15 

Thurs 4:00-5:15 



DEPARTMENT OF LINGUISTICS 



Swahili II 3 

Meth&MatTESL 3 

TchgForLngSecSch 2 



Mr.Ngari ...M&W 5:00-6:30 

Mrs. Susi Mon 5:00-7:30 

Mrs. Knecht . . . Wed 5:00-6:40 



DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 



Beginning French II 
IntermFrench II . . . 
FrenchClassicism . . 
ISCentFrTheater 



3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Thurs 

2 Staff Tues 



00-9:15 
00-9:15 
00-6:40 
00-6:40 



DEPARTMENT OF SPANISH AND ITALIAN LANGUAGES 



135 46 AlOOB 

136 46 A103 

137 46 A200B 

138 46 A505 

139 46 A521 

140 46 A542 

141 49 AlOOB 

142 49 A200B 



BeginSpanish II 

SpGrammar&Comp . . 

IntSpanish II 

HistSpLang 

TheNovelGoldenAge . 
SpAmerNovXXCentury 



Beginltalian II 
Intltalian II 



3 Staff Tu&Th 

2 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

2 Mr. Gloeckner Mon 

2 Dr. Barbeito . . Tues 

2 Dr. Rivera- 
Rivera Thurs 

3 Mr. Battista . . M&W 
3 Mr. Battista . M&W 



6:30-7:45 
6:30-7:20 
8:00-9:15 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 
6:30-7:45 
8:00-9:15 



143 


50 A103 


144 


50 


A104 


145 


50 


A426X 


146 50 A433 


147 


50 A450X 


148 


50 


A470 


149 


50 


A520 


150 


50 


A526 


151 


50 


A527 


152 


50 


A532 


153 


50 


A544 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 



DevelopmentOfMath .... 2 

MathPersonalFinance .... 2 

AdvCalculus II 2 

TheoryOfNumbers 2 

FndtnsGeometry 2 

TchgMath-SrHiSch 2 

SetTheory 2 

ComplexVariables II ... . 2 

FunctionalAnalysis I . . . . 2 

AbstractAlge II 2 

MathStatistics II 2 



G 

G-5 

G-3 



G-5 
G-l 
G- 
G- 



G-? 
G-? 
G-5 
G-5 
G-5 

G-5 
G-5 
G-5 



Staff 


. M&W 


6:30-7:20 
6:30-7:20 


F-1 


Mr. Koegel 


. . Tu&Th 


F-] 


Mr. Wolff . 


. Tues 


7:30-9:10 


V-] 


Mr. Walsh . 


. Wed 


7:30-9:10 


V-] 


Mr. Gugel 


. Mon 


5:00-6:40 


V-] 


Mr. Walsh . 


. Mon 


7:30-9:10 


V-1 


Mr. Stevens 


. Tues 


7:30-9:10 


V-1 


Mr. McConne 


1 Mon 


7:30-9:10 


V-] 


Dr. Parzynski 


. .Wed 


5:00-6:40 


V-] 


Mr. Kalmanso 


n Thurs 


5:00-6:40 


V-] 


Mr. Dick . . 


..Wed 


5:00-6:40 


V-] 



108 Course Schedules — Spring Semester 



. Dept 


. Course Sect 


No. 


No. No. 


1 50 


A 5 60 


> 50 


A565 


; 50 


A570 


50 A574 


50 


A575 


) 60 


261 


) 60 


A408 


60 A426 


60 462 


60 


464 


60 


A503A 


60 A503B 


) 60 A505 


60 A507 


60 


A514 


60 


A521C 


60 


A525 


60 A539 


60 A536 


60 


A538 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



NumericalAnalysis I 
OrdDiffEquats II 
Admin&SupvMath 
ProbAnalSecMath 
NSFSelecTopicsMath 



Mr. Mutter 
Dr. Chai 
Mr. Walsh 
Mr. Garfunkel 
Mr. Garfunkel 



Mon 5:00-6:40 V-161 
Tues 5:00-6:40 V-163 
Thurs 5:00-6:40 V-163 
Tues 5:00-6:40 V-l6l 
Sat 10:30a.m.-12:10 V-154 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



IntroMusTherapy II 2 

ChamberMusic 2 

SurveyMusicLit 2 

MusicInTherapy 3 

PsychFndtnsMusic II 2 

ApplMusI:PrimInstr 2 

ApplMusII:PrimInstr 2 

ApMusIV:PrimInstr 6 

ApMusVI:PrimInstr . . 4 

Counterpoint 2 

ClrmMeth:WoodInstr ... 2 

EthnologAprchMusic ... 2 

MasClMus:GerVocLit ... 2 

Band 2 

Orchestra 2 



Staff Thurs 5:00-6:40 xM-Oll 

Mr. Wilt Wed 5:00-6:40 M-015 

Staff Tu&Th 8:00-8:50 M-015 

Staff Mon 5:00-7:20 M-011 

Staff Wed 5:00-6:40 M-OU 

Staff To Be Arranged 

Staff To Be Arranged 

Staff To Be Arranged 

Staff To Be Arranged 



Mr. Girt . . 


. Tues 


5:00-6:40 


M-015 


Mr. Shadel . 


. .Mon 


5:00-6:40 


M-015 


Mr. Wilt . . 


. Tues 


7:30-9:10 


M-013 


Dr. Wilkes 


. . Mon 


7:30-9:10 


M-015 


Mr. Shadel 


. Tu&Th 


4:00 


M-019 


Dr. Oneglia 


M&W 


4:00 


M-019 



i 63 AI-JO 



DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

HistoryOf Religion 3 Mr. Streetman M&W 8:00-9:15 G-118 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 



65 
65 
65 
65 
S 65 



AlOO 
AlOO 
A200 
A510 
A521 
A540 
A541 
A545 
A549 
A550 
A553 
A560 
A560 
A561 
A561 
A563 
A565 
A566 
A567 
A568 
A573 
A576 
A576 
A578 
A582 
A590 



General Psychology 
General Psychology . . 
EducationalPsych . . . . 

ResMethsPsych 

ProsemPsych II 

RemedBasicSkills . 

CurrDev&MthTchgCln 
Sem :EmotDistChldn 
PsychAduItLrner 
Quan&StatMthds 
UrbanPsychology . . . . 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

AdvEdPsych 3 

AdvEdPsych 3 

DevelopmentalPsych 3 

DevelopmentalPsych 3 

TheoriesOfLearning 3 

PsyEdSocEmotHndCld ... 3 

Psy&EdOfGifted 3 

AbnormalPsych 3 

PsyGroupDyn 3 

PhysioPsych 3 

ProjTech II 3 

ProjTech II 3 

PsychTst&Msrmnts 3 

BehaviorModification 3 

DiagCaseStud I 3 



Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Dr. Haupt .... Mon 

Staff Tues 

Staff Tues 

Mrs. Litovsky . Wed 
Mrs. Litovsky Wed 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Haupt . Mon 
Dr. Williams Thurs 
Dr. Seymour Mon 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Koppel Tues 

Staff Thurs 

Staff Wed 



Mrs. Litovsky 
Dr. Shapiro 
Dr. Sugarman 
Dr. Brown 
Miss Garcia 
Dr. Kraemer 
Dr. Kraemer 
Dr. Duryea 

Staff 

Dr. Seymour 



Tues 

Mon 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Fri 

Tues 

Thurs 

Mon 

Tues 

Thurs 



8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

7:30 

7:30 

5:00 

5:00 

7:30 

7:30 

5:00 

5:00 

7:30 

5:00 

5:00 

7:30 

^:30 

7:30 

5:00 

^:30 

5:00 

10:00a.m. 



a.m. 
a.m. 



G-207 
G-216 
G-214 
G-208 
G-217 
G-206 
G-206 
G-216 
G-217 
G-208 



■208 
■216 
•111 
■208 
■215 
110 
■306 
■217 
G-217 
G-210 
G-109 
G-109 
G-109 
G-217 
G-308 
G-308 



Course Schedules — Spring Semester 109 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No.' No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



Bld| f 
Rn' 



201 65 A592 SpecialDiagTech 3 Staff 

202 65 A593 Clinicallnterviewing .... 3 Dr. Hauer 

203 65 A660 SemEdPsych 3 Staff 

204 65 A661 PracSchPsych 3 Dr. Shapiro 

205 65 A662 SchPsyExtnshp 3 Dr. Brower 



Wed 5:00 
Wed 5:00 
Mon 5:00 
Thurs 1 :00 
To Be Arranged 



G-2 
G-3 
G-2 
G-1 



3 



PANZER SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND HYGIENE 



206 73 

207 73 
208 
209 
210 



A408 

A413 

73 A502 

73 A526 

73 A528 



211 76 A555 

212 76 A557 

213 76 A577 



214 80 A401 

215 80 A410B 

216 80 A418 



217 81 A414 

218 81 A531 



219 82 AlOO 

220 82 A435 

221 82 A546 

222 82 A416 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

DriverEducation 3 Dr. Coder 

DrugAbuseProb 2 Dr. Hoitsma 

Sfty:Man&Envrnment .... 3 Staff 

CurrDevHlthEd 3 Dr. Redd . . 

EvaluationHealth 3 Dr. Hoitsma 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



.Mon 
. Mon 
.Wed 
. Thurs 
Tues 



SciAnalSp&PhyEd 3 

PrptlMotorLrngPE 3 

Admin&SupvPhyEd 3 



Dr. Horn Mon 

Dr. Redd Wed 

Dr. Wacker . . . Tues 



6:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

7:30 

5:00-7:30 

7:30 



7:30 
7:30 
7:30 



GENERAL SCIENCE 



TchgSciSecSch 3 

JrHiSchSciDem II 2 

3CentSciProg 3 



Mrs. Filas Thurs 7:30-10:00 

Mr. Placek Tues 7:30-9:10 

Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 



C-1 
P-C 
G-2 
P-C 
G-1 



P-C 
P-C 
P-C 



V-2 

V 

V-2 



;: 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

FldOrnithology 2 Dr. Kuhnen . . . Sat 8:30 a.m. F-2 

(Meet first Sat. of semester; other meetings by arrangement on Saturdays.) 

ComptvHumanAnat 4 Dr. Daniels ...Tues& 5:00-6:40 ¥-2 

Thurs 5:00-8:30 F 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

IntroChemistry 3 Dr. Ewart M&W 6:30-7:45 F-^ 

Biochemistry 4 Dr. Gallopo . . . Mon& 5:00-7:20 V 

Wed 5:00-9:10 V 

ChemSpectroscopy 3 Staff Wed 5:00-6:40 F-: 

NSFModChemistry II ... . 3 Dr. Ewart, Dr. 

Gallopo, Mr. Tues& 7:30-9:10 F-I 

Flynn Thurs 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS/EARTH SCIENCE 

223 84 AlOl PrinGeology 3 Mr. Ramsdell ..M&W 8:00-9:15 B-( 

224 84 A540 Geochemistry 3 Mr. Hamilton Tues 7:30-10:00 B-( 

SOCIAL SCIENCE COURSES 

225 90 A401 TchgSocStudSecSch 3 Staff Sat 8:30-11:10 C-? 

a.m. 

226 90 A410 NewpaperClssrm 2 Mr. Gricco Thurs 5:00-6:40 G-1 

(By invitation only) 

227 90 A603 SocStudResSem 2 Staff Sat 10:30 a.m. C-3 

(For students who plan to take the Comprehensive Examination in Octobe 

110 Course Schedules — Spring Semester 



,as. Dept. Course Sect, 
[o. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. 



Instructor 



Day 



Time 



Bidg. 
Rm. 



28 91 


A200 


29 91 


A461 


30 91 


A535 


31 92 


A200 


32 92 


A545 






33 93 


A200 


34 93 


A410 


35 93 


A412 






36 94 A112 


37 94 A118 


38 94 A122 


39 94 A123 


40 94 


A317 


41 94 


A421 


42 94 A436 


'43 94 


A511 


[44 94 A519 


45 94 


A531 


46 94 


A534 


47 95 


A401 


:48 95 


A406 


49 95 


A407 


,50 96 


A112 


51 96 A562 


52 96 A565 1 


53 96 


A565 2 


54 96 


A5^2 




DEP. 


55 97 


A531 


56 97 


A533 


57 97 

58 9^ 


A570 


A581B 



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY 

CuituralAnthro 3 Staff . M&W 

Ethnohistory 3 Staff . Wed 

Ethnology 1 3 Dr. Quintana Tues 

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 



8:00-9:15 
5:00-6:40 
■^: 30- 10: 00 



IntroEconomics 3 Staff Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 

EconLabor&Manpower ... 3 Dr. Kronish . Mon 5 :00 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

CuIturalGeog 3 Mrs. Hinshal- 

wood M&W 

UrbanGeog 3 Staff Mon 

GeogOf Africa 3 Mr. Ballwanz . . Wed 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 



SelTpcsAmHisl876 3 

DevClassicalCiv 3 

19thCentEurope 3 

ContemEurope 3 



BlackHistory 

Renaiss&Reformation 
AmerTransition . . . . 
OrgnsAmerCiv . . . 

USNuclearAge 

ModEastAsianHist . . 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
FranceRepub 3 



Mrs. DeBoer M&W 
Mrs. Gottsman M&W 

Mr. Bell Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Mr. Macaluso . Tu&Th 
Mr. Keenen . Tu&Th 
Dr. Royer Thurs 

Mr. Kops Wed 

Staff Mon 

Dr. Barker .... Tues 



DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 



ConstitutionalLaw 3 

Gov&PolMidEast 3 

Gov&PolUSSR 3 



Dr. Balfe Mon 

Dr. Johnson . . Mon 
Mr. Utete Tues 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 



SocioOfLeisure 3 

SocialChange 3 

SocioOfYouth 3 

SocioOfYouth 3 

SelProbSocio 3 



Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Mon 

Staff Wed 

Staff Thurs 

Staff Tues 



DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY 



AdvAudiology 3 

SupvSpch&HrngProg .... 3 

TchgSpchHrdHrn^ 2 

Meth&MatTchgChLrnDsb 3 



Staff Mon 

Staff Tues 

Staff Tues 

Staff Thurs 



C-316 
C-228 
C-228 



G-214 
S-101 



6:30-7:45 


G-214 


5:00 


G-215 


5:00 


S-101 


8:00-9:15 


F-105 


6:30-7:45 


G-209 


6:30-7:45 


G-118 


8:00-9:15 


F-105 


8:00-9:15 


G-315 


6:30-7:45 


G-214 


6:30-7:45 


G-307 


5:00 


C-228 


7:30 


S-101 


5:00 


F-106 


7:30 


S-101 



5:00 


C-228 


7:30 


S-101 


7:30 


G-314 


8:00-9:15 


C-117 


5:00 


G-111 


7:30 


S-102 


7:30 


S-101 


5:00 


C-228 



30 K-129 

30 K-129 

00-6:40 K-129 

30 K-129 



FIELS STUDIES 

)9 99 A406 PuertoRico&Virls 2 Staff April 2— April 10, 1971 



Course Schedules — Spring Semester 1 1 1 





DAILY SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 








SPRING SEMESTER, 1971 








Course No. Sec. 1 


^0. Course Title 


Instructor 


BIdg. & F 




Monday 4:00 P.M. 










125 30 301 


Reference and Bibliography I 
(Also meets Wednesday) 










(Meets February 1 to March 22) 


Miss Gibson . . . 


. . . . S-1 




126 30 302 


Reference and Bibliography II 
(Also meets Wednesday) 










(Meets March 24 to May 24) 


Miss Gibson . . . 


. . . . S-1 




173 60 A538 


Orchestra (Also meets Wednesday) .... 


Dr. Oneglia . . . 


. . . M-0 




Monday 5:00 P.M. 










008 11 A414 


Merchandising Mathematics 


Mrs. Sherdell . . 


. . . . C-3 




022 15 A503 1 


Methods of Research 


Staff 


... H-0 




028 15 A508 


Measurement and Evaluation II 


Dr. Lang 


... H-0 




037 15 A531 


Middle School Curriculum and 










Organization 

Contemporary Educational Thought 


Mr. Cuff 


.. . . F-1 




044 15 A548 


Dr. Haas 


... G-1 




053 15 A569 


Production of A-V Materials: Part II, 






«d 




Projected A-V Materials 


Mr. Ruezinsky . 


. . . . C-1 




069 15 A607 


Field Work and Practicum in Social Work 


Dr. Williams . . 


. . . G-2 




089 20 A543 


Contemporary American Literature 


Dr. Healey 


. ... G-1 




098 24 A302 


Foundations of Method in Art Education . . 


Mrs. Geiss .... 


. . . . L-1 




104 24 A521A, 


Sculpture 


StaflF 


... L-1 




B, C, or D 










128 05 102 


Swahili II (Also meets Wednesday) .... 


Mr. Ngari .... 


... G-3 




129 06 A425 


Methods and Materials of TESL 


Mrs. Susi 


. . . G-3 




138 46 A505 


History of the Spanish Language 


Mr. Gloeckner . 


... G-3 




147 50 A450X 


Foundations of Geometry 


Mr. Gugel .... 


... V-1 




154 50 A560 


Numerical Analysis I 


Mr. Mutter .... 


. . . . V-1 




162 60 462 


Music in Therapy 


Staff 


... M-0 




169 A521C 


Classroom Methods: Woodwind 










Instruments 


Mr. Shadel .... 


... M-0 




184 65 A550 


Quantitative and Statistical Methods 


Dr. Haupt .... 


. . G-2 




192 65 A566 


Psychology and Education of the Gifted . . 


Dr. Shapiro . . . 


... G-2 




203 65 A660 


Seminar in Educational Psychology 


Staff 


... G-2 




207 73 A413 


The Drug Abuse Problem 


Dr. Hoitsma . . . 


. . . . P-0 




220 82 A435 


Biochemistry (Meets Monday 5:00-7:20 










and Wednesday 5:00-9:10 p.m.) 


Dr. Gallopo . . . 


... V-3 




232 92 A545 


Economics of Labor and Manpower 


Dr. Kronish . . . 


. . . . S-1 




234 93 A410 


Urban Geography 


Staff 


... G-2 




245 94 A531 


Modern East Asian History 


Staff 


... F-1 




247 95 A401 


Constitutional Law 


Dr. Balfe .... 


... C-2 




251 96 A562 


Social Change 


Staff 


... G-1 




Monday 6:30 P.M. 










001 10 A202 


Accounting II (Also meets Wednesday) . . 


Staff 


... C-3 


1 


075 20 A105 1 


Composition and Literature I 










(Also meets Wednesday) 


Staff 


... G-2 




077 20 A106 1 


Composition and Literature II 










(Also meets Wednesday) 


Mr. Paul 


. . . G-1 




080 20 A418 


English Language: History, Grammar, and 










Linguistics I (Also meets Wednesday) . . . 


Staff 


... G-1 




112 Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 









Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



094 21 A204 

100 24 A413 

114 28 A351 
118 28 A443 
136 46 A103 

141 49 AlOOB 

143 50 A103 
H 206 73 A408 
219 82 AlOO 
233 93 A200 
237 94 A118 

onday 7:30 P.M. 

003 10 A421 

015 15 A420 

017 15 A424 

019 15 A436 



020 
027 
033 



15 A451 
15 A504 
15 A517 



040 15 A540 
058 15 A580 
090 20 A546 
121 28 A508 

148 50 A470 

150 50 A526 
171 60 A539 

178 65 A510 
186 65 A560 
198 65 A578 
211 76 A555 

248 95 A406 
255 97 A531 

londay 8:00 P.M. 
079 20 A354 

092 21 AlOO 

131 41 AlOOB 



Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Art of the Twentieth Century 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Plastics Molding and Forming I 

Wood Technology 

Spanish Grammar and Composition 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Beginning Italian II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

The Development of Mathematics 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Driver Education (Meets 6:30-10:00 p.m.) 
(Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor) . . 
Introductory Chemistry 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Cultural Geography 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Development of Classical Civilization 
(Also meets Wednesday) 



Investments 

Instructional Innovations 

Teacher, School, and Society 

Curriculum and Methods of Sex Education . 

Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 

Action Research for Teachers 

Systems Analysis in Education 

Supervision I 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling . . . 
Seminar in American Writers: Faulkner . . 
Problems in Organizing and Teaching 
Cooperative Industrial Education Programs 
Teaching of Mathematics — 

Senior High School 

Complex Variables II 

Master Class in Musical Performance: 

German Vocal Literature 

Research Methods in Psychology 

Advanced Educational Psychology 

Psychological Tests and Measurements .... 
Scientific Analysis of Sport and Physical 

Education Aaivities 

Government and Politics of the Middle East 
Advanced Audiology 



Staff 



A-101 



Dr. Kampf L-209 

Mr. Olsen F-223 

Mr. Schumm F-118 

Staff G-309 

Mr. Battista G-314 

Staff F-105 

Dr. Coder C-117 

Dr. Ewart F-204 

Mrs. Hinshalwood .. G-214 

Mrs. Gottsman .... G-209 



Dr. Haas C-310 

Staff C-304 

Staff G-109 

Dr. Runden G-215 

Mrs. Gaeng H-004 

Staff F-104 

Dr.Merlo S-102 

Dr.Peckham G-110 

Staff G-111 

Mr. Roberts G-206 

Staff F-106 

Mr. Walsh V-161 

Mr.McConnell V-163 

Dr. Wilkes M-015 

Dr. Haupt G-208 

Dr. Seymour G-216 

Dr. Duryea G-217 

Dr. Horn P-005 

Dr. Johnson S-101 

Staff K-129 



Shakespeare's Major Plays 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff G-115 

Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff A-101 

Beginning French II 

(Also meets Wednesday) Staff G-309 

Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 113 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & ! ^ 



132 41 A200B 
142 49 A200B 

174 63 A270 

175 65 AlOO 
177 65 A200 
223 84 AlOl 
228 91 A200 
236 94 A112 

Tuesday 9:00 A.M. 

196 65 A576 
Tuesday 4:00 P.M. 

127 30 303 

171 60 A536 
Tuesday 5:00 P.M. 
002 10 A409X 
006 10 A514 

023 15 A503 
031 15 A511 
034 15 A520 
042 15 A541 
046 15 A553 

057 15 A577 

059 15 A580 

084 20 A471 

095 21 A471 

105 24 A531A, 
B, C or D 

108 26 A424 

123 29 A421 

134 41 A532 

139 46 A521 

155 50 A565 

157 50 A574 

168 60 A514 

180 65 A540 

188 65 A561 

218 81 A531 



254 96 A572 
257 97 A570 



Intermediate French II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Intermediate Italian II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

History of Religion 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

General Psychology 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Educational Psychology 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Principles of Geology 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Cultural Anthropology 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Selected Topics in American History 
Since 1876 (Also meets Wednesday) . . . 

Projective Techniques II 

Fundamentals of Cataloging and 
Classification (Also meets Thursday) . . . 
Band (Also meets Thursday) 

Consumer Economics 

Improvement of Instruction in 

Typewriting and Clerical Practice 

Methods of Research 

School Business Administration 

Secondary School Administration 

Supervision in Special Fields 

Techniques of Reading Improvement in 

the Secondary Schools 

Social Case Work 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling . . 
Teaching English in the Secondary School 

Advanced Acting 

Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture 

Workshop in Home Economics — 

Teaching Sex Education 

Curriculum Construction in Vocational- 
Technical Education 

18 th Century French Theater 

The Novel of the Golden Age 

Ordinary Differential Equations II 

Problem Analysis in Secondary 

Mathematics 

Counterpoint 

Remediation of Basic Skills 

Developmental Psychology 

Comparative Human Anatomy 

(Meets Tuesday 5:00-6:40 p.m. and 
Thursday 5:00-8:30 p.m.) 

Selected Problems in Sociology 

Teaching Speech to the Hard of Hearing . 



Staff G-3 

Mr. Battista G-3' 

Mr. Streetman G-1 

Staflf G-2 

Staff G-2 

Mr. Ramsdell B-C 

Staff C-3I 

Mrs. DeBoer F-lj 

Dr. Kraemer G-1 



Miss Chesnut S-1 

Mr. Shadel M-C 



k 



Staff 



C-3 



Dr. Kahn C-2 

Staff H-C 

Dr. Merlo S-l 

Staff H-C 

Mr. Cuff C-1 

Mr. Brunner C-1 

Mr. Millard G-1 

Mr. Mills G-1 

Mrs. Becker G-1 

Dr. Rockwood .... K-^ 
Mr. McCreath L-1 



Staff 



F-l 



Mr. VanBenschoten . F-l 

Staff G-t 

Dr. Barbeito G-; 

Dr. Chai V-1 

Mr. Garfunkel V-1 

Mr. Girt M-( 

Staff G-: 

Dr. Koppel G-4 

Dr. Daniels F-i 



Staff 
Staff 



01 

K-l 



114 Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Staff 
Staff 



C-310 
G-115 



sday 6:30 P.M. 
010 11 A418 Retail Store Management 

( Also meets Thursday) 

081 20 A432 Medieval Literature (Also meets Thursday) 

093 21 AlOO 2 Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Thursday) 

09^ 24 AlOO Introduction to the Visual Arts 

115 28 A361 Industrial Metals 

1 17 28 A434 Offset Lithography 

135 46 AlOOB Beginning Spanish II 

(Also meets Thursday) 

144 50 A104 Mathematics of Personal Finance 

(Also meets Thursday) 

1~6 65 AlOO 2 General Psychology (Also meets Thursday) 
216 80 A418 Three Centuries of Science Progress 

(Also meets Thursday) 

238 94 A122 Nineteenth Century Europe, 1815-1914 

(Also meets Thursday) 

241 94 A421 Renaissance and Reformation 

(Also meets Thursday) 

242 94 A436 America in Transition 

(Also meets Thursday) 



Staff A-101 

Mr. deLeeuw L-229 

Staff F-119 

Mr. Atkins F-117 

Staff G-309 

Mr.Koegel F-105 

Staff G-216 

Staff V-258 

Mr. Bell G-118 

Mr. Macaluso G-214 

Mr. Keenan G-307 



sday 7:30 P.M. 
005 10 A502 



013 
032 
041 
045 

056 
064 



15 A405 
15 A516 
15 A540 
15 A551N 

15 A573 
15 A589 



Evaluation of Current Literature in 

Business Education Dr. Nanassy C-316 

Supervised Teaching Seminar Staff G-210 

School Finance Dr. Merlo S-102 

Supervision I Staff H-004 

Administration and Supervision of 

Reading Programs Mrs. Ward C-109 

Curriculum for Environmental Education Dr. Ambry G-109 

Student Personnel Services in 

Higher Education Dr. Davis G-110 



065 15 A591 
088 20 A526A 
101 24 A419 A, 
B, C, or D 
124 29 A471 



145 50 A426X 
149 50 A520 
170 60 A525 
179 65 A521 
191 65 A565 

199 65 A582 
210 73 A528 
213 76 A577 

215 80 A410B 
222 82 A416 



Education in Latin America Mr. Bernstein F-104 

Theory of the Novel Mr. Rich G-215 

Life Drawing Staff L-230 



Vocational-Technical In-Service 
Supervised Teaching Seminar 

(Meets entire year) 

Advanced Calculus II 

Set Theory 

An Ethnological Approach to Music .... 

Proseminar in Psychology II 

Psychology and Education of Socially and 

Emotionally Handicapped Children 

Behavior Modification 

Evaluation in Health 

Administration and Supervision in 

Physical Education 

Jr. High School Science Demonstrations II 
Modern Chemistry II ( NSF students only) 
(Also meets Thursday) 



Mr. VanBenschoten F-226 

Mr. Wolff V-163 

Mr. Stevens V-161 

Mr. Wilt M-013 

Staff G-2n 

Mrs. Litovsky G-306 

Staff G-308 

Dr. Hoitsma G-111 

Dr. Wacker P-005 

Mr. Placek V-265 

Dr. Ewart, Dr Gallopo, 

Mr. Flynn F-204 



Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 115 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & I 



224 84 A540 
230 91 A535 
246 94 A534 
249 95 A407 
256 97 A533 



Tuesday 8:00 P.M. 

009 11 A417 
076 20 A105 



078 20 
082 20 
137 46 
161 60 
231 92 

239 94 

240 94 
250 96 



A106 

A441 

A200B 

A426 

A200 

A123 

A317 
A112 



Wednesday 4:00 P.M. 

125 30 301 

126 30 302 
173 60 A538 



Wednesday 5:00 P.M. 


012 


11 A521 


029 


15 A510 1 


038 


15 A532 1 


052 


15 A567 


054 


15 A570 


063 


15 A586 


072 


15 A650 


073 


15 A659 


083 


20 A454 


128 


05 102 


130 


40 A401 


151 


50 A527 


153 


50 A544 


160 


60 A408 


163 


60 464 



Geochemistry Mr. Hamilton B-0 

Ethnology I Dr. Quintana C-2 

France of the Republics Dr. Barker S-1 

Government and Politics of the U.S.S.R. . . Mr. Utete G-3 

Supervision of Speech and 

Hearing Programs Staff K 



Marketing (Also meets Thursday) 
Composition and Literature I 
(Section II) (Also meets Thursday) 



. . Staff C-3 

. . Staff A-1 



k 

0( 



Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff Qrt 

Modern Poetry: French Symbolists to 

T. S. Eliot (Also meets Thursday) Staff G-1 

Intermediate Spanish II 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff G-| 

Survey of Music Literature 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff M-C 

Introduction to Economics 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff G-2 

Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present 

(Also meets Thursday) Staff F-1 

Black History (Also meets Thursday) .... Staff G-5 

Sociology of Leisure Staff C-1 

(Also meets Thursday) 



Reference and Bibliography I 
(4:00-5:40) (Also meets Monday) 

(Meets February 1 to March 22) Miss Gibson S-1 

Reference and Bibliography II 
(4:00-5:40) (Also meets Monday) 

(Meets March 24 to May 24) Miss Gibson S-1 

Orchestra (Also meets Monday) Dr. Oneglia M-Cldiie! 



Development of a Distributive 

Educational Curriculum Dr. Hecht C- 

Educational Administration I Dr. Mosier H- 

Principles of Curriculum Development . . . Staff F- 

Television Programming Seminar Staff C 

Counseling Adults Mr. Mills G- 

Elementary School Guidance Services . . . Dr. Gelfond G- 

Research Seminar and Thesis Writing . . . Dr. Davis H- 

Research Seminar in Reading Miss Schantz C- 

Film and Society Dr. Earley L- 

Swahili II (Also meets Monday) Mr. Ngari G- 

The Teaching of Foreign Languages in 

Secondary Schools Mrs. Knecht G- 

Functional Analysis I Dr. Parzynski .... V- 

Mathematical Statistics II Mr. Dick V- 

Chamber Music Mr. Wilt M- 

Psychological Foundations of Music II . . Staff Mr 



116 Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



Bidg. & Rm. 



181 65 A541 

187 65 A560 2 

201 65 A592 

202 65 A593 

220 82 A435 

221 82 A546 
229 91 A461 
235 93 A412 

ednesday 6:30 P.M. 

001 10 A202 

075 20 A105 1 

077 20 A106 1 

080 20 A418 

094 21 A204 

100 24 A413 

112 28 A270 

136 46 A103 

141 49 AlOOB 

143 50 A103 

219 82 AlOO 

233 93 A200 

237 94 A118 

ednesday 7:30 P.M. 

004 10 A435 

Oil 11 A422 

014 15 A408 

016 15 A423 

018 15 A424 2 

024 15 A503 3 

035 15 A530 1 

061 15 A582 

066 15 A601E 

087 20 A524 

096 21 A566 

103 24 A511A, 
B, C, or D 

120 28 A503 



Curriculum Development and Methods 

of Teaching Children Mrs. Litovsky G-206 

Advanced Educational Psychology Staff G-111 

Special Diagnostic Techniques Staff G-208 

Clinical Interviewing Dr. Hauer G-308 

Biochemistry (Also meets Monday) Dr. Gallopo V-360 

Chemical Spectroscopy Staff F-206 

Ethnohistory Staff C-228 

The Geography of Africa Mr. Ballwanz S-101 



Staff 



C-316 



G-207 



Accounting II (Also meets Monday) . 
Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Monday) StaflF 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Monday) Mr. Paul G-115 

English Language: History, Grammar 

and Linguistics I (Also meets Monday) . . StaflF G-118 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

(Also meets Monday) StaflF A-101 

Art of the Twentieth Century 

(Also meets Monday) Dr. Kampf L-209 

Foundations of Industry — Electronics .... StaflF F-225 

Spanish Grammar and Composition 

(Also meets Monday) StaflF G-309 

Beginning Italian II 

(Also meets Monday) Mr. Battista G-314 

The Development of Mathematics 

(Also meets Monday) StaflF F-105 

Introductory Chemistry 

(Also meets Monday) Dr. Ewart F-204 

Cultural Geography 

(Also meets Monday) Mrs Hinshalwood . . G-214 

Development of Classical Civilization 

(Also meets Monday) Mrs. Gottsman .... G-209 



Unit Record Equipment I 

Visual Merchandising 

Seleaion and Utilization of A-V 

Materials 

Teaching in the Urban Schools 

Teacher, School, and Society 

Methods of Research 

Curriculum Construction in the Secondary 

School 

Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information 

Workshop in Education: Psychology-Sex 

Education 

Comtemporary British Literature 

Costume and Make-up for the Stage 

Painting 



StaflF C-108 

Dr. Hecht C-310 

StaflF C-304 

Mr. Millard F-104 

StaflF G-109 

Dr. Heiss H-003 

StaflF H-004 

StaflF G-208 

Dr. Runden G-215 

Mr. Reaske G-IU 

Mr. Sobolik A-102 

StaflF L-225 



History and Contemporary Industrial 

Arts Literature Dr. Frankson 



F-106 



Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 117 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. 






146 50 A433 

182 65 A545 

183 65 A549 
190 65 A563 
208 73 A502 
212 76 A557 

244 94 A519 
252 96 A565 1 

Wednesday 8:00 P.M. 
079 20 A354 

092 21 AlOO 1 

131 41 AlOOB 

132 41 A200B 
142 49 A200B 

174 63 A270 

175 65 AlOO 1 
177 65 A200 

223 84 AlOl 
228 91 A200 
236 94 A112 

Thursday 9:00 A.M. 
197 65 A576 2 

Thursday 1:00 P.M. 
204 65 A661 

Thursday 4:00 P.M. 
048 15 A557 
127 30 303 

172 60 A536 

Thursday 5:00 P.M. 
007 10 A603 
036 15 A530 2 

043 15 A545 
050 15 A564 
060 15 A580 3 

067 15 A603 

068 15 A604 

086 20 0519B 



Theory of Numbers 

Seminar: Emotionally Disturbed Children 

Psychology of the Adult Learner 

Theories of Learning 

Safety — ^Man and Environment 

Perpetual Motor Learning in Physical 

Education 

The United States in the Nuclear Age . 
Sociology of Youth 



Mr. Walsh V-l( 

Mrs. Litovsky .... G-2 

Staff G-2 

Staff G-1 

Staff G-21 



Dr. Redd P.0» 

Mr. Kops S-llf 

Staff S-1' 



Shakespeare's Major Plays 

(Also meets Monday) 

Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Monday) 

Beginning French II 

(Also meets Monday) 

Intermediate French II 

(Also meets Monday) 

Intermediate Italian II 

(Also meets Monday) 

History of Religion 

(Also meets Monday) 

General Psychology 

(Also meets Monday) 

Education Psychology 

(Also meets Monday) 

Principles of Geology 

(Also meets Monday) 

Cultural Anthropology 

(Also meets Monday) 

Selected Topics in American History 
Since 1876 (Also meets Monday) . . 



Staff 


. . G-1 


Staff 


. . A-1 


Staff 


.. G-3 


Staff 


. . G-3 


Mr. Battista . . . . 


.. G-3 


Mr. Streetman . . 


. . G-1 


Staff 


. . G-2 


Staff 


.. G-2 


Mr. Ramsdell . 


.. B-C 


Staff . 


. . C-3 


Mrs. DeBoer . . . 


. . . F-1 



Projective Techniques II Dr. Kraemer 



G-1 



Practicum in School Psychology 



Corrective and Remedial Reading: Part 2 
Fundamentals of Cataloging and 
Classification (Also meets Tuesday) . . . 
Band II (Also meets Tuesday) 



Reasearch Seminar in Business Education . 
Curriculum Construction in the 

Secondary School 

Social Forces in Education 

Dynamics of Group Process 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling . . 
Principles and Practices of Research . . . . 
Field Work and Practicum in Guidance 

and Counseling 

Myth: Theory and Practice in Literature . . 



Dr. Shapiro G-1 



Miss Schantz .... C-] 

Miss Chesnut S-] 

Mr. Shadel H-( 



Dr. Nanassy C-: 

Staff H-( 

Mrs. Bredemeier . . G-. 

Dr. Gorman G-i 

Dr. Kenyon F- 

Dr. Heiss H-l 

Dr. Gregg and 

Dr. Gelfond F- 

Mrs. Barrett G- 






118 Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 



Course No. Sec. 


106 24 A550A, 
B, C or D 
109 26 A511 
133 41 A525 
140 46 A542 
152 50 A532 
156 50 A570 


159 60 
185 65 
194 65 
200 65 

209 73 


261 

A553 

A568 

A590 

A526 


218 


81 


A531 


226 


90 


A410 


243 


94 


A511 


Thursday 6:30 P.M. 
010 11 A418 


081 


20 A432 


093 


21 


AlOO 2 


113 
119 
135 


28 
28 


A280 
A496 
AlOOB 


144 


50 


A104 


176 


65 


AlOO 2 


216 


80 A418 


238 94 A122 


241 


94 A421 


242 


94 A436 


Thursday 
025 
030 
047 
051 


7: 
15 
15 
15 
15 


30 P.M. 

A503 4 
A510 2 
A555 
A565 


055 
062 


15 
15 


A572 
A585 


074 
091 
099 


15 A678 
20 A603 
24 A406A 
B, C or D 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Silk Screen Printing Mr. Vernacchia 



L-228 



Contemporary Issues in Home Economics 

French Classicism 

Spanish American Novel XX Century . . 

Abstract Algebra II 

Administration and Supervision of 

Mathematics 

Introduction to Music Therapy II 

Urban Psychology 

Psychology of Group Dynamics 

Diagnostic Case Studies I 

Curriculum Development in Health 

Education 

Comparative Human Anatomy 

(Meets Tuesday 5 : 00-6: 40 p.m. and 
Thursday 5:00-8:30 p.m. and 

Newspaper in the Classroom 

(By invitation only) 

Origins of American Civilization, 

1607-1763 



Retail Store Management 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Medieval Literature 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Foundations of Industry — Power 

Jewelry Making and Lapidary 

Beginning Spanish II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Mathematics of Personal Finance 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

General Psychology 

(Also meets Tuesday) .... 

Three Centuries of Science Progress 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Nineteenth Century Europe, 1815-1914 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Renaissance and Reformation 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

America in Transition 

(Also meets Tuesday) 



Methods of Research 

Educational Administration I 

Case Studies in Reading: Part 2 

Consultation in Organizational 

Development 

Conservation Education 

Group Guidance and Counseling 

Activities 

Techniques of Evaluation 

English Research Writing 

Photography: A Contemporary Art Form 



Dr. Sanford F-112 

Staff G-315 

Dr. Rivera-Rivera . . G-314 

Mr. Kalmanson . V-l6l 

Mr. Walsh V-163 

Staff M-011 

Dr. Williams ... G-208 

Dr. Brown G-210 

Dr. Seymour .... G-308 

Dr. Redd P-005 

Dr. Daniels F-217 



Mr. Grieco G-110 

Dr. Royer C-228 

Staflf C-310 

StaflF G-115 

Staff A-lOl 

Mr. Teryek F-219 

Mr. Dorner F-118 

Staff G-309 

Mr. Koegel F-105 

Staff G-216 

Staff V-258 

Mr. Bell G-118 

Mr. Macaluso .... G-214 

Mr. Keenan G-307 

Dr. Heiss H-003 

Dr. Ambry H-004 

Mrs. Ward C-109 

Dr. Gorman G-207 

Staff G-109 

Dr. Gregg G-110 

Dr. Gelfond S-102 

Mr. Pettegrove . . G-206 

Mr. Kyle L-131 



Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 119 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



102 24 A423 

107 24 A590 

110 26 A540 

189 65 A561 

193 65 A567 

214 80 A401 

222 82 A416 

253 96 A565 

258 97 A581B 



Thursday 8:00 P.M. 
009 11 A417 
076 20 A105 

078 20 A106 

082 20 A441 

137 46 A200B 

161 60 A426 

231 92 A200 

239 94 A123 

240 94 A317 
250 96 A112 

Friday 10:00 A.M. 
195 65 A573 



Teaching of Art History to Grades K-12 . . Staff L-108 

Modern Philosophies of Art Dr. Kampf L-209 

Child in the Family Mrs. Silver F-106 

Developmental Psychology Staff G-215 

Abnormal Psychology Dr. Sugarman .... G-217 

The Teaching of Science in the 

Secondary Schools Mrs. Filas V-265 

Modern Chemistry II (Also meets Dr. Ewart, Dr. Gallopo, 

Tuesday) (N.S.F. students only) Mr. Flynn F-204 

Sociology of Youth Staff S-101 

Methods and Materials in Teaching 

Children with Learning Disabilities .... Staff K-129 



Marketing (Also meets Tuesday) Staff C-310 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff A-101 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff G-115 

Modern Poetry: French Symbolists to 

T. S. Eliot (Also meets Tuesday) Staff G-118 

Intermediate Spanish II 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff G-309 

Survey of Music Literature 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff M-015 

Introduction to Economics 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff G-214 

Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff F-105 

Black History (Also meets Tuesday) .... Staff G-315 

Sociology of Leisure 

(Also meets Tuesday) Staff C-117 



Physiological Psychology 



Miss Garcia G-109 



Saturday 8:30 A.M. 

021 15 A501 
070 15 A619 

217 81 A414 



225 90 A401 



Saturdays 10:30 A.M. 
026 15 A503 



039 15 A532 

085 20 A513 

111 26 A603 

158 50 A575 

227 90 A603 



Tests and Measurements in Education . . . Dr. Lang H-003 

Seminar in Administration: Supervision 

Curriculum Dr. Peckham .... C-228 

Field Ornithology (Meet first Saturday 
of semester; other meetings by arrange- 
ment on Saturdays.) Dr. Kuhnen F-210 

The Teaching of Social Studies in 

Secondary Schools Staff C-316 



5 Methods of Research Dr. Lang H-003 

2 Principles of Curriculum Development . . Staff C-228 

The Renaissance in Europe Dr. McGee G-109 

Advanced Studies in Home Economics . . . Miss Ruslink .... F-112 

Selected Topics in Mathematics (NSF 

students only) Mr. Garfunkel .... V-154 

Social Studies Research Seminar 

(For students who plan to take the Staff C-310 

Comprehensive Examination in October. ) 



120 Schedule of Classes — Spring Semester 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

A. PURCHASE OF PARKING DECALS 

1. During the process of registration, students who intend to park on campus will be required to fill out a 
vehicle registration form. At that time appropriate decals may be purchased. The charge will be $10.00 
for decals purchased in the Fall or Spring (valid for Fall, Spring, and Summer) and $5.00 for decals pur- 
chased in the Summer (valid for Summer only). 

2. All decals are based on a one-year period beginning September 1 and terminating August 31. Traffic and 
Parking Regulations are in effect 24 hours a day. 

3. Students who wish to drive more than one auto may obtain a second decai. The second and any additional 
decal may be purchased for $1.00 but the student must register both autos under his name and under no 
condition may both vehicles be parked on the campus at the same time. Non-compliance with these con- 
ditions will constitute a violation and will be subject to fine according to the regulations below. 

B. PURCHASE OF DECALS 

1. Requests for decals will be honored only upon the presentation of accurate information about the license 
number, description and ownership of the vehicle. 

2. Decals are not transferable and must be removed in the event of: 

a. Change of ownership. 

b. Termination of association with the college. 

c. Termination of authorized period for which decal was issued. 

3. An appropriate decal shall be displayed on the left rear, side window of all student vehicles on or before 
the first day of classes each term. 

C PARKING REGULATIONS 

Failure to observe any of the following regulations shall constitute a violation which will be processed 
according to the provisions under "VIOLATIONS". 

1. Autos must properly display a current decal only. (Decals must be affixed according to the instructions 
on the back of the decal.) 

2. Autos must be parked in observance of the following zones: 

a. Faculty parking only (posted signs and/or large "F" stenciled on pavement) for cars diplaying faculty 
and staff decals (effective 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). 

b. Visitor parking only (posted). A visitor is considered to be a person who is not employed by the 
college or registered with the college. 

c. Regular parking (unmarked spaces) for cars displaying appropriate decals as described above. 

3. Autos parked under any of the following conditions are subject to a fine according to provisions under 
"VIOLATIONS". 

a. In "No Parking" areas which are posted or marked on the curbing. 

b. On lawns cultivated grass areas. 

c. In front of or obstructing driveways, crosswalks or delivery areas. 

d. Within the regular parking areas but in such a way as to impede traffic. 

e. Over or on the lines of the designated parking spaces. 
Regulations pertaining to moving violations: 

a. Exceeding the posted speed limit of 15 miles per hour. 

b. Failure to observe stop signs. 

4. Overnight parking is not permitted. Any exception to this rule must be requested through the Traffic 
Coordinator's office. 

5. In case of snow storms all personnel at the College must remove their cars from the Campus so that 
efficient snow removal may be affected. 

6. Accidents: A report of all accidents involving motor vehicles on college property is to be sent to the 
Traffic Coordinator at the earliest possible moment. 

7. Illegally parked vehicles without decals belonging to friends or relatives of students wilt automatically 
make students responsible for their tickets amounting to three or more. 

D. VIOLATIONS 

Any infractions of the regulations as contained herein will constitute a violation and will be disposed of 
as follows: 

1. A sum of $5.00 payable at the Traffic Coordinator's Office will be charged for each violation. 

2. More than five infractions will jeopardize the students standing with the college. 

3. Students may appeal violations to the Student Appeal Board. 

4. Montclair State College will withhold the grades and/or deny registration to any student who has failed 
to dispose of outstanding violations. 

5. "Violators of parking regulations will be subject to towing and removal of their automobiles. Costs of 
such towing shall be paid in addition to fines." 



124 Parking and Traffic Regulations 




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MONTCLAIR 

STATE COLLEGE 

Upper Montclair, New Jersey 




1971-7. 

Ml I ^ 

' Spring 



EVENING 
DIVISION 



aHHomecmcm 



graduate Ji undergraduate 



/nr^x .- ; rt^-;?g?r'ig.v\f\iv^-''i^ -v^ 



EVENING DIVISION CALENDAR 1971-1972 
Fall Semester (97f Class Schedule 



JULY 26-AUGUST 20 

Mail registration. See page 27. 
SEPTEMBER 7 and 8 

Registration with late registration 

through September 11. Mail registration 

will precede these dates. 
SEPTEMBER 9 

Classes begin. 

Comprehensive Examinations. (See 

page 15.) 
OCTOBER 13 

End of the first third of the semester. 
NOVEMBER 3 

Midpoint of the semester. 
NOVEMBER 15 

Last day to file for June M.A. Degree 

Conferment. 
NOVEMBER 25 through 28 

Thanksgiving Recess. 
DECEMBER 23 through JANUARY 2 

Christmas Vacation. 
JANUARY 6 

Classes Resume. 
JANUARY 8 

Last day of classes— Fall Semester. 



MONDAYS 

September 13, 20, 27-October 4, 11, 18, 
25-November 1, 8, 15, 22, 29-December ! 
6, 13, 20. 

TUESDAYS 

September 14, 21, 28-October 5, 12, 19, 
26-November 2, 9, 16, 23, 30-December 
7,14,21. 

WEDNESDAYS 

September 15, 22, 29-October 6, 13, 20, 
27-November 3, 10, 17, 24-December 1, 
8,15,22. 

THURSDAYS 

September 9, 16, 23, 30-October 7, 14, 
21, 28-November 4, 11, 18-December 2, 
9, 16-January 6. 

SATURDAYS 

September 11, 18, 25-October 2, 9, 16, 
23, 30-November 6, 13, 20-December 4, 
11, 18-January 8. 



I 



Spring Semester 1972 Class Schedule 



NOVEMBER 29-DECEMBER 19 

Mail registration. See page 27. 
JANUARY 24 and 25 

Registration with late registration 

through January 29. Mail registration 

will precede these dates. 
JANUARY 31 

Classes begin. 
MARCH 4 

End of the first third of the semester. 
MARCH 

Comprehensive Examinations. (See 

page 15.) 
MARCH 15 

Last day to file for August M.A. Degree 

Conferment. 
MARCH 25 

Mid-point of the semester. 
MARCH 25 through APRIL 3 

Spring Recess. 
APRIL 4 

Classes Resume. 
MAY 22 

Last Day of Classes-Spring Semester. 
MAY 29 

Commencement. 
JULY 1 

Last day to file for January 1973 M.A. 

Degree Conferment. 



MONDAYS 

January 31-February 7, 14, 21, 28-March 
6, 13, 20-April 10, 17, 24-May 1, 8, 15, 22. 

TUESDAYS 

February 1, 8, 15, 22, 29-March 7, 14, 21- 
ApriU, 11, 18, 25-May 2, 9, 16. 

WEDNESDAYS 

February 2, 9, 16, 23-March 1, 8, 15, 22 
April 5, 12, 19, 26-May3, 10,17. 

THURSDAYS 

February 3, 10, 17, 24-March 2, 9, 16, 23- 
April6, 13, 20, 27-May4, 11,18. 

SATURDAYS 

February 5, 12, 19, 26-March 4, 11, 18, 25 
-April 8, 15, 22, 29-May 6, 13, 20. 



\ 



■vcHmg 'Division 



10NTCLAIR 

TATE 

OLLEGE 



Upper Montclair 
New Jersey 



Contents 
& Page 




<or4 



Undergraduate 

and Graduate 

Programs 

10-15 



Certification 

Information 

15-19 



Academic 

Regulations 

20-22 



General 

Information 

23-26 



\:t' \\ 



le./j- 



'allk Spring Semesters 



I 



1971-1972 



JUNE 1971 



^lume 64 



Number 2 



Registration 

Information 

27-34 



Course 

Offerings 

37-113 



Fall 
and Spring 
Schedules 
1 14-1 53 _ 



Parking 

and Traffic 

Regulations 

156 



HOW TO GET TO MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

Location 

Montclair State College is on Valley Road and Normal Avenue, Upper 
Montclair (Turn at the light). The College is one mile south of the junction 
of Route 3 and 46 on Valley Road. 

Directions For Reaching the College 

From Bloomfield Avenue, Montclair Center (Sear's store) proceed 
north on Valley Road— two miles to the Normal Avenue light. 

Heading East on Route 46, the landmark is West's Diner; take the 
next right, Valley Road— one mile to light at Normal Avenue. 

Heading West on Route 46, the landmark is the junction with Route 
3. Turn on Valley Road to Montclair, bear right on clover-leaf and pro- 
ceed south under Route 46— one mile to the light at Normal Avenue. 

From the Turnpike North of Exit 11 or South of George Washington 
Bridge turn at Route 3 West or Route 46 West, then as above. From the 
Turnpike South of Exit 11, leave the Turnpike at Exit 11 and follow direc- 
tions for Garden State Parkway North. 

Heading North on the Garden State Parkway, turn left at Exit 153B 
and proceed west on Route 3 to Valley Road. 

Heading South on the Garden State Parkway, turn at Route 46 West 
(Clifton Exit 154) then to Valley Road. If you miss that turn, continue 
South to Exit 151, Watchung Avenue, then west to Valley Road and North 
to light at Normal Avenue. 

The No. 60 Public Service Bus from Newark to Montclair terminates 
at the Southwest end of the campus. 

The No. 66 DeCamp Bus from New York, which leaves on the half 
hour from Platform 73, Port Authority Bus Terminal, stops at Valley Road 
and Mt. Hebron Road— one long block from the campus. 

The Erie Railroad, Montclair Heights Station, is at the Southwest cor- 
ner of the campus. 



WHEN IN DOUBT 

CALL 

893-4201-Area Code 201 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Montclair State College is fully accredited by the Middle States As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, and is also fully accredited 
by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education with the 
Master's Degree as the highest degree approved. 



STAT^ 




MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

Board of Trustees 

Dr. W. Lincoln Hawkins, Chairman Montclair 

Dr. Henry S. Dyer Princeton 

Dr. Edythe Jones Gaines Montclairj 

Bernard M. Hartnett, Jr Jersey City 

Mrs. Gladys Hunter Fair Haven 

Gerald A. LeBoff Teaneck 

Dallas Townsend Montclair* 

Dean William C. Warren, Vice Chairman Ridgewooc 

Dr. Raymond W. Young North Berger 

Dr. Thomas H. Richardson, Ex-Officio I 

1^ f, 

James W. Cottingham, Administrative Assistant to the Board of Trustees | | 
B.A., M.A., Montclair State College ![ 

I 



ADMINISTRATION 5 

COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas H. Richardson, Ed.D., LL.D President 

Allan Morehead, Ed.D Executive Vice President and Provost 

Walter L. Heilbronner, Ph.D Vice President for Academic Affairs 

Vincent B. Calabrese, M.Ed Vice President for Business and 

Financial Services 

Francesco Cordasco, Ed.D Assistant to the President 

M. Herbert Freeman, Ph.D Director of Graduate Studies 

I Lawton W. Blanton, M.A Dean of Students 

Laurence Bellegamba, Ed.D Dean, School of Education 

Samuel Pratt, Ph.D Dean, School of Fine and Performing Arts 

Wolfgang B. Fleischmann, Ph.D Dean, School of Humanities 

Irwin H. Gawley, Ed.D Dean, School of Mathematics and Sciences 

Houston G. Elam, Ph.D. . Dean, School of Professional Arts and Sciences 

Philip S. Cohen, Ph.D. . . Dean, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences 



Robert E. MacVane, M.Ed Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

Marshall A. Butler, M.A Associate Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

Maxine R. Bullard, B.A Assistant Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

Jerry T. Ice, M.A Assistant Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

Joseph A. Mauro, M.Ed Assistant Director of Evening Division and 

Summer Session 

Frank C. Erdman, B.S Evening Division Counselor 

M. Patricia Fries, M.A Counselor and Certification Advisor 

Sally B. Gavagan, B.S.L Evening Division Counselor 

Simone C. Picard, M.A Certification and M.A.T. Advisor 

Norman E. Lange, Ed.D. . . . Director of Student Teaching and Placement 

John R. Beard, D.L.S Head Librarian 

Emma Fantone, M.A Director, Media Center 



6 FACULTY 

FACULTY 
Fall and Spring Semesters — 1971-72 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Department of Educational Foundations and Comparative Studies 

Dr. Ronald Haas, Chairman Professor 

Mr. George Bernstein Assistant Professor 

Mrs. Mary E. Bredemeier Assistant Professor 

Dr. Francesco Cordasco Professor 

Mrs. Myrna A. Danzig Assistant Professor 

Dr. Lawrence Hamel Associate Professor 

Mr. Joseph Venturini Assistant Professor 

Department of Educational Leadership 

Dr. Earl K. Peckham, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Raymond Ast Associate Professor 

Dr. Laurence Bellagamba Professor 

Mr. William A. Cuff Associate Professor 

Dr. Bertram Lindeman Assistant Professor 

Dr. Frank P. Merlo Professor 

Dr. Earl E. Mosier Professor 

Dr. Thomas H. Richardson President and Professor 

Department of Educational Research & Evaluation 

Dr. Gerhard Lang, Chairman Professor 

Dr. George D. Heiss Associate Professor 

Department of Human Organizational Processes 

Dr. Alfred Gorman, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Donald B. Gregg Associate Professor 

Mr. Tete Tetens Assistant Professor 

Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

Dr. Ralph Walter, Chairman Professor 

Dr. J. C. McElroy Associate Professor 

Mr. Nicholas Michelli Assistant Professor j 

Dr. Charity Runden Professor , 

Mr. George E. Salt Associate Professor 

Mr. Robert Pines Assistant Professor 

Department of Personnel Services 

Dr. Earl C. Davis, Chairman Professor 

Mrs. Joan Gaeng Associate Professor 

Dr. Abraham Gelfond Professor! 

Mr. Richard Grey Assistant Professor! 

Dr. Lawrence B. Kenyon Professor! 

Mr. Thomas Millard Assistant Professoij 

Mr. Edwin Mills Assistant Professor' 

Mr. Robert B. Williams Associate Professor 



FACULTY 7 

Department of Special Instructional Areas 

Miss Maria Schantz, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Joseph Brunner Instructor 

Mr. John Donaruma Instructor 

Mrs. Ruth A. Ward Assistant Professor 

Department of Technology in Education 

Mr. Robert Ruezinsky, Chairman Instructor 

Mr. John Diglio Instructor 

SCHOOL OF FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS 

Department of Fine Arts 

Dr. Charles H. Martens, Chairman Professor 

Mr. John Czerkowicz Assistant Professor 

Mr. Leon deLeeuw Assistant Professor 

Mr. Jonathan Silver Assistant Professor 

Mr. Ralph Vernacchia Associate Professor 

Department of Music 

Dr. Benjamin F. Wilkes, Chairman Professor 

Mr. John Girt Assistant Professor 

Dr. Dorothy J. Morse Professor 

Dr. Jack Sacher, Jr Associate Professor 

Mr. Thomas Wilt Assistant Professor 

Department of Speech and Theater 

Dr. Howard Fox Professor 

Mr. W. Scott MacConnell Assistant Professor 

Mr. Donald Stoll Assistant Professor 

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

Department of English 

Dr. Sanford R. Radner, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Jack Barschi Associate Professor 

Dr. Steven C. L. Earley Professor 

Mrs. Marilyn Frignoca Instructor 

Dr. Frank B. Hanson Associate Professor 

Dr. E. Claire Healey Assistant Professor 

Dr. Barry Jacobs Associate Professor 

Dr. Morris G. McGee Associate Professor 

Dr. Anne R. Mickelson Assistant Professor 

Mr. Raymond Paul Assistant Professor 

Mr. James P. Pettegrove Professor 

Dr. George R. Petty Professor 

Mr. Theodore Price Assistant Professor 

Mr. Herbert E. Reaske Assistant Professor 

Mr. Morton D. Rich Assistant Professor 

Mr. John P. Roberts Associate Professor 

Dr. Marie F. Sabin Associate Professor 

Dr. Douglas M. Schwegel Associate Professor 



8 FACULTY 

Department of French 

Dr. Helene Klibbe, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Robert Glick Assistant Professor 

Mr. Robert H. Hinshalwood Assistant Professor 

Mrs. Madeleine Sergent Assistant Professor 

Dr. Lillian Szklarczyk Associate Professor 

Department of Spanish and Italian 

Mr. Italo Battista, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Clara Barbeito Assistant Professor 

Dr. Sara F. Prieto Assistant Professor 

Dr. Eloisa Rivera-Rivera Professor 

Department of Philosophy and Religion 

Dr. George BrantI, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Robert F. Streetman Instructor 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES 

Department of Biology 

Dr. S. Marie Kuhnen, Chairman Professor 

Mrs. Ophelia Gona Assistant Professor 

Mrs. Roslyn Kane Assistant Professor 

Dr. Leah Koditschek Associate Professor 

Dr. J. Michael McCormick Assistant Professor 

Dr. Paul Shubeck Associate Professor 

Department of Chemistry 

Dr. Thomas L. Wilson, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Joseph F. Becker Professor 

Dr. Roswell Ewart Assistant Professor 

Mr. Roland R. Flynn Associate Professor 

Dr. Andrew R. Gallopo Assistant Professor 

Dr. Richard Lynde Assistant Professor 

Mr. Albert Zabady Associate Professor 

Department of Mathematics 

Mr. Paul C. Clifford, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Carl Bredlau Assistant Professor 

Dr. Winchung A. Chai Assistant Professor 

Dr. Thomas Devlin Assistant Professor 

Mr. Andrew Demetropoulos Assistant Professor 

Mr. Robert Garfunkel Assistant Professor 

Mr. George H. Gugel Assistant Professor 

Dr. Samuel M. Haft Assistant Professor 

Mr. Marcoantonio Lacatena Assistant Professor 

Mr. Thomas McConnell Assistant Professor 

Dr. Evan M. Maletsky Professor; 

Mr. Gustov Mutter Assistant Professor! 

Mr. Gideon Nettler Assistant Professor 

Dr. Ellen Orfinger Assistant Professoi 

Dr. William R. Parzynski Assistant Professoi 

Dr. Max A. Sobel Professoi 

Mr. John Stevens Assistant Professoi 

J 



I 



FACULTY 9 

Dr. Ruth Stewart Associate Professor 

Mr. Walter R. Westphal Associate Professor 

Mr. Philip Zipse Assistant Professor 

Department of Physics and Geoscience 

Dr. Stephen W. Kowalski, Chairman Professor 

Mrs. Victoria Filas Assistant Professor 

Mr. Frank Kelland Assistant Professor 

Mr. Ben Minor Associate Professor 

Mr. Robert C. Ramsdell Associate Professor 

Dr. John V. Thiruvathukal Assistant Professor 

SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Department of Business Studies 

Albert D. Rossetti, Chairman Assistant Professor 

Dr. Joseph C. Hecht Professor 

Dr. Louis C. Nanassy Professor 

Mr. Phillip Stein Assistant Professor 

Miss Palmina A. Uzzolino Assistant Professor 

Department of Home Economics 

Dr. Katharine B. Hall, Chairman Professor 

Mrs. Huberta Alcaro Instructor 

Miss Judy Graef Instructor 

Miss Lois Guthrie Assistant Professor 

Mrs. Elizabeth "Kelley Instructor 

Mrs. Margaret Mukherjee Instructor 

Dr. Alan Rappaport Associate Professor 

Dr. Doris Ruslink Professor 

Mrs. Miriam Silver Instructor 

Department of Industrial Education and Technology 

Dr. Arthur W. Earl, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Robert J. Endres Instructor 

Dr. Arthur J. Rosser Associate Professor 

Mr. Raymond VanBenschoten Project Specialist 

Department of Health and Physical Education 

Dr. Richard W. Tews Professor 

Dr. Alden C. Coder Professor 

Dr. Harry H. Hoitsma Associate Professor 

Dr. George A. Horn Associate Professor 

Dr. Joan Schleede Associate Professor 

Mr. Reza Shahrokh Assistant Professor 

Dr. Joseph Toth Assistant Professor 

Dr. Hazel M. Wacker Professor 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

Department of Anthropology 

Dr. Betha B. Quintana, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Clarence T. Maloney Associate Professor 

Mrs. Marcha P. Tatkon Assistant Professor 



10 FACULTY 

Department of Economics 

Dr. Margaret Reilly, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Sidney J. Kronish Professor 

Department of Geography 

Mr. Bertrand P. Boucher, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Howard R. Ballwanz Assistant Professor 

Dr. Rolf Sternberg Assistant Professor 

Department of History 

Dr. Richard J. Barker, Chairman Professor 

Mr. John T. Bell Assistant Professor 

Mr. Walter E. Kops Associate Professor 

Mr. Peter F. Macaluso Assistant Professor 

Dr. Lois A. More Professor 

Mr. John Olenik Assistant Professor 

Dr. Helen E. Royer Professor 

Mr. Barry Shapiro Instructor 

Dr. Louis B. Zimmer Assistant Professor 

Department of Political Science 

Dr. Gilbert O. Hourtoule, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Harry Balfe Assistant Professor 

Dr. Edward W. Johnson Assistant Professor 

Mr. George Menake Assistant Professor 

Mr. Charles M. B. Utete Assistant Professor 

Department of Psychology 

Dr. John Seymour, Acting Chairman Assistant Professor 

Mr. Irwin Jay Badin Assistant Professor 

Dr. Daniel Brower Professor 

Dr. Martin Brown Professor 

Dr. Robert Cicerone Assistant Professor 

Dr. Richard D. Draper Associate Professor 

Dr. Walter R. Duryea Assistant Professor 

Mr. Glenn Firestone Instructor 

Dr. Lois G. Floyd Professor 

Dr. Mark Friedman Assistant Professor 

Miss Margarita Garcia Assistant Professor 

Mr. Ethan Gologor Assistant Professor 

Dr. Herbert J. Hauer Professor 

Dr. Edward J. Haupt Assistant Professor 

Miss Therese M. Herman Assistant Professor 

Dr. Mark A. Koppel Assistant Professor 

Dr. Doris R. Kraemer Assistant Professor 

Mrs. Clara Litovsky Instructor 

Dr. George S. Rotter Associate Professor 

Dr. Jerome M. Seidman Professor 

Dr. Abbie F. Shapiro Associate Professor 

Dr. Ira R. Sugarman Assistant Professor 

Dr. Daniel E. Williams Assistant Professor 

Dr. Peter F. Worms Associate Professor 



I 



FACU LTY 1 1 

Department of Sociology 

Dr. Byong-Suh Kim, Chairman Professor 

Dr. Barbara H. Chasin Assistant Professor 

Dr. Meredith B. McGuire Assistant Professor 

Dr. Emmanuel Thomas Associate Professor 

Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders 

Dr. Harold M. Scholl, Chairman Professor 

Mr. Gerard Caracciolo Assistant Professor 

Dr. Warren Heiss Associate Professor 

Mrs. Margaret Leahy Assistant Professor 

Dr. Gilbert Leight Professor 

Dr. Terry Schon Associate Professor 

Dr. Edward Shulman Professor 

Department of Library Science 

Miss Elsie Gibson Assistant Professor 



12 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES 

The Evening Division program is designed specifically to meet the needs 
of: 

1. Matriculated students enrolled in graduate programs \Nho wish to meet 
requirements for the Master of Arts degree. 

2. Teachers-in-service who desire to complete degree requirements, to 
improve their professional standing, or to take courses for state cer- 
tification purposes. 

3. Graduates from liberal arts colleges seeking certification to teach in 
the New Jersey public secondary schools. 

4. Persons interested in pursuing college work for cultural or vocational 
purposes whether or not they desire credit. 

5. Eligible persons interested in special workshops, institutes, and sem- 
inars. 

6. High School graduates interested in pursuing college study for pur- 
poses of attaining a Bachelors degree on a part time basis at Mont- 
clair State College through the Evening Division and Summer Session. 

ADMISSION TO EVENING DIVISION 

STUDENTS SEEKING ADMISSION TO MONTCLAIR PROGRAMS 
Evening Undergraduate Degree Programs— Bachelor of Arts 

This undergraduate program is designed for qualified graduates from 
accredited high schools or qualified transfer students from other colleges 
interested in pursuing college study on a part time basis in the evening 
for the degree. Courses are offered in the evening, leading to a Bachelor 
of Arts degree in the areas of Business Studies, English, Industrial Arts 
and History. 

Application Procedures for Admission to the Evening Division Program 

I. REQUIREMENTS AND PROCEDURES FOR PERMISSION 
TO BEGIN COURSE WORK 

A. U.S. citizenship or proof of eligibility. 

B. Graduation from an approved four-year high school or an equiv- 
alency diploma. 

C. File an application and supporting credentials with the Evening 
Division. Be sure to enclose the required $10.00 APPLICATION 
FEE. Send a check or money order, NO CASH, payable to MONT- 
CLAIR STATE COLLEGE. The necessary forms may be obtained 
in the Evening Division Office. 

D. Request your high school to send a TRANSCRIPT of your record 
directly to the Evening Division— Admissions. Please use the col- 
lege form. Your official high school transcript must show a mini- 
mum of 16 units, (a unit is a year's work in a subject). Included in 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 13 

the 16 units required for admission are English (4 units), Algebra 
(1 unit), Lab Science (1 unit), American History (PAD) (2 units), 
Foreign Language* (2 units), electives from above (3 units), Free 
Electives (3 units). If an applicant is deficient in any of the areas, 
he must arrange to complete the requirements by taking an ap- 
proved high school course and/or by passing the State Equival- 
ency Examination in the subject concerned. Applicants holding 
equivalency diplomas must submit official records shov\/ing the 
scores obtained on the General Equivalency Examinations. 

E. Students with prior college experience MUST submit transcripts 
from ALL institutions attended. Failure to do so will invalidate the 
application. Students who wish to transfer credit to Montclair must 
also complete the COURSE DESCRIPTION form. If the College 
Entrance Examination and/or interview are required of a student 
with prior college work, the student will be notified by this office. 

F. Have the PERSONAL REFERENCE forms completed and for- 
warded to the Evening Division— Admissions. 



It is the STUDENT'S RESPONSIBILITY to see that all credentials 
are filed in the Evening Division Undergraduate Office by: 

May 1 for Summer admission 

August 10 for Fall admission 

December 20 for Spring admission 

When all credentials have been received and evaluated, the student 
will be notified as to his eligibility or ineligibility to begin course work 
in the Evening Division. 



MATRICULATION INTO A DEGREE PROGRAM 

Items A &. B below may be completed at the applicant's earliest con- 
venience, but they MUST be completed before matriculation will be 
considered. 

A. Students who have not taken the S.A.T. examination may take an 
examination given by the College. The Evening Division Office 
must be advised in writing of your intent soon after you have re- 
ceived permission to begin work at Montclair State College. 

B. Submit a MEDICAL REPORT signed by a physician. Use the form 
provided by the college. Please be sure the form is filled in com- 
pletely, or the processing of your application will be delayed. 

C. Students must complete 15 semester hours of academic course 
work at Montclair State College before acceptance into a degree 
program will be considered. 

D. Students must submit the "APPLICATION FOR MATRICULA- 



*Candidates for industrial arts may substitute 2 units in this area instead. 



14 GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

TION"'form during the semester they are enrolled for course 
work which brings their total to 15 semester hours of study. 
E. Students submitting the "APPLICATION FOR MATRICULATION" 
form will be requested to meet with Evening Division personnel 
for a personal interview. 

Graduate Degree Programs— Master of Arts 
Major Areas 

Graduate programs are offered in the following major areas: Admin- 
istration and Supervision, Business Education, Distributive Education, 
English, Fine Arts, Foreign Languages (French and Spanish), Health Edu- 
cation, Home Economics, Industrial Education and Technology, Mathe- 
matics Education, Music, Outdoor Education and Conservation, Physical 
Education, Psychology, Pure and Applied Mathematics, Reading, Science 
(Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Physics), Social Sciences (concen- 
tration in one of the following areas: American History, European History, 
Anthropology, Economics, Geography, Political Science, Sociology, non- 
Western Culture), Speech Arts, Speech Therapy, and Student Personnel 
Services, including School Social Work (the visiting teacher). In addition, 
a major in Teaching is also available. 

Persons Eligible 

These programs are open to teachers in service, as well as those in- 
terested in professional growth who hold a Bachelor's degree from an 
accredited college or university. 

Admission Procedures 

1. File an application with the Evening Division/Graduate and pay a 
$10.00 application for admission fee. 

2. Have forwarded to the Evening Division/Graduate official tran- 
scripts of all previous college work. (Upon acceptance, a student 
will be furnished a definite statement of requirements, entitled a 
Work Program. The work program must be presented when a stu- 
dent registers in person.) 

3. Submit Graduate Record Examination scores. 

All applications for admission to the Graduate Program and support- 
ing credentials must be filed in the Evening Division/Graduate Office on 
or before: 

April 15 for Summer Admission 
July 15 for Fall Admission 
November 15 for Spring Admission 

Applications received after a filing deadline will be processed in ac- 
cordance with the next filing date. 

General Information 

Transfer of Credits: Not more than 8 semester hours of work taken at 
Montclair prior to matriculation will be accepted for credit toward the 



CERTIFICATION INFORMATION 15 

M.A. degree. Transfer of graduate credit from other accredited institu- 
tions—up to 8 semester hours— may be granted. Effective for all applica- 
tions filed for Spring 1972 admissions, not more than 6 semester hours of 
work taken at Montclair, another college or both, prior to matriculation 
will be accepted for credit towards the M.A. degree. 

Master's Thesis: Students writing a thesis must register for the course. 
Departmental 600, Master's Thesis, v/hich carries 4 semester hours of cred- 
it. For further information regarding the thesis, see the Graduate Bulletin 
and Graduate Advisor. 

Application for Final Evaluation: This application form is obtained in the 
Evening Division office by the candidate anticipating the completion of 
the degree requirements. The responsiblity for makng application rests 
with the candidate. This form must be completed and returned before: 

March 15 for students completing requirements by the end of the 

Summer Session 
July 1 for students completing requirements in the Fall Semester 
November 15 for students completing requirements in the Spring 

Semester 

Students should check with advisors concerning final examination dates 
and other details involved with the graduation procedure. 

Comprehensive Examination. The examination will be given twice a year, 
once in October and once in March, in accordance with the dates and 
times established by each department. It is the student's responsibility 
to file the "NOTIFICATION FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION" 
form with his advisor. The form is available in the Evening Division Office. 
This procedure should be completed at least six (6) weeks prior to the 
examination date in order to allow ample time for the department to com- 
municate with each candidate concerning any pre-examination procedure. 
Students who fail the departmental Comprehensive Examination are per- 
mitted to retake this examination on the next examination date and no 
more than three times. 

Students are advised to consult the Graduate Bulletin for additional in- 
formation. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION PROGRAM-NEW JERSEY 

I. ENROLLING AT MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

A. Students who plan to take courses leading to certification for sec- 
ondary and/or special subject teaching must file an Application 
for Admission form with the Evening Division at Montclair State 
College. The completed application form, ten dollars ($10.00) 
non-refundable application fee, official college transcripts, and a 
letter stating the subject area(s) in which certification is desired, 
must be forwarded to the Evening Division (Attention: Certification 
Advisor) at least one month prior to the registration dates. Evalu- 
ation of credentials will be made by the Evening Division as part 
of the admissions procedure. 



16 CERTIFICATION INFORMATION 

B. Correspondence subsequently received, including the work pro- 
gram (Program Advisement Sheet), must be presented each time 
a student registers in person for a course or courses. 

C. Students interested in the combined certification and Master of 
Arts with a major in Teaching programs should follow the same 
procedure as other Master's Degree candidates (See page 14). 
Application for the "approved certification program" should be 
completed prior to their first registration. However, students may 
complete up to eight (8) semester hours of course work prior to 
acceptance in the "approved certification program." 
Certification students who have not had an opportunity to file an 
application and are registering for the first time in the Evening 
Division must show official evidence of having earned a Bachelor's 
degree (e.g. undergraduate transcript), and/or official evidence of 
holding an emergency certificate, and/or official evaluation from 
the State Board of Examiners. 

D. All general questions regarding certification should be addressed 
to Certification Advisor, Evening Division, at the College; pre- 
registration advisement by appointment is recommended. 

E. Students wishing to file an application for a teaching certificate 
must follow the procedure outlined under IV. RULES CONCERN- 
ING TEACHING CERTIFICATION and METHODS OF APPLYING 
FOR CERTIFICATION. 

II. COURSE OFFERINGS 

A listing of the Fall 1971 and Spring 1972 Professional Education 
courses applicable toward initial teacher certification may be ob- 
tained upon request from Evening Division/Certification. 

ill. SUPERVISED STUDENT TEACHING AND PLACEMENT 
SERVICES 

A. Supervised Student Teaching (31 :411) 

Students who elect student teaching under Montclair State super- 
vision (31 :411— Supervised Student Teaching) must make appli- 
cation in the semester preceding the semester in which student 
teaching is desired. Application forms must be filed with the Di- 
rector of Student Teaching and Placement by October 1st for 
student teaching in the Spring semester; by April 1st for student 
teaching in the Fall semester. Applications will be accepted only 
after a student has successfully completed all certification course 
requirements. The student teaching period generally extends 
full time for a period of ten consecutive weeks during the Fall or 
Spring Semester. 

Prior to filing an application for student teaching, a minimum of 
ten semester credit hours, including a course in the methods of 
teaching the specific subject for which certification is being 
sought, must be completed at Montclair State College. 



CERTIFICATION INFORMATION 17 

B. Supervised Teaching Seminar (31 :414 & 415) 

In-service teachers holding emergency or provisional certificates 
may elect Education 414 and 415-SUPERVISED TEACHING 
SEMINAR instead of Education 411. These students will be ad- 
mitted to the program only v\/ith prior v\/ritten permission of the 
local superintendent of schools and agreement with the local 
school system regarding a program of joint supervision with Mont- 
clair State College. Unlike Education 411, the Supervised Teach- 
ing Seminar may be the initial course in the student's program. 
Requests for admission to the Seminar should be made in Febru- 
ary of the year prior to the anticipated enrollment date. 

C. Placement Services 

Registration with the Placement Office is open to all students who 
have successfully completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of 
course work at Montclair and are eligible for a teaching certifi- 
cate. Services of the Office include notification of job openings 
for which the applicant is qualified and preparation of supporting 
credentials. Additional information concerning student teaching 
and placement may be obtained from the Director of Student 
Teaching and Placement. 

IV. RULES CONCERNING TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
Every teacher in New Jersey must: 

1 . Be at least eighteen years old. 

2. Be a graduate of an approved high school or have an equivalent 
education or experience as determined by the State Board of 
Examiners. 

3. Be a citizen of the United States, or have preliminary citizen- 
ship status as defined by the law enacted in 1956. 

4. Hold a bachelor's degree, unless otherwise stipulated by State 
Board of Examiners. 

METHODS OF APPLYING FOR CERTIFICATION 

A. County Superintendents of Schools' offices may be contacted 
concerning issuance of certificates in the following cases only: 

1. Applicants who have completed a state approved teacher ed- 
ucation program in another state. 

2. Applicants with at least one year of successful experience un- 
der an appropriate certificate in another state. 

3. Applicants who have been offered employment in a New Jersey 
public school. 

B. Applicants who are not residents of New Jersey and who do not 
have assurance of employment may contact the Office of Teacher 



18 CERTIFICATION INFORMATION 

Education and Certification, State Department of Education, 111 
Franklin Street, Trenton, N.J. 08625. 

C. All students not in the categories outlined above are expected to 
file applications for admission to the approved certification pro- 
grams at Montclair State College in accordance with the procedure 
outlined under I. ENROLLING AT MONTCLAIR STATE COLLEGE 

(page 15). 

1. Upon satisfactory completion of an approved certification pro- 
gram at Montclair State College, each student must contact 
Evening Division/Certification concerning proper procedure for 
obtaining a standard teaching certificate. 

2. Completion of final application form, payment of fees, and is- 
suance of certificates will be handled by Evening Division/Cer- 
tification and the New Jersey Board of Examiners. 

STUDENTS NOT SEEKING ADMISSION TO MONTCLAIR PROGRAMS, 
but 

Desiring to Transfer Credit: 

Undergraduates— Undergraduate students who wish to enroll in 
courses for the purpose of having credit transferred to another institution 
may be admitted by submitting a letter from the Dean of the University or 
College in which the student is enrolled to the Director of the Evening 
Division. 

Graduates— Graduate students who wish to enroll in courses for the 
purpose of having credit transferred to another institution may be admitted 
under the special student classification and must present evidence of a 
Bachelor's degree at registration. 

Desiring to Pursue Special Interests: ' 

Undergraduates— Persons who desire to take courses for cultural, vo-| 
cational or avocational purposes, but who do not wish to engage in a bach- 
elor's degree program may enroll for course work not exceeding twelve 
semester hours (nine in the summer) in any one semester or a total of fif- 
teen semester hours. Students will be required to submit an application 
and receive permission to begin course work. After they have completed 
fifteen semester hours further study will be prohibited unless the studeni 
matriculates into an undergraduate program as described on page 12. 

Graduates— Any person who has received a bachelor's degree ma^ 
register for courses at Montclair. They must present a transcript at reg 
istration in order to establish evidence of their degree and register as i 
special student (status 09). 

Desiring to Obtain Out-of-State Certification: 

Persons registering at Montclair and desiring to obtain certificatior 
in any state other than New Jersey must register as a special studen 
desiring to pursue a special interest. 



CERTI FIC AThON INFORMATION 



1 9 



Desiring to Audit: 

Persons who desire to take courses for cultural, vocational, profes- 
sional or avocational purposes, but who do not wish college credit, may 
register as auditors. All persons auditing a course must establish eligi- 
bility, register, and pay the same tuition fees as other students. 




20 ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS AND PROCEDURES 

Students Responsibility 

The College expects those who are admitted to assume responsibil- 
ity for knowing and meeting the various regulations and procedures set 
forth in the College catalogs. The college reserves the right to terminate 
the enrollment of any student whose conduct, class attendance, or aca- 
demic record should prove unsatisfactory. 

Credit Loads 

Graduate students who are working full time may not register for 
more than three (3) courses for a maximum of nine (9) semester hours. 
Undergraduate students who are not working full time may not register 
for more than twelve (12) semester hours. A maximum of six (6) semester 
hours is strongly recommended for those undergraduate students who 
are employed in full time positions. 

Course Numbering 

A course numbering system has been developed for all courses in 
the various departments and curricula. Courses are numbered in the 
following manner: 

100-199 Freshmen 400-499 .^ Senior-Graduate 

200-299 Sophomore 500-699 Graduate 

300-399 Junior 

Withdrawal From A Course 

A written notice to the Director of Evening Division is required. 
(Notification to the instructor does not constitute an official withdrawal.) 
Upon receipt of the written notice for withdrawal, this office will send 
written acknowledgement to the student. Any student who fails to re- 
ceive such acknowledgement within the next two weeks, should immedi- 
ately notify this office. Refunds are computed from the date of receipl 
of the written notice. Students who do not submit a written notice wil' 
receive the mark of "F" in those courses which they cease to attend' 
Students who withdraw after the midpoint will receive an automatic grade, 
of'F." : 

Withdrawal from courses that meet more than or less than a ful 
semester is allowed up to midpoint of the course. I 

Grades 

Only students enrolled for credit receive grades. The following finai 
grades may be received: 

A Excellent B Good 

C Fair D Poor 

F Failure IN Incomplete 

WD Withdrew NC No Credit 






ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 21 

The mark "D" is not accepted for Master's degree credit at Montclair 
State College. The mark "WD" is given to those who submit in writing 
their intention of withdrawing from a course before the midpoint in the 
semester. The mark "F" signifies: (1) academic failure; (2) the student 
has failed to submit written notice of his withdrawal; (3) the student has 
requested withdrawal after the midpoint in the semester. 

The mark "IN" is given to a student who, because of illness, is unable 
to complete the work by the end of a semester. The work must be com- 
pleted by April 15 for incompletes received in the Fall semester and No- 
vember 15 for incompletes received in the Spring or Summer semesters; 
if said work is not finished on the prescribed date, a final grade of "F" is 
recorded. For courses that meet more than or less than a full semester, 
the above information applies, but is geared to the duration of the course. 

An official record showing credits and grades earned will be mailed 
to the student three weeks following the close of the semester. 

Change of Schedule 

A $5.00 fee will be charged to students who, after their initial regis- 
tration each semester, desire to make any changes in their original class 
schedule other than a withdrawal from a class. 

Changes of schedule may be made as follows: 

Additions: by priority during in-person registration 

Exchanges: prior to the second meeting of new class 

To change from "credit" to "audit" or vice-versa, a student must 
make formal application no later than the midpoint of the semester. 

For all these changes, forms are available in the Evening Division 
Office. 

Cancellation of Courses 

The College reserves the right to close any course for which the en- 
rollment is insufficient. Students may then register in another course or 
receive a refund of tuition. If prerequisites are required (see course list- 
ings), the student must be sure he has fulfilled them or their equivalents. 



Split Sections 

Occasionally because of the demand for a course, it will be necessary 
to split the course into multiple sections. Every effort will be made to insure 
that the first registrants will have the instructor listed. 

Transcript Requests 

Students should complete the transcript request form available in the 
Evening Division Office. Students making such requests in letter form must 
include: own name and address, name and address of receiver of transcript, 
number to be sent, last semester in which registered, whether there are 
both undergraduate and graduate records at Montclair. The fee is $1.00, 
payable in advance to Montclair State College. 



22 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Graduation . 

Candidates for the B.A. or M.A. degrees must file a notification of 
intent to graduate by: 

July 1 for January conferment 
November 15 for June conferment 
March 15 for August conferment 

Commencement exercises are held in the Spring of each year . Stu- 
dents who meet the scholastic requirements for their degree and who have 
fulfilled all other obligations to the College in August or January will be 
awarded diplomas at that time. However, participation in the commence- 
ment exercises is required unless a written request for conferment in 
absentia is approved by the Office of the Vice-President for Instruction. 
Since graduation plans are made well in advance, these requests should be 
made at least two (2) weeks prior to the date of Commencement. 




GENERAL INFORMATION 23 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Office Hours and Phone 

On all days when classes are scheduled, the Evening Division office 
hours are as follows: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, 8:30 
a.m. to 9:00 p.m.; Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 9:00 a.m. to 
12:00 noon. Phone 893-4201. 

Storm Closing 

Students should assume that all courses will be held as scheduled. 
In case of storm, daytime classes may be cancelled, but Evening Division 
courses are usually held. If in doubt, telephone the College. The follow- 
ing radio stations will announce an offcial college closing, WCTC, WPAT, 
WOR, WKER. 

Student Parking 

The college maintains a number of parking lots to be used by stu- 
dents. These areas are designated on a map of the campus that is on the 
inside back cover of this announcement. Under no circumstances are 
students to park in unauthorized areas. Violators of parking regulations 
will be subject to towing and removal of their automobiles. Costs of such 
towing shall be paid in addition to fines. The College assumes no re- 
sponsibility for the car or its contents while it is parked on College prop- 
erty. 

Parking decals may be obtained at registration or in the parking 
office (annex I). The charge will be $10.00 for decals purchased in the 
Fall or Spring (valid for Fall, Spring and Summer) and $5.00 for decals 
purchased in the Summer (valid for the Summer only). 

Veterans' Counselor 

Veterans seeking admission to the Evening Division should apply well 
in advance of the registration dates for a certificate of eligibility and 
entitlement at Newark, New Jersey office (20 Washington Place) of the 
Veterans Administration. In requesting this certificate, the veteran is 
advised to indicate clearly his educational objective. The Veterans Ad- 
ministration has established certain limitations, especially with regard to 
change of course. In order that a veteran may be assured that his certifi- 
|; cate is in order and that he has taken the proper steps to expedite his 
training, under the G. I. Bill, he should report at registration time to the 
Veterans' Counselor whose office is located in Room 217 at College Hall. 

Campus Employment 

There are a limited number of openings for employment on Campus 
available to students who are taking courses at Montclair State College. 
Students may be employed either under the College Work Study Program 
or Student Assistance Program, depending upon financial need. 

For further information, inquire in Room 217, College Hall, Financial 
Aids Office. 



24 GENERAL INFORMATION 

SERVICES 

Academic Advisors 

Appointments with members of the Evening Division Staff and/or 
Faculty may be made by mail or telephone. Appointments should be 
made as early as possible prior to the end of the current semester. De- 
partmental advisors are available during hours of registration. 

Media Services Center 

The Center provides audio-visual materials, equipment and services 
for use by faculty and students for classroom instruction and presentation. 
Video taping equipment is available for use by faculty and staff, as is a 
closed circuit television studio with its complementary equipment. The 
staff of the Center is available for special consultation on audio-visual 
problems, for demonstrations of audio-visual materials and methods and 
for special teaching and training in the area of audio-visual education. 
The Center handles the scheduling of all films for the College as well as 
their ordering, mailing, and rental. Student assistants are provided when- 
ever the use of equipment is requested but are also available for other 
services. 

Bookstore 

Located adjacent to the main lobby of the Student Life Building, this 
on-campus facility will be open during all hours of registration and eve- 
nings during the first two meetings of each class until 8:00 p.m. There- 
after, regular hours of 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. will be in effect Monday 
through Thursday. 

Saturday hours during the Fall and Spring semesters are 8:00-11:00 
a.m. on Saturdays when Evening Division classes are in session. 

Students are advised not to purchase their books until after the first 
meeting of the class. 

Health Services 

There is a registered nurse on duty in the College Health office. This 
office is located in the west wing of Russ Hall. Emergency medical care 
is available. 

Regular office hours are from 8 A.M. until 4 P.M. After 4 P.M.- 
Emergencies only. Between 10 P.M. and 7:45 A.M. a call must be made 
so that the nurse will open the door for you. Phone: 893-4361. 

Library 

The Harry A. Sprague Library is an attractive, modern, air-condi 
tioned building located centrally on the campus. Students and facult), 
are encouraged to use its comfortable facilities which include stud>| 
tables, individual study desks, group conference rooms, faculty carrel.'l 
and inviting lounge areas. Smoking lounges are provided on the grounc 
floor where a typing room is also located for student use. 

A knowledgeable staff of librarians is on hand to guide students ii 
the use of the Library's substantial collection of books and periodical 



I 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

which is constantly expanding. Liberal lending regulations are designed 
to facilitate the students' access to this collection. Copying machines are 
available at nominal cost to those who wish to eliminate tedious note 
taking from printed materials in the Library. Periodicals, books and docu- 
ments in microtext are accessible through the Library's microfilm, micro- 
fiche and microcard readers. 

The general resources of the Library are augmented by a Curriculum 
Laboratory, a rapidly growing collection of United States and New Jersey 
government publications and special collections that include the China 
Institute Library, a New Jersey collection and four important poetry col- 
lections for special research. 

Library hours while classes are in session are as follows: 

Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m. - 10.00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 

Sunday 2:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

During vacation periods when classes are not in session, the library 
is generally open from 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. 

Student Identification-Library Card 

All students registered in the Evening Division may secure a student 
identification-library card for use of the College. This card must be re- 
quested at the Library and picked up in the library about three weeks 
after the registration. It must be retained by the student for use at future 
registrations. Initially, library privileges will be granted upon presentation 
of a current registration receipt. At all registrations, the student will 
receive a gummed label validation which must be affixed to this identifica- 
tion card to establish eligibility for library use and evidence of being 
registered. A replacement fee of $1.00 will be charged if this card is lost. 

Snack Bar 

Located in Student Life Building. Open Monday through Thursday 
^'^ until 8:00 p.m. Closed on Saturday. The Snack Bar is a self-supporting 
^ ' operation. (Hours are subject to change depending upon income.) 

T.U.B. 

Adding to the Life Hall facilities, T.U.B. (Temporary Union Building- 
Annex D) provides a lounge, recreation (pool, ping pong and other games) 
and T.V. area, and a snack bar where food is prepared to order. 

T.U.B. is open seven days a week: Monday through Friday from 7:30 
a.m. -11 :00 p.m.; Saturday from 9:00 a.m. -12:00 midnight; and, Sunday from 
12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. 



Center for Communication Disorders 



The Center for Communication Disorders offers intensive remedial 
speech, language, and audiological services during the fall and spring 
licil semester for children between 3 and 18 years of age. Classes meet 



26 



GENERAL r N F O R M A T (O N 



Monday through Friday. The program provides therapy for children with 
the usual types of speech problems as well as for those who have major 
problems of voice, articulation, and rhythm (stuttering). Clinical services 
are also provided for children with retarded language development or 
loss of language and for children who have speech problems associated 
with tongue thrusting, malocclusion, cleft palate, hearing impairments, 
and special learning disabilities. 

A comprehensive diagnostic interview, for which there is a $25.00 
fee, must precede admission to the program. There is no charge for 
therapy; but there is a $25.00 administrative charge for the program per 
semester. Appointments for diagnosis can be arranged by the secretary 
of the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders. 

Reading Improvement Laboratory 

Available to New Jersey students from intermediate grades through 
high school; small group and individual instruction is given according to 
age, grade and achievement levels. Fall and Spring sessions meet once 
a week from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Summer sessions meet daily for four weeks 
from 9:30 to 11 :30 a.m. The latest in equipment, films, texts and workshop 
materials are used to demonstrate speed of comprehension, study tech- 
niques and vocabulary growth. Enrollment is limited. Apply at least three 
months in advance of each term. Fee: $50.00. Write to: Coordinator, 
Reading and Study-Skills Center. 




i 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 



27 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 

Students desiring to study through the Montclair State College Eve- 
ning Division may register either by mail or in person. Regardless of the 
method chosen, registration must be completed in accordance with the 
instructions below and procedures described under BY-MAIL or IN- 
PERSON. All incomplete or incorrect forms received in the mail will be 
returned and students will have to register in person. 

Registration forms will be sent to all matriculated graduate and un- 
dergraduate Evening Division students whose status (box #7) is 03, 04, X1, 
or X7 and prematriculated graduate and undergraduates 02 <St 10. Students 
in another status 01, 07, 08, and 09 may pick up registration forms in the 
Evening Division office during regular hours. No registration forms will 
be sent to Montclair State undergraduates or undergraduates at another 
college. Materials not used should be retained for future registration since 
materials for the Spring will only be sent to those registered in the Fall. 
Students who do not receive the materials prior to the registration dates 
should contact this office. New students may receive materials by request- 
ing them in writing from the Evening Division Office, ATTN: REGR. Include 
a stamped, self-addressed envelope and indicate the degree you hold (if 
any) and the last time you registered in the Evening Division or Summer 
Session at M.S.C. 



Instructions— All Students 

1. WHITE REGISTRATION FORM-(Use Ink) 

a. Correct printed information and complete information requested in Section 
A, B, C, D, & E. Use the following codes for completing Section B: 



Box No. 1 



Item 

Semester Hours 



Box No. 2 Credit (or Audit) 



Box No. 3 Resident Status 



Box No. 4 Program Number 

Only students in ap- 
proved certification or 
degree programs will 
list department number. 
Others will 00. 



Enter Total 
registering 



Code and Meaning 

No. S.H. for which you 



.Taking courses for credit 

.Not taking courses for credit (i.e. Auditor) 

.Live in N.J. 

.Live out of State but teaching in N.J. 

.Live out of State and not teaching in N.J. 
30-Lib. Sci. 
40-Lang 
41— French 
46— Spanish 
50-Math 
51-Pure Math &. 

Lib. Arts Math 
60-Music 
73-Hlth. Ed. 
76-Phys. Ed. 
80— Science 
81 --Biology 
82-Chem 
83-Physics 
90-Soc. St. 
94-Lib. Arts-Hist 



1. 

2. 

1. 

2. 

3. 

00— Not in a program 

10-Bus. Ed. 

11-Dist. Ed. 

14-Sch. Soc. Work 

15— Psychology 

16-Adm. &. Super. 

17-Stud. Pers. Ser. 

18-MAT 

19— Reading 

20-English 

21-Speech &. Hrg. 

22-Speech &. Dram. 

23-Lib. Arts-Eng. 

24-F. Arts 

26-Home Ec. 

28-lnd. Arts 



28 REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 





Item 




Code and M 


eanins 




Box No. 


5 Sex 


1.. 


.Male 




2... 


.Female 


Box No. 


6 Marital Status 


1.. 


.Single 




2... 


.Married 


Box No. 


7 Status of Student 


01. 


.Initial Cert. 




06.. 


.Other Under- 






XI 


.App. cert. Prog. 




graduate 






02. 


.Pre-Matric 


M.S.C. 


07.. 


.Adv. 






03. 


.Matric. M.A 


- Even. 




Certification 






04. 


.Matric B.A. 


Div. 


08.. 


.Endorsement 






05. 


.M.S.C. 
Undergradu 


ate 


09.. 
10.. 


.Salary, Equiv. 

or own 

Interest 
.Eve. Under- 

graduate- 

Non- 

matriculated 


Box No. 


8 Highest Degree Held 


0.. 


. .None 




2... 


.Master 






1.. 


. .Bachelor 




3... 


.Doctorate 


Box No. 


9 Certificate Held 


0.. 


. .None 




2... 


.Provisional 






1.. 


. .Lim. Stand. 


Perm 


3... 


.Emergency 



Box No. 10 Registration Period 



1 First time registering in the Evening Divi- 
sion or Summer Session at M.S.C. 

2 Previously registered in the Evening Divi- 
sion or Summer Session at M.S.C. 

1 Part Time (Less than 12 Semester Hours) 

2 Full Time (12 S.H. or more) 

1....Yes 2.... No 



1....Yes 



2. ...No 



Box No. 11 Time Code 

Box No. 12 Attending under 
G.I. Bill 

Box No. 13 Attending under 
Institute 

Boxes 14, 15, & 16-Not to be Completed by Student 

b. Complete the back of the form. 

Enter the courses you wish to take completing all columns (section 
only if listed) that are applicable. Use the information beginning on 
page 114 for Fall and 134 for Spring. Since cards are sent in accordance 
with the department and course number required, it is the students 
responsibility to be sure that the information in this area is entirely ac- 
curate. Students who need advisement may wait until they have met 
with their advisor before completing this section. 

Students registering for courses having more than one section are ad- 
vised to list alternate choices in order of preference. 

c. Sign and Date back of form. 

2. RECEIPT VOUCHER-Use Ball Point Pen or Pencil 

Complete the Receipt Voucher— according to the fee information be- 
low and on page 33. This becomes your receipt after validation. 
DO NOT DETACH. 



REGISTRATION PROCEDURES 



29 





UNDERGRADUATE 








GRADUATE 






REGISTRATION 






REGISTRATION 










student 










Student 




No. 


R 


egistration 


Union 




No. 




Registration 


Union 




S.H. 


Tuition 


Fee 


Fee 


Total 


S.H. 


Tuition 


Fee 


Fee 


Total 


1 


$ 20.00 


$2.00 


$ 1.00 


$ 23.00 


1 


$ 25.00 


$2.00 


$ 1.00 


$ 28.00 


2 


40.00 


2.00 


2.00 


44.00 


2 


50.00 


2.00 


2.00 


54.00 


3 


60.00 


2.00 


3.00 


65.00 


3 


75.00 


2.00 


3.00 


80.00 


4 


80.00 


2.00 


4.00 


86.00 


4 


100.00 


2.00 


4.00 


106.00 


5 


100.00 


2.00 


5.00 


107.00 


5 


125.00 


2.00 


5.00 


132.00 


6 


120.00 


2.00 


6.00 


128.00 


6 


150.00 


2.00 


6.00 


158.00 


7 


140.00 


2.00 


7.00 


149.00 


7 


175.00 


2.00 


7.00 


184.00 


8 


160.00 


2.00 


8.00 


170.00 


8 


200.00 


2.00 


8.00 


210.00 


9 


180.00 


2.00 


9.00 


191.00 


9 


225.00 


2.00 


9.00 


236.00 


10 


200.00 


2.00 


10.00 


212.00 












11 


220.00 


2.00 


10.00 


232.00 












12 


240.00 


2.00 


10.00 


252.00 













FULL-TIME GRADUATE STUDENTS registering for 12 semester hours or more: 

$220.00 $2.00 $10.00 $232.00 

3. PARKING (VEHICLE REGISTRATION) 

Students who park a motor vehicle on campus are required to pur- 
chase and display a current decal. Decals purchased during the Fall 
and Spring will incur a $10.00 fee. These decals will be valid through- 
out the 1971-1972 academic year (Fall, 1971, Spring, 1972, and Summer 
1972). Second decals may be purchased for $1.00 at the Parking 
Office. 

4. Complete and submit yellow "Personal Information Form." (New stu- 
dents only) 

5. Verification for registration (New students only) 

a. Graduate students (new students only) must enclose a transcript 
indicating receipt of a bachelor's degree. 

b. Evening Undergraduates (new students only) must enclose the "per- 
mission to begin course work" or letter of pre-matriculation. 

To Complete Registration By Mail 

1. Advisement and Departmental Signatures 

a. Students who are presently matriculated in an M.A. program, or in 
a certification program, or in an undergraduate Evening Division 
program (i.e. those who have a work program prescribed by the col- 
lege) DO NOT have to meet with their advisor for a signature, pro- 
viding they are not deviating from their work program or, unless so 
directed. 

b. All students not in perscribed programs at Montclair State College 
who desire to register by mail must meet with the departmental ad- 
visor, and secure his signature (as required by the college) prior to 
registering by mail. Advisors will be available in departmental of- 
fices according to the following dates and times: 



30 REGJSTRATION PROCEDURES 

Fall Semester-August 3-5, 1 :30-2:30 p.m. 

Spring Semester— December 13-16, 6:15-7:15 p.m. 

If courses are taken in more than one department, a signature is 
required from an advisor in each department. 

2. Schedule for Mailing Registration 

Students must submit their Registration Form, Receipt Voucher, the 
appropriate verification as listed under 5(a), (b) above, Vehicle Registra- 
tion Form (if needed) and check or money order according to the priority 
below. Students may mail after the initial priority but not before. 

Status Code (Box 7) Fall Semester Spring Semester 

XI, 03, and 04 July 26-29 November 29-December 2 

01, 02, 06, 07, X7, 08, 09, 10 August 2-20 December 13-19 

3. Mailing 

Registration will be processed on a priority basis. 

All registrations which are incorrect, incomplete or postmarked after 
August 20, 1971 for the Fall Semester and December 19, 1971 for the 
Spring Semester will be returned and students will be required to reg- 
ister in person according to the prescribed priority schedule on pages 



Make Check Payable To: 

Montclair State College 



Mail Registrations To: 

Evening Division Office 
Montclair State College 
Upper Montclair, New Jersey 07043 
ATTN: REGF 



Class Admission Card(s), Library-Identification Label 
and Receipt Will Be Mailed to the Student 

TO COMPLETE REGISTRATION IN PERSON 

Students who have not taken advantage of the mail registration and 
wish to register must come in person according to the priority schedule 
on the following pages. Students who have received registration mater- 
ials in the mail should bring them when registering in person. Details for 
registration will be posted in College Hall. Students must bring records 
of previous college work in order to establish priority for registration. In 
addition, matriculated students must present their Work Program to ad- 
visors. Students registering as first time certification or special students 
must present a transcript of their undergraduate or graduate studies. 
Previously registered certification students must have their Work Pro- 
gram or a letter from Trenton. Students are expected to make payment 
in full unless prior arrangements have been made with the business office. 



IN PERSON REGISTRATION 31 

TIME AND PRIORITY SCHEDULE 
FALL SEMESTER -1971 



Status 
Date & Time Code: Classification 

Tuesday, Sept. 7 03 Matriculated MSC graduate students, and 

5:00-6:30 p.m. 04 Matriculated MSC Evening Division Undergrad- 

uate students. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. 01, XI Certification students previously registered at 

MSC, (does not include MSC undergraduates), 
working toward their first certificate to teach. 
This does not include those working on ad- 
vanced certificates or endorsements on their 
original certificate. (Work program or letter 
from Trenton required.) 

6:30-9:00 p.m. 01 Certification students, registering for the first 

time at MSC, working toward their first certifi- 
cate to teach in New Jersey. All students must 
attend a registration meeting which will be held 
promptly at 6:30 p.m. in the College Hall C-304. 
Registration procedures follow this meeting. 

6:30-9:00 p.m. 02 Pre-matriculated Graduate Students. (Students 

who have filed an application and have re- 
ceived a letter indicating they are "pre-matric- 
ulated. This letter should be presented at reg- 
istration in order to establish priority. 

6:30-9:00 p.m. 10 Non-matriculated M.S.C. Evening Division Un- 

dergraduates who have made application and 
received permission to begin course work. 

Wednesday, Sept. 8 X7 Special students (non-matriculated students, 

5:00-9:00 p.m. 07 working beyond B.A. or M.A., matriculated M.A. 

08 candidataes at other institutions, auditors, en- 

09 dorsements on original certificates, out-of-state 
certification, and advanced certification, such 
as guidance, secondary school principal, etc.) 
Students must bring transcript of undergradu- 
ate or graduate work or evidence of a college 
degree. 



Students unable to take advantage of the above priority arrange- 
ment may register with other groups provided they arrive after their prior- 
ity schedule. Students MAY NOT register ahead of their priority listing. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

September 9, 10-3:00-5:00 p. m.-Room C-121 
September 11-9:00-12:00 noon-Room C-121 

Students registering on September 9, 10 or 1 1 will be charged a $5.00 late 
registration fee. 

NO REGISTRATIONS ACCEPTED AFTER SEPTEMBER 11 



32 IN PERSON REGISTRATION 

TIME AND PRIORITY SCHEDULE 
SPRING SEMESTER -1972 



Status 
Date & Time Code: Classification 

Monday, Jan. 24 03 Matriculated MSC graduate students, and 

5:00-6.30 p.m. 04 Matriculated MSC Evening Division Undergrad- 

uate students. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. 01, XI Certification students previously registered at 

MSC, (does not include MSC undergraduates), 
working toward their first certificate to teach. 
This does not include those working on ad- 
vanced certificates or endorsements on their 
original certificate. (Work program or letter 
from Trenton required.) 

6:30-9:00 p.m. 01 Certification students, registering for the first 

time at MSC, working toward their first certifi- 
cate to teach in New Jersey. All students must 
attend a registration meeting which will be held 
promptly at 6:30 p.m. in the College Hall C-304. 
Registration procedures follow this meeting. 

6:30-9:00 p.m. 02 Pre-matriculated Graduate Students. (Students 

who have filed an application and have received 
a letter indicating they are "pre-matriculated. 
This letter should be presented at registration 
in order to establish priority. 

6:30-9:00 p.m. 10 Non-matriculated M.S.C. Evening Division Un- 

dergraduates who have made application and 
received permission to begin course work. 

Special students (non-matriculated students, 
working beyond B.A. or M.A., matriculated M.A. 
candidates at other institutions, auditors, en- 
dorsements on original certificates, out-of-state 
certification, and advanced certification, such 
as guidance, secondary school principal, etc.) 
Students must bring transcript of undergradu- 
ate or graduate work or evidence of a college 
degree. 



Tuesday, Jan. 25 


X7 


5:00-9:00 p.m. 


07 




08 




09 



Students unable to take advantage of the above priority arrangement 
may register with other groups provided they arrive after their priority 
schedule. Students MAY NOT register ahead of their priority listing. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

January 26, 27, 28-3:00-5:00 p.m.-Room C-121 
January 29-9:00-12:00 noon-Room C-121 

Students registering on January 26, 27, 28 and January 29, will be charged 
a $5.00 late registration fee. 

NO REGISTRATION ACCEPTED AFTER JANUARY 29. 



FEES 33 

TUITION, FEES AND EXPENSES* 

All checks should be made out to: Montclair State College 

Students are expected to make payment in full when registering, un- 
less prior arrangements have been made with the business office. 

TUITION 

Undergraduate (those students who do not hold a bachelor's 
degree) Per semester hour of credit $ 20.00 

Graduate (those students who hold at least a bachelor's de- 
gree) Per semester hour of credit $ 25.00 

Full Time Graduate Students (12 s.h. or more) $220.00 

REGISTRATION FEE 

To be paid each time a student registers— non-refundable . . .$ 2.00 

STUDENT UNION BUILDING FEE 

To be paid each time a student registers— non-refundable 

Per semester hour (to a maximum of $10.00) $ 1.00 

MUSIC FEES 

Students registering for applied music courses must pay tuition and 
fees according to the following schedule: 

Credit Tuition Music Fee 

1 s.h. (8 lessons) $ 25.00 $ 75.00 

2 s.h. (15 lessons) 50.00 150.00 

4 sh. (15 lessons) 100.00 100.00 

6 s.h. (15 lessons) 150.00 50.00 

LATE REGISTRATION 

An additional fee charged to all students who fail to register 
during the regular registration period— non-refundable $ 5.00 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION FEE 

$10.00 to be paid when student files an application for admission to 
a program. This fee must accompany the application form and is not re- 
fundable. 

^CHANGE OF CLASS SCHEDULE FEE 

A $5.00 fee charged to students who, after their initial registration 
each semester, desire to make any changes in their original class sched- 
ule other than a withdrawal from a class. 

TRANSCRIPT FEE 

$1.00 for single copy. Inquire in the Evening Division Office. 



^Subject to change any time by action of the State Board of Higher Education. 



k 



34 FEES 



REFUNDING OF TUITION 



In accordance with a decision of the State Board of Education on 
May 3, 1962, the following uniform schedule of refunds was effective in 
all New Jersey State Colleges on September 1, 1962: 

Per Cent 
Periods of Withdrawal Refunded 

Withdrawal before course begins 100% 

Withdrawal during first third of course 60% 

thru October 13 (Fall Semester) 
thru March 4 (Spring Semester) 

Withdrawal between first third and first half of course .... 30% 
thru November 3 (Fall Semester) 
thru March 25 (Spring Semester) 

Withdrawal during last half of course None 

Tuition and service charges are refunded in full if classes are dis- 
continued by the authorities at the college. 

Refunds for full-time graduate students who withdraw from ALL 
courses will be processed in accordance with the above percentage 
schedule. 

Refunds for full-time graduate students who, reduce their load to lessi 
than 12 semester hours will be processed as follows: 

Prior to the first class meeting of the student's schedule, tuition will 
be calculated for the reduced credit load at $25 per s.h. If the per| 
s.h. tuition is less than the $220 fulltime tuition, the difference will] 
be refunded to the student; if the per s.h. tuition is greater than $220,| 
the student must pay the difference. 

After the first class meeting of the student's schedule, there will be 
no refund. I 

IN COMPUTING REFUNDS, THE DATE OF WITHDRAWAL IS THE 
DATE ON WHICH THE EVENING DIVISION OFFICE RECEIVES A 
WRITTEN NOTICE FROM THE STUDENT. 



DEPARTMENT AND BUILDING CODES 35 

COURSES OF THE EVENING DIVISION 

FALL 1971 AND SPRING 1972 

The courses listed below will be offered through the Evening Divi- 
sion during the Fall, 1971 and Spring, 1972. Courses numbered 500 or 
above are open only to graduate students; those numbered 400-499, in- 
clusive, are senior-graduate courses; and those below 400 carry under- 
graduate credit only. 

Some 400 courses listed indicate that they may not be used for grad- 
uate credit. 

THE DAILY SCHEDULE BEGINS ON PAGE 123. 

All students should be careful not to enroll in courses which they 
have previously taken. The final responsibility for duplication of courses 
rests with the student. 

The College reserves the right to cancel any course or to make 
changes. 

CODES FOR BUILDINGS 

Life Hall A Annex I I 

Annex II B Speech K 

College Hall C Calcia Fine Arts Building .... L 

Annex IV E McEachern Music Building . . . M 

Finley Hall F Panzer Gymnasium P 

Partridge Hall G Sprague Library S 

College High School H Mallory Hall V 



DEPARTMENTAL CODES 

Course descriptions in the following section have been arranged by 
Schools and by departments within Schools. Departmental offerings 
* may be found according to the listing below. 



ml 



Department 


Page 


Department 


Page 


Educational Foundations and 






Physics and Geo-science 


78 


Comparative Studies 




40 


Business Studies 


79 


Educational Leadership 




42 


Distributive Education 


82 


Educational Research &, 






Business Administration 


82 


Evaluation 




45 


Home Economics 


85 


Human Organizational Processes 


46 


Industrial Education and 




Curriculum and Instruction 




37 


Technology 


86 


Personnel Services 




47 


Vocational Education 


90 


Special Instructional Areas 




50 


Health Education 


91 


Technology in Education 




54 


Physical Education 


93 



36 



DEPARTMENT AND BUILDING CODES 



Department 


Page 


Department 


Page 


Fine Arts 


55 


Anthropology 


95 


Music 


58 


Economics 


96 


Speech and Theater 


61 


Geography 


97 


English 


64 


History 


98 


French 


67 


Political Science 


101 


Spanish and Italian 


69 


Psychology 


103 


Philosophy and Religion 


71 


Sociology 


109 


Biology 


72 


Communication Sciences &, 




Chemistry 


73 


Disorders 


111 


Mathematics 


74 


Library Science 


113 



m 
r 

!1; 



k 



EDUCATION 37 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
Department of Curriculum and Instruction 

31:A400 Teacher, School and Society 

This course is intended as an introduction to the field of education. It is an 
overview of selected areas in which the teacher, as a professional educator, 
should acquire knowledge and understanding such as the school as a social and 
legal system, the nature and function of the teacher within these systems, and the 
student: his expectations and impact upon the system. (Formerly 15:424) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31 :A410 Field Experiences in Education 

The student will spend from 30 to 90 hours as a teacher's assistant in a public 
school, performing many of the functions of a teacher except direct class teach- 
ing. He may work with individual students, small groups of students, prepare 
learning materials, score examinations, etc. These experiences may be in more 
than one school. 

One to three semesters— 1 s.h. for each 30 hours. Three semester hours 
credit for this course will be granted for students enrolled in the professional 
semester program. (Formerly 15:402) 

1-3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A414 Supervised Teaching Seminar 

This seminar is provided for in-service teachers employed on an emergency 
or provisional certificate and is open to students participating in the "approved" 
certification program or the Master of Arts in Teaching program. Arrangements 
are made with the employing Superintendent of Schools for joint supervision of 
the in-service teacher by local school and College officials. The student will as- 
sume full teaching responsibilities and will meet periodically at the college for a 
complete academic year. 

In this seminar students have an opportunity to examine their teaching ma- 
terials and techniques and to share their experiences with other beginning teach- 
ers. Cooperating local school personnel and supervising instructors assist the 
new teachers with their on-the-job problems. (Formerly 15:404, 405) 

6 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A415 Supervised Teaching Seminar 

This course is a continuation of 31 :A414. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

31:A420 Instructional Innovations 

This course will acquaint the student with the rapidly developing innovative 
practices in teaching. It will be organized on a team teaching basis to consider 
new ways of organizing students, staff, curriculum, time and space, as well as to 
investigate such techniques as independent study, group dynamics, programmed 
instruction and student evaluation. (Formerly 15:420) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



38 EDUCATION 

31:A423 Teaching in the Urban Schools 

This course acquaints the student with the socio-economic setting of the 
inner-city schools and studies the inner-city school system through its students, 
administrators, teachers and special personnel (guidance, medical staff, remedial 
work specialists). Other areas examined will be the specific problems brought to 
the school by the inner-city student which reflect his mores and family patterns, 
the recent theories, practices and programs for changes in teaching in urban 
schools, the recent innovations in funding and their impact on urban education, 
the ideas for reorganization of the schools and the school systems, the explora- 
tion of techniques employed to re-orient experienced urban teachers to develop 
more effective teaching methods. Visits to urban schools and agencies are ar- 
ranged to provide background experience and understanding. (Formerly 15:423) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A431 The Junior High School Curriculum 

Recent trends in the development of the junior high school curriculum and the 
relation of the curriculum to the aims, functions, and organization of the junior 
high school are covered. Curriculum patterns in representative junior high 
schools are studied and evaluated. An opportunity is given to each student to 
develop units of work for junior high school subjects in the major of his choice. 
(Formerly 15:461) 
3 semester hours Fall 

31:A440 Curriculum and Methods in Sex Education 

This is a course in which students will develop curriculums to fit into their in- 
dividual schools. Methods for implementing these curriculums will be demon- 
strated, and current texts and audio-visual materials will be analyzed. (Formerly 
15:436) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A450 Teaching Strategies to Develop Critical Thinking, Part I 

This course, which stresses classroom theory and laboratory application, 
utilizes the strategies associated with a set of thinking skills identified by the 
research of Dr. Hilda Tabs. These thinking tasks are generic to all content areas, 
appropriate for all grade levels, and essential to the development of self-directed, 
higher-level thinking. The laboratory application is to help teachers to apply the 
skills and theory necessary to implement an inductive and process-oriented cur- 
riculum in a regular classroom setting. 

4 semester hours Fall Semester 

31:A451 Teaching Strategies to Develop Critical Thinking, Part II 

Continuation of 31 :A450. 
Prerequisite: 31 :A450. 
4 semester hours Spring Semester 

31:A516 Strategies for Educational Change j 

This course is intended to enable educators to develop practical strategies' 
for the achievement of desired educational change in field settings. Principles' 
and concepts relating to change from the fields of sociology, social psychology,' 
educational administration, and curriculum are applied to education. The oppor- 
tunity to develop change strategies for particular field settings is provided. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters! 



EDUCATION 39 

31:A530 Principles of Curriculum Development 

The study of the curriculum as conceived by professionals and the impact of 
the supporting society on curriculum will be the major purpose of this course. 
The criteria for selecting content and its sequential development in relation to 
individual differences as they relate to the societal values in a dynamic society 
will be examined. Stress will be placed on the role of leadership in guiding 
needed curriculum changes wisely. (Formerly 15:532) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A531 Curriculum Construction in the Elementary School 

The purposes of this course are threefold: (1) to review and bring up to date 
the student's knowledge of basic curriculum development concepts; (2) to study 
in detail the process of curriculum construction in a modern elementary school; 
and (3) to provide the student with the experience of creating an elementary 
school curriculum in a specific field for one or more grade levels. 

Prerequisite: At least one year of successful teaching experience under 
certification. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

31:A532 Middle School Curriculum and Organization 

The emerging curriculum of the rapidly developing middle school is explored. 
Attention is given to the organization of pupils, instruction, media, and facilities. 
The influences of recent social changes and educational innovations are em- 
phasized. Students have opportunities to study practices in typical middle schools 
and to develop instructional strategies. (Formerly 15:531) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A533 Curriculum Construction in the Secondary School 

The purpose of this course is to consider the extent to which the secondary 
school curriculum meets the needs of a changing civilization, and to consider ef- 
fective means of curriculum construction. (Formerly 15:530) 

Prerequisite: One and one half years successful teaching experience under 
certification. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A635 Research Seminar in Curriculum Construction 

This is a seminar designed for individual advanced work in curriculum con- 
struction. (Formerly 15:619) 

Admission is upon approval of the instructor. 

Prerequisites: 530 and either 531 , 532, or 533. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

31:A640 Workshop in Education: Psychology-Sex Education 

A workshop-lecture course in which eminent psychologists, health educators, 
religious leaders, sociologists, biologists, phvsicians and media specialists will 
lecture and participate in group discussions. Topics emphasized will be: sex edu- 
cation in the home, marriage and family relations, genetics, birth control, sex and 
religion, developmental phychology and the sex role, sex and the self-concept. 
(Formerly 15:601 E) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



40 EDUCATION 

Department of Educational Foundations 
and Comparative Studies 

32:A440 Sociological Foundations of Education 

This course deals with those aspects of sociology which are relevant to an 
understanding of educational problems. Topics which will be considered are: 
cultural dimensions of personality and behavior; role theory; social and cultural 
conditions of learning; influence of the family, peer groups, and socialization on 
behavior and learning; individual and group behavior; the school as a social sys- 
tem; the school in the community and society; stratification; functional and dys- 
functional consequences of various teaching practices on behavior and learning; 
and factors which facilitate or inhibit social change. Emphasis is placed on the 
application of sociological theory to educational practice. (Formerly 15:406) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

31:A445 Puerto Rican Children in Mainland Schools 

An introduction to the experience of Puerto Rican children in mainland 
schools with particular attention to migration; the Puerto Rican family; Puerto 
Rican life-styles, child rearing and socialization; social behavior of children; cul- 
tural identity, cultural pluralism; bilingual education; learning needs; and evolv- 
ing programs. Includes visits to schools. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

32:A520 Educational Thought to the 18th Century 

An examination of philosophic assumptions and beliefs behind various edu- 
cational theories which have been proposed through the centuries, from Classical 
to Modern schools of thought. The development of Realism, Idealism, Experi- 
mentalism. Scholasticism, and other schools will be discussed through the con- 
sideration of such great thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Rous- 
seau and others. (Formerly 15:533) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

32:A521 Contemporary Educational Thought 

Critical evaluations of specific schools of philosophy which have contributed 
to educational thought in the 20th century such as Pragmatism, Progressivism, 
Existentialism, Perennialism, Reconstructionism, and others. An analysis of cur- 
rent trends and problems as well as the principles underlying educational theory 
and practice will be included. (Formerly 15:548) 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

32:A523 Existentialism in Education 

An intensive study of the existential motifs in Sartre, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, 
Heidegger, Buber, and Camus with emphasis on the implications for educational 
aims, curriculum, methods, and values. The works of contemporary educators 
such as Morris, Kneller, Greene, and Happer who have begun to define the mean- 
ing of Existentialism for education, will be explored. (Formerly 15:547) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

32:A525 Ethical Problems of Educational Practice 

A survey of the factors involved in value formation in our society; a view of 
the values actually taught in school today. Considerations of such questions as 



EDUCATION 41 

"Who should be taught in the schools?," "Can values be taught to children?," 
"What ideals are important for boys and girls to learn?," or "What should a stu- 
dent's role or position in school be?" should be included within the context of 
underlying philosophic forces. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

32:A540 Social Forces and Education 

An examination of the various facets of society that have a distinct impact 
upon the educational system. The course includes an analysis of economic, po- 
litical, social, ethnic, and religious forces as they relate to problems of our edu- 
cational systems. Field studies will be part of this course. (Formerly 15:545) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

32:A544 Social Class and Education 

An intensive study of the social, ethnic, and racial customs as they relate to 
class structure and to educational values. A consideration of the traditions pro- 
moted by various social groups which have contributed to the melting pot of 
America, and the effect of such traditions on American education. Psychological 
patterns evolving from such customs and traditions will also be considered. Fi- 
nally, all of these factors should be examined in the light of apparent contempory 
changes occurring in American society and American education. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

32:A545 Political Forces and Education 

An intensive study of the political structure and its influence upon the edu- 
cational system, as well as the ability of education to influence the political sys- 
tem. Particular attention will be given to specific roles that education and edu- 
cational leaders play in the various levels of governmental bodies. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

32:A560 Comparative Studies of Educational Systems 

An examination of educational institutions and systems in various areas of 
the world with particular attention given the following problems: the relationship 
between social structure and the types of educational institutions, the struggle 
for change within industrialized societies and efforts for educational change 
within developing areas. The course will cover studies of education in Latin 
America, Germany, England, France, Soviet Union, Israel, India, China, Japan, 
and selected areas of tropical Africa. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

32:A561 Education in Western Europe 

The course focuses on changes in Western European societies since World 
War I and their impact upon education. Particular attention is given to technolog- 
ical changes, the conflicts between elitism and the demands of an advancing 
economy. Political forces before, during, and after the Nazi control of power will 
be considered. Additional study will be given to efforts for reform initiated by 
student movements. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

32:A564 Education in Latin America 

The course begins with an analysis of the basic social and economic struc- 
ture and how that structure relates to secondary school and university systems. 



42 EDUCATION 

The following topics will be considered: the impact of revolutions on educational 
systems; the affect of population explosion on education; personnel and voca- 
tional problems; elitist education; and elementary school problems. Focus is on 
Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, and Cuba. (Formerly: 15:591) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Department of Educational Leadership 

33:A510 Educational Administration I 

This basic course in Educational Leadership examines the nature and dy- 
namics of organizations from the viewpoints of the social and behavioral sciences. 
Leadership, decision-making, conflict resolution, and other theories are consid- 
ered in the educational setting. Students view the impact of environmental and 
personal forces on organizational behavior. (Formerly 15:510) 

Prerequisite: One and one-half years of successful teaching under certifica- 
tion. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

33:A513 Secondary School Administration 

This course considers the special administration problems of the junior and 
senior high school. Such topics as recruitment of staff, scheduling of teachers 
and students; department organization and school morale are studied. Recent 
experiments in organization structure are reviewed. Supervision of instruction is 
emphasized as a major function of administration. The current demands of the 
adults in the community and the students and how these relate to the role of the 
school in the guidance of youth is placed as a concern of administration. How 
the secondary school operates in relation to the elementary school and higher 
education is studied to help design education as a continuous process. Students 
write a paper on a special administrative problem. (Formerly 15:520) 

Prerequisite: Introduction to Educational Administration I. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

33:A521 School Law 

After an introductory general study of such topics as legal theory, practical 
politics, the relationship of school district organization to other units of govern- 
ment, the appellate function of the State Commissioner of Education and the 
State Board of Education, the course is concerned principally with the study of 
New Jersey school laws (Title ISA of the Revised Statutes) and the Rules and 
Regulations of the State Board of Education and their decisions. The New Jer- 
sey School legal structure is compared with that of other states. (Formerly 15:514) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

33:A523 School Plant Planning 

This is a basic course in school plant planning which treats the relationships 
between educational facilities and educational programs. Such topics as school 
site selection, the development of educational specifications, the school's phy- 
sical environment, the selection of equipment, the programming of various facil- 
ities based on curricula and community needs are included in the course. Group 
visits to exemplary educational facilities are an integral part of the instructional 
process. (Formerly 15:525) 

Prerequisite: A course in the principles and methods of curriculum design 
and Educational Administration I. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



EDUCATION 43 

33:A526 School Business Administration 

This is a basic course concerning the role of school business administration 
in the public school. The various functions and structures of school business 
operations and the techniques employed in their operation are surveyed. Various 
simulation techniques are utilized to construct both a traditional and PPBS budget 
document. (Formerly 15:511) 

Prerequisite: Educational Administration I. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

33:A540 Supervision I 

This course covers the supervisory role of such school personnel as princi- 
pals, coordinators, and department and subject area supervisors both in the 
elementary and secondary schools. It examines the theoretical human relations 
problems met with by those designated as supervisors. Inasmuch as this role has 
undergone many changes within the last twenty years in its contribution to im- 
proving instruction and in supporting the professional work of classroom teachers, 
the importances of this change is emphasized. (Formerly 15:540) 

Prerequisite: One and one-half years of teaching experience. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

33:A541 Supervision II 

This course applies the best theories of supervision to the day-to-day opera- 
tion of schools at certain levels, and within special subject areas of study. How 
to organize for instructional improvement and innovation; how to give special at- 
tention to new teachers, probationary teachers, are topics of major consideration. 
Each student prepares a notebook, or file on helpful ideas, plans, descriptions of 
practice, materials of instruction suited to the level on special subject area in 
which he plans a career. (Formerly 15:541) 

Prerequisite: Supervision I or its equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

33:A550 Historic and Philosophic Development of Adult-Continuing Education 

The identification of historic, philosophic, psychological and sociological 
basis upon which foundation present-day adult-continuing education is built in 
the United States. An historic perspective will be utilized to provide opportunity 
for the student to develop. (Formerly 15:560) (Not offered every year) 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

33:A553 Administration and Supervision of Adult-Continuing Education 

This course considers the various administrative and supervisory roles in 
directing a program in Adult-Continuing Education. Particular attention will be 
given to an analysis and application of the technical, human relation and con- 
ceptual skills of administration to problems identified in Adult-Continuing Educa- 
tion. (Not offered every year) 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

35:A560 The American College 

An overview of the structure and functioning of the American College. Rele- 
vant history, philosophy, sociology and politics will be reviewed, with the goal of 



44 EDUCATION 

understanding the college as a unique and dynamic institution in American society 
today, e.g., educational opportunity and the organization of higher education; 
open admissions: status, trends and implications; minority group youth in higher 
education; student initiatives for reform; faculty governance; etc. (For new col- 
lege administrators, members of governing boards and others professionally in- 
volved in higher education. Registration by permission only.) 
3 semester hours. [Dr. Richardson] Fall Semester 

33:A565 The Two-Year Junior College 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the history, purposes, 
patterns, and trends of the two-year college, including the junior college, the 
community college, and university extension centers. (Formerly 15:505) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

33:A619 Seminar in Administration: Supervision and Curriculum 

This seminar provides an opportunity for the student to initiate and complete 
an original research project in the fields of Administration and/or Curriculum de- 
velopment. This course is open to students matriculated for a Master's degree in 
Administration and Supervision and to others upon permission of the instructor. 
This seminar should be taken after a student has completed at least 24 semester 
hours in his work program. 

Prerequisite: 34:503 or its equivalent. 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesiers 

33:A620 Systems Analysis in Education 

This is a course which utilizes the latest techniques in operations research 
for educational purposes. Systems analysis techniques are studied and utilized 
by the student in an instructional, curricula, or administrative mode. Simulation 
techniques are widely used in classroom-oriented activities. (Formerly 15:517) 
(Not offered every year) 

Prerequisite: A course in curriculum and/or school administration, 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

33:A622 School Finance 

After an introductory unit concerned with the current economic environment, 
this course is devoted to a study of state, local and federal taxation, state school 
aid theory and practice, school district indebtedness, statutory school budget and 
fiscal controls, and various cost-quality instruments. The role of school fiscal 
structure in relation to local, state and federal governments also is studied. (For- 
merly 15:516) 

Prerequisite: School, Educational Administration 1. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

33:A628 Field Experiences in Administration and Supervision 

Students are assigned to a particular junior or senior high school, where un- 
der the guidance of a school administrator or supervisor they carry out certain 
functions of these positions. A college staff member acts as coordinator and 
supervisor of this activity by visiting the school and consulting with the student, 
observing him, in action and plans with the school personnel for improvement and 
evaluation of the student's work. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



EDUCATION 45 

Department of Educational Research and Evaluation 

34:A503 Methods of Research 

An introduction to the theory and methods of historical, descriptive, and ex- 
perimental research. Course topics include: formulation of a research problem, 
use of bibliographical sources and references materials, PERT, measurement in 
research, types and instruments of research, data collection and analysis, writing 
the research report, and career opportunities in research. (Formerly 15:503) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

34:A504 Action Research for Teachers 

This course is designed to provide teachers with an understanding of the 
basic principles and techniques of research which are applicable to their class- 
room situations. Examples of various kinds of classroom research, both of an 
individual and group nature, are studied and analyzed. Practice is provided in 
the planning and outlining of specific research projects, the development of ex- 
perimental designs, and the evaluation of the structure and outcomes of class- 
room research. Each student develops, in detail, a plan for a research project 
which he might be interested in undertaking in his own classroom. (Formerly 
15:504) 

Open to M.A.T. and certification students only. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

34:A507 Measurement and Evaluation I 

A theory and practice course designed to develop comprehension of and 
skill in constructing tests in the cognitive domain, such as intelligence, achieve- 
ment, and aptitude tests. Laboratory exercises are included. (Formerly 15:507) 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

34:A508 Measurement and Evaluation II 

A theory and practice course designed to develop comprehension of and 
skill in constructing tests in the affective domain, such as interest tests, attitude 
scales, and self concept tests. Laboratory exercises are included. (Formerly 
15:508) 

Prerequisite: A course in testing. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

34:A578 Testing and Evaluation 

This course deals with principles and practices of educational and psycho- 
logical measurement in guidance and teaching. Course topics include: historical 
and philosophical orientation; basic statistical concepts underlying measure- 
ments; test validity and reliability; response set; test construction; evaluation and 
interpretation of testing data; grading; reporting to students, parents, and admin- 
istrators; critical analyses of various standardized intelligence, ability, and per- 
sonality tests; experimental tests. The place of tests in the instructional program 
is stressed (Formerly 15:578) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



46 EDUCATION 

34:A603 Seminar in Research 

An opportunity is provided for the student to carry out a research project- 
historical, descriptive, or experimental in nature— culminating in a written report. 
(Formerly 15:603) 

Prerequisite: 34:503 or equivalent. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



Deparment of Human Organizational Processes 

35:A564 Dynamics of Group Process 

A laboratory-based course for all those who wish to develop group skills 
and understandings. Focus is on experiential learning and personal growth. 
Readings in human interaction theory will be related to actual group participation. 
The function of groups within large organizations will also be studied. (Formerly 
15:564) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

35:A565 Consultation in Organizational Development 

A laboratory-based course which focuses on the role of the organizational 
consultant. The emphasis is on planning, providing help, and evaluating activities. 
Students will develop diagnostic and behavioral skills which aid individuals and 
groups within organizations to become more effective. This course is designed 
for those considering or presently holding administrative, supervisory, or con- 
sultant positions in education, business, industry, government, penology, com- 
munity organizations and the like. 

Prerequisite: 35:A564 Dynamics of Group Process orthe equivalent. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

35:A568 Theoretical Constructs in Social Group Interaction 

A course to develop broad understandings of problems and current practices 
in the areas of small group interaction, social restructuring, and cultural en- 
counter. The literature will be surveyed to develop an awareness of the influence 
of interaction on small group behaviors, learning theories, leadership, decision 
making, social reconstruction, value conflict, and perception of self and others. 
(Not offered every year) 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

35:A661 Group Development Laboratory I 

35:A662 Group Development Laboratory II 

This seminar experience is designed as a core for the professional diploma 
In organizational leadership. Students will participate as group members and 
have periodic opportunities to examine the problems of their group and the ef- 
fects of individual behaviors in group development. Attention will be given to 
methods of applying this experience to the improvement of communication in 
client organization. (Must be taken in two consecutive semesters) (Not offered 
every year) 

3 semester hours each Fall and Spring Semesters each 



EDUCATION 47 

Department of Personnel Services 

36:A451 Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of guidance for teach- 
ers who are concerned with problems of guidance and human relations in the 
classroom. Although the course emphasizes the role of the teacher in guidance, 
it is also designed to give the teacher a picture of the place of guidance in the 
modern school, to indicate the techniques utilized in a good guidance program, 
and to identify some of the tools of the guidance counselor. (As this course can- 
not be used for credit towards the Master's degree in Student Personnel Services, 
graduate students who plan to go into the Student Personnel Program should not 
elect this course.) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A560 Medical Problems in Education 

In this course the role of the educator is studied in relation to the following 
subject areas: childhood, chronic and contagious diseases; nutritional problems; 
narcotics; and psycho-socio-medical pathologies. The impact of health prob- 
lems on the family, school and community is emphasized throughout. (Formerly 
15:509) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

36:A562 Social Case Work 

This course reviews principles in social case work as they relate to the school 
setting. Study is devoted to the theoretical development of social work norms, 
and to the function and role of the school social worker (visiting teacher). Cases 
which have been developed by Social Workers will be studied and experiences 
in a school will be provided. (Formerly 15:577) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A565 The Role of the School Social Worker 

The course will include (a) an intensive examination of the historical devel- 
opment of the role of the School Social Worker, as found in the literature; (b) an 
examination of the contemporary scene as social work relates itself to other em- 
phases in the helping professions; and (c) some original investigations in the area 
of role theory, utilizing the "Role Analysis Paradigm." 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

36:A570 Counseling Adults 

This course is established to study the techniques that are appropriate to the 
counseling of adults. Special attention will be given to the identification of prob- 
lem areas common to students of college age, to parents, and now school adults. 
Much of the class time will be devoted to case studies with ample opportunity for 
the student to engage in supervised practice. (Formerly 15:576) 

Prerequisite: 15:580 Principles of Guidance and Counseling 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

36:A579 The Use of Tests in Counseling 

This course is designed to familiarize Elementary and Secondary school 
counselors with techniques for using test results; for interpreting test results to 



48 EDUCATION 

teachers, administrators, parents and students. Implicit in this course will be the 
use of appropriate statistical analysis to draw conclusions for research and pro- 
gram development. Laboratory techniques will be used to give students practical 
opportunities to administer, score, and interpret a group of tests. Some time will 
be devoted to the planning of the testing program for the Elementary and the 
Secondary School. 

Prerequisite: 34:578, or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

36:A580 Principles of Guidance and Counseling 

Topics included in this course cover: philosophv of guidance, history of the 
guidance movement, the need for guidance presented by children and adoles- 
cents. The methods of gathering useful data are studied, and school records, 
exploratory activities, tests, inventories, the case study approach, occupational 
information, and occupational data are treated as well as general methods of 
guidance with special stress on Interviewing and counseling of students. (Former- 
ly 15:580) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A581 Community Resources for Guidance 

This course deals with the various agencies, industries, and institutions avail- 
able in the surrounding communities for use in guiding students. In addition to 
becoming familiar with the location and nature of these facilities, students learn 
the techniques for arranging student interviews and visits. Class discussion and 
personal research are supplemented by field trips. (Formerly 15:581) 

Prerequisite: 15:580 Principles of Guidance and Counseling. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A582 Vocational Guidance and Occupational Information 

This course is intended for counselors in the junior and senior high schools 
to obtain information about the principles and philosophy of vocational educa- 
tion and the techniques of counseling youth who wish to receive preemployment 
training, and for counselors of out-of-school groups who are attempting to make 
readjustments to occupational life. Attention is also given to guidance techniques 
for job preparation and readjustment, the matching of educational and personal 
abilities to job specifications, the effects of social legislation on the employment 
of youths, and a study of techniques used in determining occupational needs 
and occupational changes. (Formerly 15:582) 

Prerequisite: 36:580. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A583 Educational Guidance 

This course is concerned with the facilities available for education after high- 
school graduation, the problem of further training for pupils leaving school before 
completing high school, and the academic problems of students while in school. 
A brief survey of colleges and college admission procedures is made. (Formerly 
15:583) 

Prerequisite: 36:580. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

36:A585 Group Guidance and Counseling Activities 

This course is concerned with the various techniques for helping individual 
pupils and for using group activities including role-playng as a guidance tech- 



EDUCATION 49 

nique. The group activities considered include those of home rooms, activity 
periods, occupation courses, student field trips, placement follow-ups, college 
nights, and career days. (Formerly 15:585) 

Prerequisite: 36:580. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A586 Elementary School Guidance Services 

This course is designed for guidance counselors in the public schools with 
particular emphasis on the guidance services that may be offered in grades 
kindergarten through six. The guidance program, as established in the public 
schools, envisions supervision and administration of the guidance program from 
the kindergarten through graduation at grade twelve. It is important, therefore, 
that the guidance director understands the services that can be made available 
to the elementary school. (Formerly 15:586) 

Prerequisite: 36:580. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

36:A587 Administration and Supervision of Guidance Programs 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with more complex aspects 
of the supervision and administration of a guidance program. It includes such 
topics as: developing and administering programs of student registration (course 
selection); theory and techniques of scheduling a modern high school; super- 
visory responsibilities of the director of guidance etc. In general, this course is 
aimed at providing essential background for counselors desiring to establish or 
administer a guidance program in a high school or a multi-school system. Within 
and outside of the department; coordinating guidance activities in a multi-school 
district. 

The primary method of study is the examination and evaluation of current 
guidance practices leading to the formation of proposals for improvement, and 
possible inclusion, in guidance programs where the student is working as a coun- 
selor and/or director. (Formerly 15:587) 

Prerequisite: 36:580 and 6 s.h. in the Personnel Services M.A. Degree pro- 
gram. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

36:A588 Techniques of Interviewing and Counseling 

This is an advanced techniques course in the counseling of individual stu- 
dents. The directive, non-directive, client-centered, and role playing approaches, 
as well as the case study methods are studied. Opportunity for demonstration 
and practice with these techniques are implemented with tape recordings, one 
way screens, and closed circuit television. 

Prerequisite: 36:580. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

36:A589 Student Personnel Services in Higher Education 

This course is a study of the student personnel functions in two-year and 
four-year colleges. The areas to be included are: personal counseling, financial 
aid, dormitory management, health program, student activities and social pro- 
grams; course selection, job placement, college admission and academic reten- 
tion, administration and supervision of the program. (Formerly 15:589) 

Prerequisite: 36-580. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



50 EDUCATION 

36:A650 Research Seminar and Thesis Writing 

During the time that the student is preparing the research document he shall 
enroll in 36:650, Thesis Supervision. This shall entitle him to faculty advisement 
and conferences. If the student does not complete the document during the 
sernester in which he has enrolled for 36:650 he shall be required to re-enroll in 
36:650, but for no credit, each semester until the document is completed. (Former- 
ly 15:650) 

Prerequisite: Approval of advisor. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A654 Field Work and Practicum in Guidance and Counseling 

The aim of the course is to introduce the student to various aspects of guid- 
ance through experience in agencies actually dealing with such problems. Stu- 
dents observe and participate in activities of the agencies to which they are 
assigned and write full accounts of these observations and experiences. Some 
time is spent in discussing and evaluating these experiences and relating them 
to the literature of the subject. (Formerly 15:604) 

Prerequisite: 36:580 and 12 s.h. work in the Personnel Services program. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A655 Field Work and Practicum in Social Work 

The student will be provided with an opportunity to participate in school 
social work in an actual school situation. Diagnostic skills, interviewing tech- 
niques, case recording, individual and group therapy and the team approach 
will be observed and discussed. Under the guidance of a certified, experienced 
school social worker, the student will develop an understanding of the use of 
community resources. The student will be given an opportunity to observe special 
services (school social worker, psychologist, psychiatrist, speech or reading spe- 
cialist, and teacher) in action as together a therapeutic plan is developed for the 
school pupil. (Formerly 15:607) 

Prerequisite: 36-580 and 12 s.h. work in the Personnel Services Program. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

36:A670 Techniques of Evaluation 

This is a core course designed to assure adequate background in the design, 
use, and interpretation of statistical evidence. (Formerly 15:678) 

Prerequisite: Approval of advisor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

36:A680 The Student Personnel Services Team 

This is a core course designed to establish the philosophy, membership,; 
roles, and functions of the various services that compose the Student Personnel 
Services Team. (Formerly 15:610) i 

Prerequisite: Approval of advisor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Department of Special Instructional Areas 



k 



lerfy 



m 



37:A500 The Nature of Reading I |ln;| 

The literacy of a nation is an international as well as a domestic concern I || 
Teachers need an awareness of the conventions and controversies which sur i^j[| 
round the teaching of reading. This course provides the secondary subject arejj |jjj 



EDUCATION 51 

teacher and the beginning reading specialist with a knowledge of the foundations 
of reading. Topics include: the nature of reading, readiness, beginning reading, 
developmental skills, current practices in teaching of reading in the elementary 
schools, and a reappraisal of the place of reading in a changing society. (For- 
merly 15:552) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

37:A501 Techniques of Reading Improvement in the Secondary School 

This is a practical course dealing with popular techniques useful in the im- 
provement of non-clinical reading difficulties found in the content subjects. 
Planned especially for the subject area teacher and the beginning reading spe- 
cialist, a study is made of secondary school reading needs, and specific sugges- 
tions are outlined for guiding the slow, average, and gifted student to success in 
reading up to his capacity in a classroom situation. Through an actual study of the 
more widely used reading workbooks, films, slides, tachistoscopic instruments, 
and texts available in the Reading Laboratory facilities, a practical approach is 
made to building a repertoire of reading skills in many areas. (Formerly 15:553) 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

I 37:A502 Administration and Supervision of Reading Programs 

I This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more complex as- 

! pects of organizing and administering reading programs. It includes such topics 
as: theory and techniques of leadership, program development, organization of 
in-service programs, developing a budget, methods of evaluation, etc. In general, 
this course is aimed at providing essential background for reading specialists to 
establish or administer a functional secondary school reading program. (Formerly 
15:551 N) 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

I 37:A503 Literature for Adolescents 

I Concerned with the interests, attitudes, and reading abilities of contempo- 

j rary youth, this course is designed to provide content area teachers with a back- 
ground for the development of recreational reading programs in junior and senior 
! high schools. Appraisal of literature written for students, as well as literature 
1,; originally intended for adults but read widely by adolescents, is of major con- 
' cern in the course. Related topics include: criteria for book selection, censor- 
ship, role of mass media, minority group identification through books, biblio- 
;r therapy, bibliography, and the importance of the librarian. (Formerly 15:550) 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

ip 37:A504 Reading Needs of the Adult Learner 

^e' This course is designed for teachers of out-of-school youth and adults and 

will cover such topics as; language learning and related psychological factors 
of out-of-school youth and the adult learner; methodology and reading instruction; 

;tef literature and the reading program of out-of-school youth and the adult learner; 
and innovations in reading instruction for out-of-school youth and the adult. (For- 
merly 15:559) 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

37:A505 Research Seminar in Reading 

;e[B,| The course is designed to provide a laboratory situation for the exploration 
jyijand study of problems in the field of reading that have been suggested by the 
2fe3ieducational events and trends of the year, by the interests and responsibilities 



( 



52 EDUCATION 

of the members of the class, and by educational movements in New Jersey, the 
country and the world. Each student will execute an individual research effort 
which he reports to the class. (Formerly 15:659) 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

37:A506 Reading Resources 

Mass media and technology exert immeasurable influence upon students of 
all ages. Teachers need to become cognizant of the value or lack of value of soft- 
ware, hardware, multi-media, and multi-sensory materials available in the schools 
and in adjunct facilities. Philosophic, psychological, and academic considera- 
tions of reading resources will be questioned. Video tape demonstrations of 
materials will enable students to review additional resources. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

37:A509 The Teaching of Communication Skills 

The role of communication skills is of major importance in the learning pro- 
cess. Every teacher should be aware of the abilities, limitations, and needs of stu- 
dents in this area, the adaptations that must be made in curricula, assignments, 
and classroom procedures to the levels of the students in a classroom, and the 
remedial measures that might be taken to improve their status. These communi- 
cation skills include specific areas of speaking, listening, reading and writing. 
Instructors from the departments of Speech, Reading, and English are involved 
in this course. The endeavor is made to have the students gain an understanding 
of the basic principles in each of these fields and their relationship to the teach- 
ing of any subject. (Formerly 15:535) 

Open to M.A.T. and certification students only. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

37:A510 Field Experience in Reading 

The aim of the course is to introduce the student to various aspects of read- 
ing through agencies and programs actually dealing with such problems. Stu- 
dents observe and participate in activities of the agencies to which they are 
assigned and write full accounts of these observations and experiences. Also 
students engaged in long-range research, students who have limited teaching 
experience, and students who need additional field and clinical experience may 
enroll and pursue their ideas with the approval of their advisor. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the advisor to the M.A. program in Reading. 
(Formerly 15:558) 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

37:A511 Case Studies of Reading Difficulties, Part I 

This is a course in learning the techniques that may be used to diagnose 
reading difficulties. After making a thorough study of the most frequently usedr 
tests and inventories, each teacher applies this knowledge to the actual testingj 
of a child with reading problems. Particular attention is given to the unique values! 
of group and individual tests, survey and diagnostic tests, and standardized ancj 
informal tests. Practice in case reporting to parents, schools and agencies 
undertaken. The course is geared to develop skills in diagnosing reading prob: 
lems for individuals which will be used by the clinician for treating remedial ancillliUji 
corrective students. (Formerly 15:554) ■ yi 

Prerequisite: Previous experience in reading courses. liloyfn 

3 semester hours Fall Semeste! 



EDUCATION 53 

37:A513 Corrective and Remedial Reading: Pari I 

The clinical courses in the causation and treatment of reading disability are 
planned for advanced students and specialists who are involved in some aspect 
of remedial instruction. Part I offers an opportunity to extend training by investi- 
gation and interpretation of serious reading problems. A study is made of the 
constellation of causes of reading difficulties. Techniques of remedial and correc- 
tive treatment are projected. In Part II particular attention is paid to the selection 
and adaptation of suitable improvement devices and materials and ideas which 
may enable a disabled reader to improve his reading. Intensive treatment in a 
practicum situation is required. Clients are drawn from the classes in the Reading 
Laboratory. Additional tutoring hours will be arranged. (Formerly 15:556 and 557) 

Prerequisite: Permission from the instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

37:A514 Corrective and Remedial Reading: Part II 

Continuation of 37:A513. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

37:A550 Environmental Education 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the students with the historical 
and philosophical development of outdoor-conservation-environmental education 
programs. Different kinds of programs and program emphasis will be discussed 
as well as the need for and application of environmental education in today's 
educational structure. Communities and facilities currently involved in environ- 
mental education programs will be identified, and model program materials will 
be studied. (Formerly 15:571) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

37:A551 Conservation Education 

This course is designed to give prospective teachers and supervisors an 
understanding of current conservation and ecological problems. Identification 
of natural resources, current management practices, and local, state, national and 
international relationships will be brought out. Field trips, laboratory experiences, 
visual aids, printed materials and visiting specialists combine to make this a use- 
ful background course for all teachers. (Formerly 15:572) 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

37:A555 Curriculum for Environmental Education 

Techniques and procedures for the development of curriculum guides and 
materials for teaching environmental education to all grade levels are the goals 

J of the course. Emphasis will be placed upon each student's developing materials 
which may be put into use in his local school program. The selection, preparation 
and application of materials pertaining to environmental education will be cov- 
ered. Curriculum materials and teaching aids from education and commercial 
sources will be surveyed and demonstrated. (Formerly 15:573) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

37:A560 Practicum in Environmental Education 

This course is designed to provide teachers and supervisors with a back- 
ground of experience and knowledge which will enable them to develop, organize, 
implement and conduct environmental education programs in their own communi- 

I 



54 EDUCATFON 

ties. Through observation of, and participation in ongoing environmental educa- 
tion programs, and through use of an extensive library of environmental education 
materials, students will be expected to formulate an environmental education 
program for their community consisting of teaching units, activities, lists of teach- 
ing aids, and a rationale for implementing same in their school system. (Formerly 
15:444) 

Prerequisite: 37:550, 37:551, 37:555, and 34:503. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



Department of Technology in Education 

38:A400 Selection and Utilization of Audio-Visual Materials 

Sources, selection, and evaluation of audiovisual aids are studied in this 
course. Techniques in developing individual reference catalogs of audio-visual 
aids and the production of school-made aids are stressed. The use of the latest 
audio-visual equipment is demonstrated. (Formerly 15:408) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

38:A520 Production of Audio-Visual Instructional Materials: Part I 
Non-Projected Materials 

Part I deals with non-projected materials, such as drawings, charts and 
graphs, bulletin boards, feltboards, maps, demonstrations, exhibits and displays, 
dioramas, 3-dimensional models, etc. (Formerly 15:568) 

Prerequisite: 38:400. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

38:A521 Production of Audio-Visual Instructional Materials: Part II 
Projected and Audio Materials 

Part II includes production of projected and audio materials, such as slides, 
filmstrips, opaques, transparencies, magnetic tapes, motion pictures, etc. (For- 
merly 15:569) 

Prerequisite: 38:400. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

38:A540 Television Production Seminar 

A combination lecture, laboratory, seminar course in which students gain 
various experiences in television studio production: television camera operation, 
basic principles of lighting, sound for television, elements of television set design, 
functions of floor director, control room operations and basic television directing. 
(Formerly 15:566) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

38:A541 Television Programming Seminar 

A combination lecture, laboratory, seminar experience in which students gain; 
various experiences in the programming of ideas for television, the creative con- 
cept, pre-planning, executing the visual idea and evaluating the visual presenta-l 
tion. Local and commercial television programs are examined. (Formerly 1 5:567) |l 
3 semester hours Spring Sem ester iifinj 



FINE ARTS 55 

SCHOOL OF FINE & PERFORMING ARTS 
Department of Fine Arts 

24:A100 Introduction to the Visual Arts 

The ways in which man has expressed himself in the many forms of the visual 
arts including painting, ceramics, sculpture, weaving, print making, architecture, 
the theatre, motion pictures and photography are explored through studio work, 
demonstrations by artists and craftsmen, reading, discussion and trips to art 
sources. Emphasis is placed upon the development of an understanding of the 
nature of art and the experience of art, their significance to the individual, and 
their role in a culture. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24:A302 Foundations of Method in Art Education 

The content of this course includes a study of research findings of the pat- 
tern of child development in plastic and graphic media; the organization and pre- 
sentation of art experience to the children of grades one through twelve; the re- 
lationship of art to other areas of the curriculum; and the role of the arts in the 
extra-curricular program within the school and the community. Practical aspects 
of teaching art including materials and tools and their sources, cost, care, and 
organization are studied. 

Required of fine arts majors. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A4D6 A, B, C or D Photography: A Contemporary Art Form I, II, III, or IV 

The content is predominantly creative, using the technical materials as a 
medium of expression and experimentation. The work of leading contemporary 
artists using photography as an art medium is studied. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

24:A408 Multi-Media 

This course will present an opportunity to bring together previous fine arts 
experience in painting, sculpture and various aspects of theater arts. The proj- 
ects will be architectural and environmental in nature and will serve to introduce 
the student to both historical and contemporary ideas of total-art. 

For art majors or other advanced students. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A410 Selected Masterpieces of World Art 

Designed for non-art majors, this introductory course studies key works of art 
representing prehistoric cultures, the ancient world, the East, the Renaissance, 
and the modern period, in reference to their historical and cultural settings and 
the personality of the artist. The course employs illustrated lectures, museum and 
gallery trips, readings and discussion. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

24:A412 Art of the Nineteenth Century 

This course explores the major art movements of the Nineteenth Century in 
iterms of the changes of social, political, and artistic institutions and ideas and in- 



56 FINE ARTS 

terests of the leading artist personalities. The rise of Classicism, Romanticism 
and Realism; the salon at midcentury; and the Impressionists and Post-Impres- 
sionists are discussed as well. The work of this period is studied through illus- 
trated lectures, museum trips, reading and discussion. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A419 A or B Life Drawing I or II 

A study of the structure and proportions of the human form with emphasis on 
expressiveness of drawing. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24:A511 A, B, C or D Painting 

Studio in painting is designed to further the creative impression and tech- 
nical knowledge of the student in various painting media. Emphasis will be upon 
the personal and professional development through studio work, trips, and the 
study of the contemporary artists. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24:A521 A , B, C or D Sculpture 

In these courses the student is expected to explore independently one or 
two materials and techniques and to begin to find his own directions as a sculptor. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24:A531 A, B, C or D Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture 

This course is designed for continued experimentation with the potter's 
wheel, various handbuilding methods of forming and further experimentation with 
clay compositions, glazes and methods of firing. 

Advanced students will be held responsible for developing a consumate 
craftsmanship and a personal idiom. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate experience in ceramics, portfolio or instructor's 
approval. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

24:A543 A, B, C or D Decoration of Fabrics 

In this area major emphasis is on designing of the fabric through block print- 
ing, silk screen printing, stitchery, hooking, applique, and dyeing techniques. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A552 A, B, C or D Woodcut Printing 

This course explores the fine art of the woodcut, and its relation to painting 
in color, size, and richness. The cutting of various woods and veneers is fully 
demonstrated. Different approaches of printing and inventiveness in using other 
materials in relation to wood are fully explored. The course includes lectures on 
prints of the past and field trips to important print exhibitions. 

Prerequisite: Fine Arts major or permission of instructor. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester! 

24:A553 A, B, C or D Lithography 

This course is designed to provide opportunity for the student to acquire! 
competency in the art of lithography. All steps from design and execution of mas- 



FINE ARTS 57 

ter drawing to the finished print are covered. Studio experiences provide the 
student with first hand knowledge of tools, materials, and techniques of the litho- 
graphic process. Adaptation of the lithographic phase of print-making to class- 
room use is also studied. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A590 Modern Philosophies of Art 

The work of the major writers in art in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries 
is examined. Exploration is made in the nature of the creative experience, the 
function of art in the life of the individual and of society, the nature of the creative 
process, the rise of new materials, and institutions and sentiments affecting cur- 
rent thinking in the field. Discussions are based on readings of philosophers, 
poets, social scientists, psychologists, and artists. 

For fine arts majors only. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

24:A591 Selected Problems in Art History 

This is a seminar course dealing with selected art problems of historic, so- 
cial and philosophic nature. Some of the following topics are chosen for a de- 
tailed examination: the human figure in the history of art; the rise of landscape 
painting; Impressionism in the East and West; historical views of art criticism; 
the self-portrait; Romanticism and Realism; art and society; the art market; the 
relation of the sciences; and the rise of the "Isms." Methods of dealing with 
selected topics include lectures, readings, reports and discussions. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

24:A603 Seminar in Art 

This course is designed primarily to afford the graduate student an oppor- 
tunity to make an extensive study in the field of art. 

Prerequisite: 15:503. 

The seminar extends through the Fall and Spring semesters. Within this 
period, each student will carry out either A or B : 

A. WRITTEN PROJECT. The student will enroll, with the approval of the 
graduate advisor, in this course. Approval should be secured in the spring or 
summer before fall enrollment. 

B. CREATIVE PROJECT. Prerequisite: At least one course in the chosen 
studio area, during which course the student must secure: 1. approval of the in- 
structor as to competence in the medium; 2. agreement by one particular faculty 

i member to serve as personal advisor throughout the creative project; and 3. 
\ approval of the departmental graduate advisor. Upon such approval, the student 

will enroll forthe subsequent fall semester in the course 24:603. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 



58 INTER-ARTS-MUSIC 

Inter-Arts Service Courses 

57:A400 History of the Cinema as Art 

To acquaint the student with the historical development of the motion picture 
as an art form, from its earliest stages as a laboratory curiosity until the present. 
To analyze the technical, social, economic and cultural factors which have in- 
fluenced this development. 

For Art majors or other advanced students. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Department of Music 

60:A100 Introduction to Music 

This course aims to enlarge the student's horizon of musical awareness. 
Emphasis is placed upon stimulating the enjoyment of music rather than on build- 
ing up a body of facts about it. By means of live musical performance and by 
directed listening to recorded music the student becomes acquainted with music 
which should be the possession of every educated person. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A320 Teaching Music in the Elementary Grades K-6 

Principles, techniques, materials and methods used in teaching music in the 
elementary grades. It includes a study of the child voice, remedial aids for off- 
pitch singers, rote song procedures, rhythms, creativity, discriminate listening, 
development of music reading, and the beginning instrumental program in the 
primary grades. 

Prerequisite: 60:202. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A406 Modern Music 

A study of the several musical styles of the twentieth century, the major com- 
posers in those styles, historical sources for them, and recent trends. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A425 The Literature of the Orchestra 

An historical survey of such genres as the suite, overture, concerto, sym- 
phony, tone poem et al. from the development of an orchestral style of playing in 
the seventeenth century to the present. (Formerly: Masters of the Symphony) 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A500 Independent Study in Music 

The undertaking of course work in one of the regularly listed catalog 
courses of the Department of Music (but not to include Applied Music) in a depth 
greater than that normally pursued in the course. Students will arrange the nature 
of the work with the instructor prior to the second meeting of the course. 

Written permission for 60:500 must be obtained from the Graduate Advisor for 
Music prior to registration. Independent study may be elected more than once 
during the graduate program, but may apply to only one course per semester. 

3 or 4 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



MUSIC 59 

60:A501 Private Study in Composition I 

Advanced work in the area of musical composition in forms and genres de- 
termined jointly by the teacher and the student. Admission by permission only. 
15 private lessons per semester. 

Special Fee: (see page 33) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A502 Private Study in Composition II 

Continuation of 60:501. 
Special Fee: (see page 33) 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A503 A & B Applied Music I & II: Primary Instrument 

Study of performance in the student's major area of expression in a manner 
suited to those specializing in the areas of Music Education of Theory-Composi- 
tion. Fifteen one-hour lessons, private instruction. 

Admission by permission only. 

Special Fee: (see page 33) 
2 semester hours each Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A504 and A505 Applied Music III & IV: Primary Instrument 

Intensive study in the major performing area for students majoring in Applied 
Music. Two recitals of professional caliber are to be prepared as a result of the 
two semesters of work. Admission by audition only, and open only to majors in 
Applied Music. Fifteen one-hour lessons per semester. 

Special Fee: (see page 33) 
6 semester hours each Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A506, A507, & A508 Applied Music V, VI, & VII: Primary Instrument 

Intensive study in the major area of performance similar to that offered under 
60:504 and 505, but spread over three semesters of work instead of two. Open to 
students in Applied Music, each of whom must audition. Fifteen one-hour lessons 
per semester. 

Special Fee: (see page 33) 

4 semester hours each Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A510A Applied Music A: Secondary Instrument 

An elementary course, for both the beginner and the student with limited 
background. Fifteen half-hour lessons per semester, private instruction. 

Admittance with permission only. 

Special Fee: (see page 33) 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

60:A510B Applied Music B: Secondary Instrument 

Continuation of 60:A501A. 
! Special Fee: (see page 33) 

12 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A511 Theoretical and Aural Skills in Music: I 

A study of the principles and practice of music construction, aural skills in 
manipulating pitch and rhythm, and related structural analysis. The total spectrum 
of music is used as a base, with specific techniques of pitch and rhythm control ap- 

lll 



60 MUSIC 

preached from both harmonic and contrapunctal standpoints. Areas of study in- 
clude primitive and simple folk idioms, modal counterpoint in two and three parts, 
diatonic tonal harmony in vocal and instrumental styles, tonal counterpoint in two 
parts, and free composition. 

Open to music majors only. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A512 Theoretical and Aural Skills in Music II 

Continuation of 60:511, including more complex non-Western systems, modal 
and tonal imitative counterpoint in three and four parts, chromatic tonal harmony, 
and the expanded resources and techniques of the twentieth century. 

Prerequisite: 60:511 or the equivalent, the latter to be determined by the in- 
structor or the graduate advisor for Music. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A519 The Kodaly System in Music Education 

An examination of the procedures involved in using the Kodaly materials and 
techniques in teaching music reading and comprehension. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A520B Problems and Materials of Choral Music 

A survey of the choral repertoire for accompanied and unaccompanied 
groups, and for changing, unchanged, and mixed voices. Criteria for evaluating 
materials and for program building. Members of class constitute a laboratory 
chorus. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A521B Classroom Methods: Brass 

Elementary and secondary classroom methods in the medium, dealing with 
principles, materials and methods in teaching groups of students. Especially de- 
signed for teachers wishing to exchange or learn new approaches to classroom 
techniques. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A525 An Ethnological Approach to Music 

A study of music outside the area of Western art music. Included is exam- 
ination of ethnic roots and influences, theory, media, and performance practices. 
Both folk and professional idioms of the Far East, Near East, Africa, Europe, and 
the Americas will be considered. Study for non-majors will emphasize musical 
experience and social-cultural background, while music majors will also pursue 
a more technical approach. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A531 Ensemble: Chorus I 

Rehearsal and performance in conventional choral media. 
Admission by permission only. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

60:A532 Ensemble: Chorus 11 

The second semester of 50:531. Rehearsal and performance in conventional 
choral media. 

Admission by permission only. 
2 semester hours Spring Semesterl 



MUSIC/SPEECH AND THEATER 61 

60:A533 Ensemble: Opera Workshop I 

Rehearsal and performance of operatic repertoire in English or in English 
translation. 

Admission by audition only; Nov. 1-5, 1971. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A540 Master Class in Musical Performance: Italian Vocal Literature 

Coaching in groups of small numbers of students in refinements of perform- 
ance, including stylistic interpretation, programming, interpretive analysis, diction, 
etc. 

Open through audition only to both vocalists and pianists. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

60:A600 Independent Study In Music 

Individual pursuit of a research topic culminating in a written document of 
the length and scholarly integrity of a Master's Thesis. This study will be under- 
taken free of any course structure. The student's area of study and pursuit of re- 
search will, however, be arranged with the Graduate Advisor and a course ad- 
visor appointed by him prior to the semester in which the student registers for in- 
dependent study. The work for this course may be spread over two semesters, in 
which case the student should register only for the semester in which the work 
will be completed. 

Written permission for registration from the Graduate Advisor for music is 
required. 
4 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

Department of Speech & Theater 

21:A100 Fundamentals of Speech 

Effective voice production and clear, pleasing diction are developed through 
speech activities. The work is adapted to individual needs as related by record- 
ings and diagnostic tests. The work rnay include prescribed additional practice 
in the speech laboratory. Failure to achieve an acceptable standard of perform- 
ance results in the withholding of credit until the student demonstrates satis- 
factory achievement. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

21:A150 The Art & History of Radio & Television 

An overview of the development, organization, and operation of radio and 
television in modern society. Social and cultural influences of commercial and 
educational broadcasting. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

21:A204 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

The student studies techniques for preparing and delivering effective, in- 
formative, persuasive, and entertaining speeches. He is given special opportuni- 
ties to address the class to enter into formal critiques and to moderate one pro- 
gram. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

21:A440 Theater History: Classical to Elizabethan 

This course is designed to offer the student a comprehensive view of the de- 
velopment of the theater from the classical Greek through the Elizabethan period. 
j|J Special attention is placed upon plays and playwrights of the period, theater 



62 SPEECH AND THEATER 

architecture, scenery, costuming, styles of acting and presentation of each period. 
Course work includes oral reports, lectures, and classroom demonstrations. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

21:A500 Independent Study in Speech and Theater 

The undertaking of course work in one of the regularly listed catalog courses 
of the Department of Speech and Theater in a depth greater than that normally 
pursued in the course. 

Students will arrange the nature of the work with the instructor prior to the 
second meeting of the course. 

Written permission must be obtained from the Graduate Advisor for Speech 
and Theater prior to registration. Independent Study may be elected more than 
once during the graduate program. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

21:A501 Survey of Research Methods 

A survey of the various approaches to research in rhetorical theory, public 
address, interpersonal communication, mass communication, theater history, 
dramatic production and the contemporary theatrical idiom. Specific attention 
is given to historical, critical, descriptive, quantitative and experimental models 
and methodologies. Individual student needs and interests are respected. 

Prerequisite: 21 :100, 21 :204, 21 :356, or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

21:A502 Theater Management 

A course dealing with the theater as a business enterprise. Various kinds of 
production units will be discussed, box-office procedures, standard contractual 
arrangements, unions and their regulations, subscription management. Special 
consideration will be given to the manager as a community relations specialist, 
with emphasis on publicity and the theater's role as a community resource. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

21:A552 Internship in Dramatic Production 

This course offers the student practical experience in dramatic production 
under the supervision of a staff member of a professional, semi-professional, com- 
munity or educational theater, on or off campus. The student will work as an as- 
sistant to the director, costumer or makeup supervisor. A contract of studies will 
be drawn between the supervisor and student. 

Prerequisite— 12 s. h. in acting-direction-costume makeup. 

Application through the Department prior to registration. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

21:A553 Internship in Oral Communication 

Students are given off campus assignments in practicum settings. The as- 
signments will range from serving on campaign speaker's/public speaker's speech 
staff to aiding a high school or college forensic program by coaching students 
and/or conducting forensic tournaments. Amount of time spent in practicum 
setting is variable, and made by arrangement Every effort is made to provide 
students with a broad, balanced and locally supervised experience. 

Prerequisite: Public Speaking, Group Discussion, Argumentation and De- 
bate, Contemporary Public Address on Graduate Level. Permission of Instructor. 

Application through the Department prior to registration. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



1 



SPEECH AND THEATER 



63 



21:A554 Internship in Radio & Television Communication 

Students are given off campus assignments in practicum settings. For the 
most part, these will consist of radio and television broadcasting facilities, but 
other learning sites may be considered. Amount of time spent in practicum set- 
ting is variable, and made by arrangement. Every effort is made to provide stu- 
dents with a broad, balanced and locally supervised experience. 

Prerequisite: 21 :150, 21 :250, and Instructor's permission. 

Application through the Department prior to registration. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

21:A563 Scenic Design 

An advanced course in designing for the stage. 
Prerequisite: 21 :308 or Instructor's approval of portfolio. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

21:A565 Advanced Oral Interpretation 

This course is designed to provide further study of techniques in interpreta- 
tion of poetry and prose. Extensive practice is provided in the analysis and pres- 
entation of various types of literary material (short story, ballad, narrative, sonnet, 
etc.) suitable for use in the classroom and for special programs. 

Prerequisite: 21 :106 or Instructor's approval. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 




64 ENGLISH 

SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 
Department of English 

20:A105 Composition and Literature I 

Reading selected literary works from different periods and cultures to pro- 
vide basis for principles and methods of expository writing; a substantial number 
of writing assignments required to provide practice in both composition and lit- 
erary analysis. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

20:A106 Composition and Literature II 

Skills developed in 20:105 utilized in criticizing representative selections of 
literature typifying the major cultural epochs of the Western world; in addition to 
frequent writing assignments, a research paper dealing with some aspect of the 
literature required. 

Prerequisite: 20A105. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

20:A160 Art of Poetry 

Critical consideration of problems of defining and evaluating poetry, repre- 
sentative selections, illustrative of critical points, established, discussed; char- 
acteristics of different types of poetry representative major poets in historical 
perspective. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A246 Renaissance Literature 

Major non-dramatic writers of Elizabethan and early seventeenth century 
England; the poetry and prose of such figures as Sydney, Spenser, Lyiy, Nashe, 
Greene, Donne, and Browne with respect to their individual contributions and to 
the way in which they reflect the literary and philosophic preoccupations of the 
period. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A260 Myth and Literature 

Selected primitive and classical myths studied comparatively with emphasis 
on some of the major motifs and archetypes; selected literary works analyzed to 
illustrate function of myth and the myth-making process in literature; theories 
about origins of myths considered. 
3-semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A274 Modern Drama: Ibsen to O'Neill 

Representative plays studied for individual merit and for unique contribu- 
tions to the development of modern drama; critical insinht and historical perspec- 
tive emphasized as keys to understanding and appreciation. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A334 American Drama 

Dramas by American authors chosen for their excellence or as being particu- 
larly representative of a significant era or movement in the theater. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester! 



ENGLISH 65 

20:A346 Nineteenth Century English Romantic Literature 

The Romantic revolt with major attention in poetry to Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Shelley, Byron and Keats; in prose to the essays of Hazlitt, DeQuincey and Lamb. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A364 Contemporary Poetry: Auden to Present 

Distinctive poetry movements since the Imagists through study in depth of 
representative poets; critical appreciation developed through comparison of di- 
verse styles, themes, and poetic theories. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A375 Film and Society 

Film studies as art form, social force, educational device, entertainment 
medium; history of motion pictures, film techniques, scenario as literary type; 
numerous films shown. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A485 Teaching English in the Secondary School 

Methods of handling problems in listening, speaking, reading, and writing 
to secure best responses from junior and senior high school students; textbooks 
and all tools of learning examined and evaluated; unit and daily lesson plans 
analyzed and made. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A501 Anglo-Saxon 

Both the literature and the language of the Anglo-Saxon era are stressed. 
Specimens of alliterative poetry, including excerpts from Beowulf, and of relig- 
ious prose and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle are read as literary art and as mile- 
stones in the history of English writing. Structure and vocabulary are investigated 
as the pedestals upon which rests the edifice of modern English. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A502 Victorian Poets 

The most important English poets who wrote during the transition from the 

\^ictorian to the modern period are read, analyzed, and discussed: Rossetti, Swin- 

Durne, Hardy, Bridges, G. M. Hopkins, Francis Thompson, A. E. Housman, Kipling, 

and Yeats. 

s 3 semester hours Spring Semester 

I >0:A506 John Milton 

The understanding and evaluation of Milton's poems are primary aims. Con- 

., ributory are the following: Milton's literary heritage and influence, his position 

)f leadership in the Puritan struggle for civil and religious liberty as revealed in 

lis prose writings, and biographical materials. 

} semester hours Spring Semester 

!0:A510 Wordsworth and Coleridge 

Since Wordsworth and Coleridge reflect all the cultural currents of the Ro- 
lantic era, this course approaches the aesthetic and intellectual life of that age 
hrough the poems, essays, lectures, philosophical writings, and letters of Col- 
sridge and Wordsworth. It also considers portions of the vast body of Wordsworth 
"^"'ijind Coleridge scholarship. 

semester hours Fall Semester 



66 ENGLISH 

20:A511A Lrterary Criticism to 1800 

Plato, Aristotle, Horace, Longinus, and their imitators and "interpreters" in 
the Medieval, Renaissance, and Neo-Classical periods. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A511B Literary Criticism from 1800 to the Present 

The break from classical theory (notably by the Romantics) and the search, 
principally in our own day, for new definitions of the function of literature by means 
of new materials and methods: biographical, psychological, aesthetic, archetypal, 
bibliographical, and computerized analysis, among others. 

Prerequisite: 511 A or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A512 The History of the English Language 

Concerned with the historical background necessary for an understanding 
of the English language as it is spoken and written today, the course emphasizes 
the following areas of study: the nature and origin of language; the ancestry of 
English; the early growth of English; sources of the vocabulary and the making of 
words; changing meanings and values of words; syntax and usage; concern with 
dictionaries, spelling, pronunciation, variations, and standards in the modern 
period. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A518 Byron, Shelley, Keats 

Byron and Shelley are studied as culminations of earlier traditions in poetry 
and thought and as revolutionary innovators reflecting the principal concerns of 
their time; Keats as the first modern poet and a poet whose work is timeless. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A521 Seminars in British Writers: D. H. Lawrence 

This is a seminar in a single author studied in depth. The author to be studied 
this semester is D. H. Lawrence. I 

3 semester hours Spring Semester, 

20:A525 Poe, Hawthorne, Melville 

American literature from 1789 to the present is examined. Beginning with, 
the poetry of the early nineteenth century, the course traces the rise and develop 
ment of Romanticism and Realism and concludes with an example of Americar 
Naturalism. 
3 semester hours Fall Semesteii 

20:A529 Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman 

Three of the transcendental mainstream. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 

20:A535B Johnson, Gray, Goldsmith 

English neoclassicism in the mid-eighteenth century. Some of the genre! 
covered include biography, critical prose, poetry, drama. Some emphasis on thf 
articulation of this period with the Romantic Period. 
3 semester hours Fall Semestci 



ENGLISH/FOREIGN LANGUAGES 67 

20:A536 Modern American Poetry 

This course examines such poets as Emily Dickinson, Hart Crane, Wallace 
Stevens, Robert Frost, Amy Lowell, and William Carlos Williams. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A539 Theater and Society 

Dramatic expression from ancient Greece to the present is studied to ob- 
serve and appreciate social, political, and ethical trends reflected in the drama. 
Social trends in contemporary drama receive special attention. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

20:A544A Shakespeare: Tragedies 

A review of classical and medieval theories of tragedy as a "measuring-stick" 
for examining Shakespeare's own approach to the form; an examination of Sene- 
can devices and of the devices used by Shakespeare's contemporaries; a study 
of Shakespeare's sources for his plots and, particularly, a study of Elizabethan 
theories of rhetoric. 
j3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A555 Ibsen, Strindberg, and Shaw 

The three great forerunners of twentieth century drama are studied inten- 
sively. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

20:A603 English Research Writing 

I An exercise in original research using the routines and techniques of the 
lEnglish field. 

; 3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

Department of French 

I1:A100A Beginning French I 

These courses are designed for students who desire to start French in col- 
ege. Special emphasis is placed on training the student to understand, speak, 
ead and write the language. Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the 
;ourses. 

Prerequisite: Fr. 100A for Fr. 100B or equivalent, 
semester hours Fall Semester 

1:A100B Beginning French M 

A continuation of Beginning French I. 
semester hours Spring Semester 

1:A200A Intermediate French I 

These courses which form a continuation of Fr. 100A and 100B are also open 
) students who wish to minor in French but who lack the language proficiency 
;ecessary for Fr. 101 and 102, courses designed for majors and selected minors, 
^jaboratory work is part of the requirements for the courses. 

Prerequisite: Fr. 100B for Fr. 200A and Fr. 200A for Fr. 200B, or equivalent. 
Isemester hours Fall Semester 



68 FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

41:A200B Intermediate French II 

A continuation of Intermediate French I 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

41:A505 History of the French Language 

The course is designed to acquaint the student on the graduate level with 
the developmental processes in language with special reference to French. It 
examines also the relationship between language change and cultural change. 
The French language is studied from its origins to the present time with units in 
Vulgar Latin, Old French, Middle French, Renaissance French, and Modern 
French. At each step, development of phonology, morphology, and vocabulary 
are studied along with social backgrounds. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

41:A513 Medieval Theater 

The evaluation of the theater in France during the Middle Ages is studied. 
Special emphasis is placed on the Mysteres, Miracles, Farces and their social 
implications. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

41:A526 Carneille and Racine 

This course is designed to acquaint students on a graduate level with the 
evolution of the classical theater in the Seventeenth Century. The dramatic art, 
psychology, and symbolism of Corneille and Racine will be analyzed through 
extensive reading and intensive discussion of their major plays. The student will 
be asked to evaluate the impact of these plays in written and oral reports. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

41:A532 French Theater of the 18th Century 

This course requires extensive readings and analysis of the major plays o 
the time by Voltaire, Lesage, Marivaux, and Beaumarchais. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 

41:A543 The Contemporary Poets 

This course considers the development of French poetry from Symbolism t(! 
Surrealism and will include works from such poets as Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Ver 
laine, Mallarme, Laforgue, Nerval, Apollinaire, Saint-John Perse, Supervielle 
Eluart and Aragon. The aim of this course is to convey to the students a deepe 
appreciation of French poetry through a literary and historical approach and th, 
study of the fundamentals: versification, the technical side of poetry and imagerjj 
the language of poetry. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



41:A544 The Contemporary Novel I 

This course is designed to acquaint students of advanced level with tM 
history and development of the French novel from Proust to the present da 
Major currents and trends are analyzed; works of modern novelists, includirjl^jj^ 
Proust, Gide, Malraux, Sartre, and Camus are read and discussed. ^ 

3 semester hours Fall Semesttj 



ik 
Id 

k 

ri 



J 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 69 

Department of Spanish 

46:A100A Beginning Spanish I 

These courses are designed for students who desire to start Spanish in 
college. Emphasis is placed on the training of the students to understand, speak, 
read, and write the language. Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the 
courses. 

Prerequisite: Span. 100A for Span. 100B or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

46:A100B Beginning Spanish II 

A continuation of Beginning Spanish I. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

46:A200A Intermediate Spanish I 

i These courses which form a continuation of Span. 100A and 100B are also 

' open to students who wish to minor in Spanish but lack the language proficiency 

necessary for Span. 101, 102, courses designed for majors and selected minors. 
Prerequisite: Span. 100B for Span. 200A and Span. 200A for Span. 200B, or 

equivalent. 
1 3 semester hours Fall Semester 

46:A200B Intermediate Spanish II 

A continuation of Intermediate Spanish I. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

46:A505 History of the Spanish Language 

A survey of the development of the Spanish language from its origin to the 
present day in Spain and Spanish America. The course traces the phonological, 
structural and lexical evolution of Spanish from its Latin ancestor, by following the 
process of its transformation, as well as the various stages through which the 
language has passed from the time of its first documentary appearance. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

46:A516 Survey of Medieval Spanish Literature 

A review of outstanding works and themes from Latin, Arabic, and Hebrew 

oots— expressing the main features of Spanish literature, culture, and thought 

. rem the eleventh century "Jarchas" and "Cantarcillos de amigo" through the 

^oema del Cid and culminating in La Celestina and the advent of the Golden Age. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

16:A524 Seminar in Cervantes 

The course is designed to study Cervantes as a figure of synthesis in the art 

)f the novel in Spain. El Quijote, the Novelas Ejemplares and Persiles y Segis- 

5'' nunda will be analyzed. Oral and written reports will be prepared by the student. 

I semester hours Fall Semester 

f ^6:A533 Contemporary Spanish Theater 

The most representative plays from Benavente to Sastre are read and an- 
joii Jyzed. Particular attention will be given to a critical study of the evolution of the 
heater in light of the style, technique and thought of these playwrights. 
semester hours Fall Semester 



70 FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

46:A540 Sarmiento and His Times 

The purpose of this course is the study of the culture and civilization of the 
Rio de la Plata region and Chile from the period of Independence to the begin- 
ning of "Modernismo" through the most important figure of this period. Relations 
with the United States will be discussed. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

46:A543 Spanish-American Theater of the 20th Century 

The most representative dramatists after Florencio Sanchez and to Rene 
Marques and Carlos Solorzano are read and analyzed. Particular attention will 
be given to the new trends in Spanish-American Theater in Europe and U.S.A. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

46:A546 Seminar in Modernismo 

A critical re-evaluation of the "Modernist" phase of Spanish-American 
poetry: 1882-1917. Special emphasis will be given to individual techniques and 
characteristic use of specific images, the reliance on Synesthesia, and the at- 
tempt to incorporate pictorial elements into poetry which welded these individuals 
into a genuine poetic movement. Each participant is expected to present a piece 
of original research at a designated time during the course-term. 

Prerequisite: 46:545. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

46:A550 Spanish-American Theater to 1910 

A study of the most significant dramatical works of Spanish America from 
the pre-Columbian times through Florencio Sanchez's theater. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

46:A603 Spanish Research Seminar 

This seminar is designed primarily to provide an opportunity for graduate 
students in Spanish to investigate and apply the techniques of research in the 
foreign language field. 

Prerequisite: Educ. 503 and matriculation for M.A. degree in Spanish. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semester? 



Department of Italian 

49:A100A Beginning Italian I 

This course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of Italiai 
and aims at imparting the basic foundation in the language. Its purpose is t< 
afford the required background in the language in order to embark on eithe 
minor or concentration in Italian. 

Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the course. 
3 semester hours Fall Semeste 

49:A100B Beginning Italian M 

A continuation of Beginning Italian I. I 

Prerequisite: 49:A100A or equivalent. ^ 

3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES/PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 71 

49:A200A Intermediate Italian I 

This course is designed for students who have a knowledge of the Italian 
language that is at least equivalent to two years of study in High-School or the 
Beginning Italian course. Its aim is to strengthen further the four language skills, 
i.e. understanding, speaking, reading and writing through an essentially audio- 
lingual approach. Laboratory work is part of the requirements for the course. 

Prerequisite: Italian 100B for Italian 200A and Italian 200A for Italian 200B, 
or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

49:A200B Intermediate Italian II 

A continuation of Intermediate Italian I. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Department of Philosophy and Religion 

63:A100 Introduction to Philosophy 

A systematic inquiry into the nature, scope, methods, basic problems and 
major types of philosophy. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

63:A190 Introduction to Religion 

An introduction to the basic religious questions and problems of mankind 
and to the various ways in which men have given intellectual, moral, and institu- 
tional expression to their convictions. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

63:A475 Oriental Religions 

A comparative study of the cultural and theological bases for the faith and 
practice of the major Eastern religions— Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, 
Islam, Taoism. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



I 



72 BIOLOGY 

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES 
Department of Biology 

81:A410 Biological Science Demonstrations 

The opportunity is given to gain experience in the use of equipment, sup- 
plies, and teaching aids so essential to the operation of a successful laboratory 
and class. The laboratory is devoted to working out of individual and group ex- 
periments and demonstrations. A considerable library of techniques is devel- 
oped. 

Prerequisite: One year of biology. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

81 :A461 Limnology 

A study of the principles and techniques used in the study of rivers and lakes. 
Biological and physical processes are considered. Field work will be done in local 
bodies of water. 

Prerequisites: Geology, Chemistry, Biology. 

(2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory). 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

81:A514 Biology and the Problems of Society 

The student will prepare an in-depth report on a current problem and will 
present it to this seminar group. 

Prerequisite: Bachelor's degree with a major in biology. 

(2 hours lecture). » 

Meets alternate weeks all year. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

81:A530 Animal Behavior 

How animals adjust and adapt to stimuli in their external and internal en- 
vironment, the neuro-muscular and hormonal mechanisms involved, their ontogeny 
and phylogeny. (No lab.) 

Prerequisites: A year course in invertebrate and vertebrate zoology and an 
introductory course in general psychology. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



3s. 
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81:A550X Topics in Microbiology 

The course will present selected topics in microbiology of special interest 
from both a theoretical and technological point of view, such as microbial metabo- 
lism, microbial cell-free systems, genetics, antibiotic action, bacteriophage, virus 
and cancer, etc. The course orientation will be flexible in terms of student needs. 

Prerequisite: General Microbiology, Organic Chemistry, Cell Biology, Inter- 
mediary Metabolism and Advanced Bacteriology are desirable. (4 hours lecture) 
3 semester hours Spring Semestei ' °2:A 



81 :A570 Ecology 

This course considers basic ecological principles and concepts. The habita* 
approach is followed with appropriate field exercises in fresh water, marine anc 
terrestrial ecology. Intra and interspecific relationships are stressed with ail livinj 



Mi 
f 



BIOLOGY/CHEMISTRY 73 

members of the ecosystem. Practical applications of quantitative and qualitative 
methods will be stressed. In every case the role of man in relation to his en- 
vironment will be central. Each student will choose a problem in either plant or 
animal ecology and do appropriate research in field and library. 

Prerequisite: General Botany, General Zoology, Plant Taxonomy or Equiva- 
lent, some physical science. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Department of Chemistry 

80:A505 Research Seminar in Science 

This course is designed to afford opportunity for graduate students in science, 
supervisors, and science teachers: (1) to investigate research in science educa- 
tion; (2) to organize science experiences and science information with the teach- 
ing materials for the public schools. Each member of the group selects a project. 
This project must be presented to the science faculty and graduate students for 
evaluation. 

Prerequisite: Matriculation for M.A. degree in science, concurrent registra- 
tion in 15:503, or permission of the instructor. 

Meets alternate weeks all year. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

82:A100 Introductory Chemistry 

A non-laboratory survey course in modern chemistry for non-science majors. 
Prerequisite: None. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

82:A521 Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry 

This course is designed for students who have had a course in inorganic 
chemistry at some previous stage of training. It aims at giving to the student a 
sound foundation in the principles of inorganic chemical reactions and the prop- 
erties of inorganic compounds on the basis of structure. In this sense, theories of 
atomic and molecular structure will be stressed, as well as principles of bond 
formation. The idea of periodicity will serve as essential Theoretical foundation 
for the entire course. 

Prerequisite: Advanced inorganic chemistry. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

82:A531 Advanced Theoretical Organic Chemistry 

Modern theories of organic chemistry with emphasis on electronic theory and 
reaction mechanisms. 

Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

82:A544 Electrochemistry 

Principles and application of electro-chemistry as related to research and 
production problems. 

Prerequisite: Organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and calculus C or 
equivalent. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 



74 CHEMISTRY/MATHEMATICS 

82:A548 Chemical Kinetics 

The course material will deal with the utilization of kinetics in its role to 
elucidate reaction mechanisms. Some recent kinetics problems from the chem- 
ical literature will be discussed, thus introducting the student to research in the 
field. 

Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



Department of Mathematics 

50:A101 Introduction to Modem Mathematics 

This course is designed for students whose major interests are in fields 
other than mathematics and science. Emphasis is on basic concepts rather than 
on formal manipulative skills. Topics include: systems of numeration, finite math- 
ematical systems, sets, application of sets to arithmetic, algebra and geometry, 
logic and statements. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A105 Elements of Statistical Reasoning 

This course is designed as a brief introduction to the basic elements of sta- 
tistics designed primarily for those with minimum interest in skill and technique. 
Topics include: systematic organizaton, analysis and presentation of data; prob- 
ability theory for finite sample spaces; a few theoretical frequency distributions; 
simple statistical inference, regression and correlation. 

Students who need a working knowledge of statistics should elect 50:210, 
211-212, 403 or 443. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A110 Introduction to Algebra and Analysis 

This course covers basic material needed for the study of Math 111-112. 
Topics include: sets, relations, functions, development of number systems and 
algebraic operations. Students who have a good understanding of the material 
usually covered in Algebra II, or who have studied more than three years of high 
school mathematics should not select this course. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A111 Mathematics Related to the Social and Management Sciences I 

This course is designed to give an introduction to the mathematical skills and 
concepts most likely to be useful in the Social and Management Sciences. Topics 
include: sequences and series, linear functions, matrices and linear transforma- 
tions, elements of linear programming. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A403 Techniques and Applications of Statistics 

This course is designed as a basic survey of statistical techniques as applied 
in the social and behavioral sciences. Fundamental concepts and assumptions 
are stressed and justified experimentally, although mathematical proof of theor- 
ems is strictly limited. Topics include: descriptive statistics, elements of proba- 
bility, sampling procedures, tests of hypotheses and simple design of experiments. 
Students are expected to have an adequate background in high school algebra. 



J 



MATHEMATICS 75 

This course is offered as a general education elective and may not be taken for 
credit by mathematics majors. 

Prerequisite: 50:105. (Not offered every year) 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A420X Differential Equations 

Applications of differential equations and their standard methods of solution 
are treated in this course. Topics include: linear differential equations of the first 
degree and of the first and higher orders, linear equations of the nth order with 
constant coefficients, linear equations of the second order, exact and total differ- 
ential equations, simultaneous equations, numerical approximations, and series 
solutions. 

Prerequisite: 50:222 or the equivalent. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A425X Advanced Calculus I 

This course develops the calculus of a function of one variable as a mathe- 
matical system. On the basis of postulates for the real numbers, the concepts of 
function, limit, sequence, infinite series, power series, continuity, uniform con- 
tinuity, differentiation, and integration will be rigorously developed. Topics con- 
sidered include: Archimedean principle, density of the rationals, intermediate 
value theorem, Heine-Borek theorem, mean value theorem, Cauchy convergence 
criterion, existence theorems and uniform convergence theorems. 

Prerequisite: 50:222 or the equivalent. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A426X Advanced Calculus II 

This course presents a rigorous treatment of the calculus of functions of 
several variables, together with the development of the theory of Fourier series. 
Topics include: Green's theorem, Stoke's Theorem, Divergence theorem, im- 
plicit function theorem, inverse function theorem, Reimmann-Lebesque lemma 
and Cesaro convergence. 

Prerequisite: 50:425. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A431 Foundations of Modem Algebra 

This course is a study of algebraic structures and the fundamental concepts 
of algebra. Topics include: groups, rings, integral domains, fields and important 
examples of these abstract systems. 

Prerequisite: 50:335. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A450X Foundations of Geometry 

Groups of transformations, the Erianger Program and an introduction to pro- 
jective geometry. 

Prerequisite: 50:350. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A461X Introduction to Computer Science 

This course includes: basic theory of digital computers; techniques of pro- 



76 MATHEMATICS 

gramming in Basic and Fortran languages; applications to the solution of prob- 
lems in the natural sciences. 

Prerequisite: 50:215 or 50:221 or permission of the instructor. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A470X Teaching of Mathematics 

This course covers the selection, organization and presentation of mathe- 
matics in the junior and senior high school. Topics include: organization of class- 
room activities, lesson planning, techniques of motivation, evaluation, use of multi- 
sensory aids, and applications of established principles of learning. These topics 
will emphasize the methods and materials of teaching contemporary programs of 
mathematics. 

Prerequisite: 50:222. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A521 Real Variables I 

Real number system, Lebesque measure and integration, differentiation, 
Fourier series, LP spaces. Metric spaces, Normed vector spaces, Banach spaces 
and Hilbert spaces. 

Prerequisite: 50:425 or equivalent. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A522 Real Variables II 

Continuation of 50:A521 . 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A525 Complex Variables I 

Integration and differentiation in the complex domain, Cauchy's theorem, 
Cauchy's integral formula, Laurent expansion, residues, elements of conformal 
mapping, series and product representations. 

Prerequisite: 50:425 Advanced Calculus or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A535 Linear Algebra I 

This course is a study of vector spaces and linear transformations, includ- 
ing inner product, matrix representations, binary and quadratic forms, eigenvalues 
and eigenvectors, canonical forms, and functions of matrices. 

Prerequisite: 50:335 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A536 Linear Algebra II 

Continuation of 50:A535. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A537 Mathematical Logic 

Topics include: The sentence calculus, guantifaction theory, Godel's com- 
pleteness theorems and decidability. 

Prerequisite: 50:436 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A540 Probability 

Sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, combinatorial analysis, con- 



MATHEMATICS 77 

ditional probability and stochastic independence, Bernoulli trials, random vari- 
ables and probability distributions, expected value and variance: probability 
generating functions. 

Prerequisite: 50:340 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A546 Non-Parametric Statistics 

Selected distribution-free tests and estimation techniques including sign, 
Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Wilcoxson signed rank, Mann-Whitney, Chi-square, rank 
correlation, Kendall's tau, normal scores, Fisher-Yates test and others. 

Prerequisite: 50:443 or 50:444 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A554 Projective Geometry 

The methods of synthetic and analytic projective geometry are compared and 
used to emphasize the fundamental concepts of Euclidean Geometry. Emphasis 
is placed upon the dependence of many common properties and theorems of 
Euclidean geometry and upon the properties of lines, parallelism, perpendicular- 
ity, similarity of figures, and the definition of distance. 

Prerequisite: 50:450 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A568 Applied Mathematics I 

Topics are selected from: Solution of equilibrium and motion problems, in- 
itial and boundary value problems, Laplace and Fourier transform methods, solu- 
tion by eigenvalue expansion. Green's functions, linear operators in infinite di- 
mensional spaces, integral equations and calculus or variations. 

Prerequisite: 50:335, 50:420, 50:425 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A571 Curriculum Construction in Mathematics 

In this course a careful study is made of contemporary program-proposals for 
the mathematics of grades K through 12. Consideration is given to the problem 
of implementation of current recommendations. Examination is made of the 
mathematical concept underlying various programs. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A572 Teaching of General Mathematics 

This course is concerned with mathematics programs for the non-college- 
bound high school student. Reports and recommendations from curriculum studies 
are examined. Among the topics considered are: Basic characteristics and needs 
of non-academic students, preparation and use of resource materials, classroom 
teaching techniques, and methods of motivation. Emphasis is given to the devel- 
opment of suitable curricula for non-academic students. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A573 Mathematics Materials for the Teacher of Mathematics 

This course is concerned with the construction, adaptation, and effective use 
of materials and aids to motivate and improve the teaching of high school mathe- 
matics. Particular attention is given to the overhead projector, films, and models 
and to material for the mathematics laboratory and for club activities. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



78 MATHEMATICS/PHYSICS 

50:A575 Selected Topics in Mathematics 

A selection of topics associated with the secondary and early college years 
of mathematics will be investigated from an advanced point of view. Topics will 
be selected to give the teacher a broader view from such areas as algebra, geom- 
etry, linear programming and game theory, real and complex analysis, probability 
and statistics. 

Prerequisite: 50:222 or equivalent. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

50:A581 Systems Programming 

Assembly languages, macros, subroutines, data structures, vectors and ar- 
rays, tables, hash coding, stocks, lists, data base systems. 

Prerequisite: 50:461. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

50:A583 Theory of Digital Machines 

Switching functions; Boolean algebra; Boolean minimization; sequential ma- 
chines; threshold logic; regular expressions. 

Prerequisite: 50:461. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Department of Physics — Geoscience 

80:A110 Descriptive Astronomy 

This course in descriptive astronomy is designed for the general student. 
Acquisition of a working knowledge and appreciation of the tool of the astrono- 
mer; the nature of the solar system; location of points of the celestial sphere; mo- 
tions and laws relative to systems; the nature, classification and magnitudes of 
stars; and cosmogony, are course objectives. (Formerly 84:120) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

80:A401 Teaching of Science in Secondary Schools 

The purposes are: to review the educational objectives of science in the pub- 
lic schools; to consider a program of science instruction for secondary schools 
including the new programs; to study aids to instruction such as texts, manuals, 
workbooks, tests and enrichment materials; to make a critical review of evaluation 
in science classes; and to observe and participate in junior high school classes at 
work. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

80:A418 Three Centuries of Science Progress 

This course includes a study of fundamental world changes that have re- 
sulted in the past three hundred years from scientific discoveries. Stress is given 
to the nature of scientific inquiry, its cumulative nature, its desire for freedom 
and means of judging the probable fruitfulness of a research problem. The role 
the man of science occupies in the world today is contrasted with his counterpart 
in earlier centuries. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

80:A422 Consumer Science 

Basic scientific principles are developed in the process of testing and evalu- 



PHYSICS 79 

ating consumer products. Field trips are taken to local industries and testing 
agencies to evaluate processes as well as products. A laboratory-testing program 
evaluates products ranging from cigarettes to anti-freeze and involves coopera- 
tion of local industry. This course is a general education elective for non-science 
majors and minors. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

84:A100 Fundamentals of Geoscience 

Basic principles of earth science are presented and analyzed to provide a 
framework for understanding the unique physical characteristics of planet Earth. 
Elements of earth-sun relations, weather, oceanography and landform types are 
studied through a variety of approaches. A field trip is included to examine in 
greater depth selected aspects of the subject. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

84:A101 Principles of Geology 

A study of the geologic materials and processes and the internal structure of 
the earth. The earth and its geographic, stratigraphic, and structural develop- 
ment throughout geologic time; the record of the evolution of life as interpreted 
through a study of rocks and fossils. Required field trips to areas of geologic in- 
terest. 

Not open to geoscience majors or those students who have had physical 
geology. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

84:A406 invertebrate Paleontology 

A study of invertebrate fossils, their classification, morphology, evolution, 
stratigraphic distribution and paleoecology. Field trips to areas of paleontolo- 
gical interest. 

Prerequisite: Historical Geology and General Biology or permission of the 
instructor. 

4 semester hours Fall Semester 

84:A506 Advanced Invertebrate Paleontology 

The study of the Fossil invertebrates with emphasis on their evolutionary, 
paleoecologic, and stratigraphic significance. Laboratory and field work stresses 
collecting, preparation, identification and curatorial techniques. Field trips. 

Prerequisite: Invertebrate paleontology or permission of the instructor. 
4 semester hours Spring Semester 

84:A517 Geophysics 

Theory and application of conventional geophysical methods: seismology, 
magnetism, electricity, and gravity. Laboratory includes the collection and inter- 
pretation of geophysical data. Field trips. 

Prerequisite: Physical Geology and College physics. (3 hours lecture) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



80 BUSINESS STUDIES 

SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Department of Business Studies 

10:A300 Business Mathematics 

This course is concerned with mathematical concepts that help the student 
to become more effective in his daily living and as a teacher of business arith- 
metic, percentage, simple and compound interest, consumer credit and install- 
ment buying, savings and investments, mortgages, pensions, annuities, social 
security, taxation, and insurance. 

Prerequisite: Required courses in math. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A401 Principles and iVIethods of Teaching General Business 

Basis of this course is the methodology of teaching the general business sub- 
jects, including general business, business law, and consumer education. Con- 
tent, lesson planning, visual aids, and evaluation procedures are considered for 
each subject. 

Prerequisite: 12 hours of general business courses. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

10:A402 Principles and Methods of Teaching Accounting 

A brief study is made of the history and development of accounting instruc- 
tion and materials, aims and objectives in the light of current trends. Special at- 
tention is given to textbook selection, lesson planning, classroom procedures, 
tests measurements, audio-visual and other teaching aids. A test of subject mat- 
ter competency is required. 

Prerequisite: 12 semester hours of accounting. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

10:A404X Principles and Methods of Teaching Typewriting 

This course complements 10:204 and deals with the techniques of teaching 
beginning and advanced typewriting with attention given to the psychology of 
skill development. 

Prerequisite: 10:203. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A409 Consumer Economics 

The role of the consumer in the economy is studied with the emphasis on 
forces affecting consumer demand, governmental and private agencies aiding the 
consumer, and development of intelligent techniques for buying and using con- 
sumer goods and services. 

Prerequisite: Required courses in Economics. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A434 Introduction to Business Data Processing 

This course familiarizes the student with the literature and vocabulary of 
business data processing— input and output media, types of equipment, installa- 
tions, job analysis and systems development. 

Prerequisite: 12:201. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



BUSINESS STUDIES 81 

10:A435 Unit Record Equipment 

This course covers the concepts and operational techniques of punch card 
data processing machines, control panel wiring, card punch, accounting machines, 
verifiers and sorters. Four hours, lab plus two lectures. 

Prerequisite: 10:434. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A501 Principles and Problems of Business Education 

Survey of basic principles and practices of business education. Topics in- 
clude history of business education, objectives, relationship of business education 
to general education, trends and problems in the field. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

10:A503 Introduction to Research in Business Education 

Introduces the literature and research of business education to the graduate 
student. Topics covered include: evaluation of current literature in business edu- 
cation and distributive education, nature and types of business education re- 
search, methods and techniques of business education research, and tools used 
for interpreting statistical data. Student develops outline for research study to be 
completed in 10:603, Seminar in Business Education. 

Prerequisite: Ed. 501, or equivalent. (Not to be taken by students who had 
10:502, Evaluation of Current Literature in Business Education.) 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A511 Improvement of Instruction in Bookkeeping, Accounting, and 
Business Arithmetic 

Study of objectives, content, methods, teaching aids, and evaluation pro- 
cedures. 

Prerequisites: Undergraduate methods course in bookkeeping and/or teach- 
ing experience. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

10:A513 Improvement of Instruction in Stenography and Secretarial Practice 

Refinement of teaching and personal skills, introduction to the latest instruc- 
tional equipment and method are emphasized through demonstration, participa- 
tion, and reading. 

Prerequisite: Undergraduates methods in stenography and/or teaching ex- 
perience. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

10:A530 Business Education in Post High School Institutions 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the purposes, curricula, 
Tiethods, and problems of teaching business education subjects in post-high 
school institutions, including technical institutes, two-year, and four-year colleges. 
J semester hours Fall Semester 

0:A603 Seminar in Business Education 

Matriculated graduate student in business completes research project in 
)usiness or distributive education. Course also prepares student for M.A. com- 
irehensive examinations. 

Prerequisite: 10:501, 10:502 and Ed. 503, or 10:503. 
semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



82 DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

Department of Distributive Education 

11:A419 Merchandise Information 

This course covers both textiles and non-textiles. The student will be given 
standards for determining quality of products and a knowledge of how to take care 
of them. Manufacturing processes of various products will be considered. 

Prerequisite: Required courses in math. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

11:A452 Principles of Vocational Education 

This course covers the basic principles and practices of vocational educa- 
tion. Topics include the cooperative federal-state programs of vocational edu- 
cation developed under the Smith-Hughes Act, George-Barden Act, George- 
Deen Act, 1963 Vocational Education Act and the 1968 Amendments. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

11:A454 Principles and Methods of Teaching Distributive Education and 
Coordination 

This course covers the basic principles and methods of teaching distributive 
education. Coverage includes the federal legislation as it relates to the program, 
coordinator's duties, methods in teaching store subjects, use of lecture and dem- 
onstration in teaching, forms, reports and manuals, planning the lesson, human 
relations for store personnel, visual aids, free sources of materials, textbook eval- 
uation, trade journal use, and the DE club as a teaching device. Teaching demon- 
strations are also a part of the program. 

Full-time students are required to participate for 3 semesters in the co-curri- 
cular activities of the DE club prior to their admission to the methods course. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

11:A553 Principles & Problems of Adult Extension Distributive Education 

Organization, promotion, publicity, and methods for adult extension classes. 
Using the community resources for extension classes. Covers in-service, pre-, 
service, and advanced courses for regular and disadvantaged classes for adults.' 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



11:A554 Workshop in Problems of Distributive Education 

Intensive analysis of problem-solving in distributive education programs. Dis- 
cussion on individual problems and experiences in teaching and administering 
distributive education programs. Committee work-seminar method is used. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



Department of Business Administration 



ilai 
si 



hi 



12:A101 Principles of Business Management 

This course is designed as a comprehensive study of basic managemer 
principles. The topics included are planning, objectives, leadership, coordinatior 
management strategy and business decision theory. It incorporates related sub,,, 
jects such as, economics, money and banking, managerial accounting, statistic , / 
and basic occupational research. , } 

3 semester hours Fall Semestell ' 






BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 83 

12:A201 Accounting I— Financial 

This course emphasizes a thorough understanding and mastery of the funda- 
mental elements of accounting. After analyzing the elementary accounting equa- 
tions, the student learns to journalize, post, take a trial balance and prepare 
financial statements, and close the books. Special journals and controlling ac- 
counts are introduced. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

12:A202 Accounting II— Managerial 

This course is a continuation of 12:201. The student continues to use special 
journals, controlling accounts, work sheets, classified statements, reserves, ac- 
cruals, deferred items, reversals, special columns and business papers. Special 
attention is given to accounting systems and controls, particularly corporations, 
posts, analysis and interpretation. 

Prerequisite: 12:201. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

I2:A208 Salesmanship 

This course covers the selection of prospects, sales presentation, overcom- 
ng objections of the customer, closing the sale and "plus" selling. Assigned 
;ales presentations are incorporated in the applications of the selling techniques 
earned. (Part-time work experience is recommended when taking Salesmanship.) 
) semester hours Spring Semester 

2:A301 Accounting III— Intermediate 

In this intermediate course there is emphasis on all phases of partnership 

nd corporate accounting, including: the formation of partnerships and accounts 

' nd records; corporate surplus and dividends; corporate stocks and bonds. De- 

■artmental and branch accounting are presented through exercises and laboratory 

roblems. 

Prerequisite: 12:202. 
. semester hours Fall Semester 

2:A302 Accounting IV— Intermediate 

I This course is a continuation of 12:301. Manufacturing and cost account- 
isMQ procedures are presented with complete analysis for the advanced student 
r.f accounting. Job order and process accounting are studied in detail as well 
3 the problems of budgets and the analysis and interpretation of financial 
Ifiatements. 

I Prerequisite: 12:301. 
semester hours Spring Semester 

?:A310 Personnel Management 

This course is devoted to an analysis of personnel techniques with particu- 
re' r emphasis on the cultural, social, economic, and technical changes in our so- 
'-' ety, and their effect on personnel policies. Designed to include the in-depth 
sJ'udy of manpower requirements and supply, selection procedure, interviewing 
s^'^hd counseling techniques, merit evaluation, transfers, executive development, 

b evaluation and wage classification, 
e^'^ 'semester hours Fall Semester 



84 BUSmESS ADMINISTRATION 

12:A406 Advertising 

This course covers the policies and procedures involved in the planning, 
preparation, and application of advertising in a retail store. Consideration is 
given to the definition of sales promotion, objectives, establishment of policies, 
analysis of sales potentials, evaluation, coordination and follow-up of sales pro- 
motion. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

12:A408 Finance Management 

This course deals with the processes involved in the financing of business 
organizations from the time of their inception and promotion, during operation 
and expansion, and during the period of reorganization. Problems involving 
financing by means of stocks, borrowing capital, mortgage, bonds, and notes; 
are solved. 

Prerequisite: 12:202. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

12:A417 Marketing Management 

This course is devoted to an analysis of modern marketing techniques with 
particular emphasis on consumer buying habits, marketing institutions, marke^ 
research techniques, advertising, pricing, promotion, packaging, and salesman- 
ship. Economics, statistics and management theories relating to marketing are 
incorporated in this comprehensive course. , 

3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



12:A421 Principles of Investments 

This is a general course in investments, trusts, and estates. It concerns it 
self with types of securities, diversification, sources of information, operatioii 
of the stock market, and analysis of financial statements. Also covered are 
trusts, wills, and estate planning. 

Prerequisite: 12:408. j I 

3 semester hours Spring Semeste 

! le 
12:A423 Buying for Distribution 

This course covers the functions of the merchandise division of a store: ihi^^ 
functions of the buyer and the many facets of the buyer, problems in the ston! 
customer demand analysis, comparison shopping, bargain hunting, planning th 
buyer's budget, buying fashions, staples for independent stores, chain store 
resident buying offices, and foreign buying. 

Prerequisite: Required courses in Marketing and Management. ' 

2 semester hours Fall Semest 



12:A457 Sales Management 

The place of the sales manager in modern retail marketing is covered 
well as sales organization, sales operations, sales planning, and sales analys 
Also considered are the selection and training of salesmen, ethical problems 
sales management, and social responsibilities of a sales manager in today's mf 
keting operations. 
3 semester hours Spring Semesi 






r 



HOME ECONOMI CS 85 

Department of Home Economics 

26:A101 The Family— An Interdisciplinary Approach 

Basic insights and concepts from the social sciences are presented in sur- 
veying the history and structure of the family and its place as a basic but chang- 
ing institution in modern America. 

A study of how the Home Economist relates to this institution. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

26:407 Consumer Action 

The study of motivations influencing individual and family consumption pat- 
terns, problems encountered in the consumer role, and investigations of policies 
and procedures which affect consumer choice. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

26:420 Teaching Family Living in the Public Schools 

Study and selection of subject matter and strategies for teaching family liv- 
ing are developed as an integral part of the home economics curriculum. 

Prerequisite: 26:209 Family Relations and 26:401 The Teaching of Home 
'Economics or equivalents. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

26:A430 Creative Experiences in Early Childhood 

Designed to give students direct experience in the areas of art, music and 
science for the preschooler. 

Prerequisite or to be taken concurrently: 26:A435. 
] semester hours Spring Semester 

' 'Certification only; not applicable to the Home Economics, Master of Arts Pro- 
^ jram. 

16:432 Women in Contemporary Society 

ti A study of the historical developments and social forces which have shaped 
he status of women as it exists in America today. Outstanding current concerns 
ire discussed and stress is placed on the variety of role options available to to- 

t^ lay's women. 

)ff 1 semester hours Fall Semester 

6:A435 Program Planning in Early Childhood Education 

Students learn the principles of curriculum development for planning pro- 
irams for pre-school children. 
.1 Prerequisite: 26:207 Child Development I or equivalent, 
semester hours Fall Semester 

Certification only; not applicable to the Home Economics, M.A. Program. 

6:A510 Interdisciplinary Study of the Family 

^j! To familiarize students with contributions which various academic disciplines 
^,;iistory, anthropology, biology, economics, as well as psychology and sociology) 

lake towards a more comprehensive understanding of family life. 
^jl|semester hours Fall Semester 



86 HOME ECONOMICS/ INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

26:A511 Contemporary Issues in Home Economics 

A seminar dealing witin timely issues in home economics with special emphasis 
on changes in society which affect the family. Attention is centered on problems 
of continuing concern. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

26:A520 Dynamics of Family Interaction 

A critical review of concepts and theories, both psychological and sociolog- 
ical, which are currently used in understanding patterns and problems of family 
relationships. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

26:A530 Management of Family Resources 

A study of the family as a decision-making unit directing its resources for 
more effective living. Philosophical, psychological, sociological and economic 
trends which have a direct influence on the family's ability to maximize its re- 
source potential and utilization are included. 

3 semester hours Fall Semestei 

26:A531 Housing the Family 

A study of the principles of family housing; analysis of location, structure 
design, furnishings, and equipment as a setting for the physical and emotional de- 
velopment of the individual and the family. 
2 semester hours Spring Semeste 

26:A550 New Findings in Nutrition 

Recent developments in nutrition and a critical review of fundamentals. 
Prerequisite: Nutrition 306 or equivalent. 

2 semester hours Spring Semeste 

26:A603 Research Seminar 

Library or experimental research on specific problems of limited scope 
Work may be taken in the following areas: (a) child and family; (b) family and cor 
sumption economics; (c) family housing; (d) foods; (e) nutrition; and (f) textile 
and clothing. 

Prerequisite: 15:503. 

3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



Department of Industrial Education & Technology 

28:A110 Foundations of Design 

Methods of designing with materials are introduced. Creativity, brainstem 
ing, problem solving and analysis are methods which are considered and applie 
in the solution of fundamental problems of designing with materials. 
3 semester hours Fall Semest 



28:A120 Graphic Communication 

All aspects of graphic communication are surveyed with particular emphas 
on its role in the industrial and business world. Students study the various co 
cepts of graphic representation and explore the impact of automation in this are 
3 semester hours Fall Semest 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 87 

28:A130 Foundations of Industry— Graphic Arts Communication 

Graphic Arts Communication provides an opportunity to explore the funda- 
mental operations of the major printing processes. Topics concerning the use of 
type, composition, proofing, imposition, and platen presswork are covered. 
Screen process is explored through the use of hand cut stencil operations. The 
lithographic method permits exploration of the basic fundamentals of offset print- 
ing. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A140 Foundations of Industry-Wood 

An overview of the wood product industries with emphasis on the study of the 
lumber industry, standard hand tool and common machine operations, as well as 
basic finishing processes. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A250 Foundations of Industry-Plastics 

A fundamental study of the plastics industry and machine operations in the 
manipulation of a variety of plastic materials. Emphasis is given to fundamental 
principles and concepts, machine processing, as well as material selection, equip- 
ment use and safety. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A260 Foundations of Industry-Metals 

An introductory study of concepts and processes involving metallic materials 
supplemented by related laboratory experiences. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A270 Electricity Fundamentals 

The student is provided the opportunity to explore the basic concepts of 
'electricity and how these concepts are applied to the world around us. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A280 Foundations of Industry— Power 

An introduction to power sources with emphasis placed upon the study of 
reciprocating internal combustion engines. The course will provide an overview of 
the design, development, function and operation of common power sources. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A331 Letterpress Reproduction 

The fundamentals of letterpress printing are studied in relation to the graphic 
arts industry. Topics covered are the historical development of printing, layout, 
|type styles, type cases, spacing, hand composition, proofing methods, lockup and 
I mposition. manual and automatic platen press operation. 

I Prerequisite: 28:130 Foundations of Industry— Graphic Arts Communication 
:pr permission of instructor. 
3l^B semester hours Spring Semester 

.|48:A333 Black and White Photography 

An indepth study dealing with the photographic processes concerned with 
Continuous tone photography. Topics covered are darkroom construction, chem- 
r^Kals for processing, equipment for processing, film exposure techniques, con- 
crtact printing, enlarging, drying, and mounting photographs. 
r:= Prerequisite: 28:130 or permission of instructor. 
.esir' semester hours Fall Semester 



88 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

28:A341 Machine Woodwork 

The in-depth study of the shaping of wood by use of portable electric and 
machine woodworking operations. Included are all phases of machine operation, 
maintenance, jig and fixture design. 

Prerequisite: 28:140. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A353 Plastics Molding and Forming III 

An intermediate laboratory course concerned with the maintenance pro- 
cesses of bonding, lamination, encapsulation, foaming, coating, expanding and 
reinforcing. Stress is placed on procedural application, cycle development and 
adjustment where applicable, equipment variation in style function and operation, 
mold use and understanding, as well as maintenance and safety. 

Prerequisite: 28:250 or permission of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A361 Machine Metal Technology 

The study of contemporary machine metalwork involving layout, machining 
and precision control. Laboratory activities will afford an opportunity to develop 
an understanding of machine practices in the metals industry. 

Prerequisite: 28:260 or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A371 Electronic Fundamentals 

Dynamic circuit conditions in the analysis of their electronic concepts 
through theoretical and experimental means are studied. 

Prerequisite: 28:270 or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A381 Industrial Power 

An advanced study of power consisting of experiences dealing with existing 
and experimental power sources. Power sources studied include diesel, rocket, 
turbine and rotary combustion engines along with the examination of external com 
bustion converters. 

Prerequisite: 28:280 or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A404 A,B>C Independent Studies in Industry 

Independent Studies in Industry is designed to encourage students to pursue 
individual study problems under the guidance of a sponsoring faculty member 
The study to be performed will be based on a problem jointly agreed upon by the 
student and the faculty sponsor. 

Prerequisite: Application through the department office prior to registration 
1-3 semester hours each Fall and Spring Semesterr 

28:A411 Design in Industry 

The industrial designer's approach to design dictates the course activities 
Students design products which are adaptable to mass production technique' 
in the contemporary market. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



\ 



INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 89 

28:A490 Jewelry Making and Lapidary 

Laboratory experience includes the design of pieces that will involve cast- 
ing and wrought jewelry processes. Lapidary experiences cultivate skills in saw- 
ing, shaping, polishing and mounting stones to exhibit their inherent qualities. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

28:A491 Construction Technology 

An integrated two-part related program. The course is designed to provide an 
introduction to the construction segment of industrial technology as conceived 
and developed by the Industrial Arts Curriculum Project (lACP). The course 
will provide the industrial arts teacher with sufficient technical knowledge and 
skills to be professionally ready to teach the innovative secondary school curricu- 
lum. "The World of Construction." Fifty percent of the course will be devoted to 
trial teaching-learning experiences. 

Registration by invitation or permission of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A492 Manufacturing Technology 

An integrated two-part related program. The course is designed to provide 
an introduction to the manufacturing segment of industrial technology as con- 
ceived and developed by the Industrial Arts Curriculum Project (lACP). The 
course will provide the industrial arts teacher with sufficient technical knowledge 
and skills to be professionally ready to teach the innovative secondary school 
curriculum, "The World of Manufacturing." Fifty percent of the course will be de- 
voted to trial teaching-learning experiences. 

Registration by invitation or permission of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

' 28:A501 Curriculum Construction and Course Organization in Industrial 
Education 

Curriculum construction techniques used in developing a program of indus- 
trial arts are studied. Special emhasis is placed on the development of industrial 
arts courses and instructional materials. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A502 Shop Planning and Equipment Selection in Industrial Education 

Principles of planning and equipment selection for modern industrial arts 
laboratories are stressed. The practical application includes architectural as- 
pects, floor plan layouts, equipment selection, bid preparation, and construction 
of scaled laboratory models. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

28:A507 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational-Technical Education 

The coordinators of cooperative industrial education programs are provided 
with the opportunity to study the principles and philosophy of vocational-techni- 
cal education. The course content presents a brief history of the cultural, so- 
cial, governmental, economic and technical forces which affect the development 
I of vocational-technical education. The organization and function of the state 
divisions of vocational education are presented. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 



90 INDUSTRIAL E D U C A T I O N / V O C A T I O N A L EDUCATION 

28:A509 Curriculum Construction in Vocational-Technical Education 

A survey of vocational curriculum construction techniques designed to meet 
the needs of related and laboratory teaching and school-work programs. Em- 
phasis will be placed on curriculum materials especially adapted to the needs 
of part-time cooperative trade occupational programs. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

28:A601 A, B. C Independent Study in Industrial Arts 

This course is designed to allow students to pursue study on individual prob- 
lems under the guidance of a sponsoring faculty member. In addition, credit 
may be obtained for I. A. 601 upon completion of an approved industrial course 
related to the student's special area of interest. 

Prerequisite: Application through Department office prior to registration. 
1-3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

28:A603 Research Seminar in Industrial Arts 

Two patterns of research are considered in this seminar: (1) Industrial re- 
search techniques with materials and processes as they may be adapted to in- 
dustrial arts programs in public school; (2) Education research techniques as 
they are applied to problems in industrial arts education. (This course meets all 
year). 

Prerequisite: 15:503. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



Vocational Education 

29:A414 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational-Technical Education 

The teachers of vocational-technical education are provided the opportun- 
ity to study the philosophy, principles and practices of vocational-technical edu- 
cation. A brief history of the cultural, social, economic, technical and govern- 
mental forces which affected the development of vocational-technical education 
are studied. The organization and function of the federal and state divisions of 
vocational education are presented. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

29:A421 Curriculum Construction in Vocational-Technical Education 

A review of federal, state, county and community curriculums in the various 
Vocational-Technical Education areas. Principles of curriculum construction will 
be discussed in relation to the surveyed curriculums. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

29:A471 Vocational-Technical In-Service Supervised Teaching Seminar 

This is a two part course which cover an academic year. The first part of the 
course, occurring in the first semester of enrollment, involves the student in a bi- 
weekly seminar and on-the-job supervision by the seminar instructor. The second 
part of the course, occurring in the succeeding semester of enrollment provides 
for on-the-job supervision and individual conferences. (This course meets all 
year). 

8 semester hours Fall Semester 

I 
1 






HEALTH EDUCATION 91 

PANZER SCHOOL DIVISION 
Health Education 

73:A408 Driver Education 

A basic course for the certification of Driver Education teachers. The course 
consists of a minimum of 40 hours of class recitation and/or discussion and 20 
hours of practical experience. 

Prerequisite: Driver's license and three years of satisfactory driving experi- 
ence. 

NOTE: Students must be recommended by their high school principal and have 
an interview with the instructor before registration. This course should not be 
selected as a health education elective. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

73:A413 The Drug Abuse Problem 

This course is designed for the senior-graduate student who desires oppor- 
tunity for the development of a broad-scope, comprehensive understanding of the 
drug scene. Special attention is directed towards the physical, psychological, 
societal, legal and educational aspects of drug use and misuse. Rehabilitative 
and preventive measures are carefully presented against a background of con- 
stantly changing developments. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

73:A414 Workshop in Venereal Disease Education 

This workshop course is designed primarily for the in-service teacher and 
upper class undergraduate students. A study of epidemiology, Federal, State, 
and local control programs, pathology, treatment, and legal aspects of venereal 
disease will be undertaken. Particular emphasis will be placed on teenage inci- 
dence of venereal disease, and educational implementation will be a primary 
consideration. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

73:A501 School Safety 

This course will deal with all aspects of safety relating to the well being of 
school personnel. Incidence of accidents and their cause, safety hazards, dis- 
aster control, and development of a school safety program will be considered. 

3 semester hours Spring Semester 

73:A502 Safety: Man and His Environment 

This course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the major areas 
of safety, particularly as they relate to man and his environment. Pertinent safety 
information is presented through several carefully selected sources, with special 
attention given to the problems of air and water pollution, automotive safety, in- 
dustrial safety and other safety areas considered part of this broad field of study. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

73:A508 Advanced Driver Safety 

This course continues the development of new and broader competencies in 
traffic safety, and the teaching of Driver Education, evaluation, and research. 



92 HEALTH EDUCATION 

Prerequisite: (1) 73:408; (2) At least two years Behind-the-Wheel Instruction 
experience; (3) Recommendation from Employer in writing. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

73:A516 Community and Environmental Aspects of Health 

This course deals essentially with environmental health problems of the com- 
munity. It provides a comprehensive survey of major health problems that affect 
the local as well as the state, federal and international scene. Air and water 
pollution, malnutrition, communicable disease, mental health, maternal and infant 
care, safety, drug abuse, environmental sanitation, waste disposal, food protec- 
tion, and various other topics are presented against a background of rapidly 
changing political, social, and economic conditions. Special attention is directed 
toward the structure, function, and operation of various community organizations, 
official and voluntary, which deal with these problems. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

73:A525 History and Foundations of Health 

This offering provides for study, interpretation, and analysis of the historical 
background and current perspectives in health and health education. The history 
of the health movement is traced from its earliest beginnings to present times and 
includes an interpretation of the development of health education in the schools, 
particularly in relation to scientific advancements and prevailing educational 
philosophy. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

73:A526 Curriculum Development in Health Education 

The basic purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for the develop- 
ment of understandings and insights into the nature and construction of the com- 
prehensive health education curriculum. All aspects of curriculum development 
are included and are presented through various carefully selected means. A 
review and interpretation of appropriate teaching methods, materials, and evalua- 
tion procedures are also considered. 

Prerequisite: A basic course in health education; a basic course in teaching 
methodology in health education. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

73:A528 Evaluation in Health 

This course deals essentially with the instruments and procedures necessary 
in determining the effectiveness of various aspects of the total school health 
program. Special attention is directed towards the development and implementa- 
tion of evaluation devices, with additional consideration given to the interpretive 
and administrative factors related to the evaluation process. 

Prerequisite: a basic course in tests and measurement or a basic course in 
statistics. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

73:A529 Seminar in Basic Issues in Health 

This course offers the graduate student in health various opportunities to 
pursue carefully selected topics of personal interest. Problem areas are identi- 
fied, interpreted, and critically analyzed with a view towards the development of 
deeper insights and understandings. The areas of study are planned and devel- 
oped through individual and group consultation. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



HEALTH EDUCATION/PHYSICAL EDUCATION 93 

73:A603 Research Seminar in Health Education 

This course is designed to provide opportunities for the development of an 
original research project in health education. Each student is required to conduct 
an investigation in a carefully selected area of study and complete a written re- 
search project which must be presented to the Panzer School faculty for ap- 
proval. This course is conducted for two semesters with specially scheduled class 
sessions and individual conferences. (This course meets the entire year.) 

Prerequisite: 73:528, Evaluation in Health, and 15:503, Methods of Research. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



Physical Education 

76:A552 Seminar in Current Problems in Men's Athletics 

The organization and administration of intramural and interscholastic ath- 
letic programs will be considered in this course. Current practices related to 
crowd control, scheduling, promotion of the program, personnel, and other per- 
sistent problems identified by the students will be discussed. Trends in such 
areas as sports medicine, coaching, and officiating will also be considered. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

76:A553 Seminar in Current Problems in Women's Athletics 

Cultural, educational, economic and physical aspects in the selection of ap- 
propriate activities will be considered. Objectives in relation to desired outcomes 
will be established on the basis of group needs. Types of program organization 
and planning will be discussed, motivation, publicity and awards will be con- 
sidered, programs in operation will be examined, and literature and research 
projects will be reviewed. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

76:A554 Orientation in Sports Medicine 

New techniques, materials, modalities, and problems related to the preven- 
tion and care of athletic injuries will be covered. Appropriate current develop- 
ments in the field of sports medicine will be discussed and studied along with 
new concepts and activities for conditioning for both the athlete and non-athlete. 

Prerequisite: Courses in the prevention and care of athletic injuries, kinesi- 
logy, and physiology of exercise. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

76:A556 The Psychology of Physical Activity 

Scientific principle and research from the field of psychology are studied and 
related to the world of physical activity. Educational program situations amenable 
to research and the application of psychological principles are isolated. Major 
emphasis is placed on continuing research in the field of physical education. 
Psychological evidence is utilized to recomend improvements in physical educa- 
tion methodology. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

76:A575 Philosophical and Sociological Foundations of Physical Education 

A brief review of the history of physical education with emphasis on the de- 
velopment of physical education in the United States is undertaken, examining the 



94 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

factors which had the greatest influence. A study of current sociological and 
philosophic factors that affect modern physical education practices and methods 
are also examined, as well as the scientific foundation upon which physical educa- 
tion is based. 

Prerequisite: A course covering the history and principles of p.e. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

76:A576 Curriculum Development in Physical Education 

A study of the selection of appropriate physical education activities for ele- 
mentary and high school programs based on principles of growth and develop- 
ment and psychological and sociological needs. Current trends and practices 
will be investigated and evaluated. Opportunities will be made available for 
working in the student's particular area of interest, and to identify the relationship 
of physical education programs at all levels, and of physical education to other 
areas of instruction in the school curriculum. 

Prerequisite: Methods course in elementary and secondary physical educa- 
tion. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

76:A578 Physical Education for Exceptional Children 

An advanced course in the adaptation of physical education for the excep- 
tional child. The aims, objectives, principles and underlying philosophy will be 
reviewed. The administration, organization and development of such programs 
in the schools will be discussed at length. Current trends will also be evaluated. 

Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in adapted or corrective physical 
education. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

76:A579 Advanced Tests and Measurements in Physical Education. 

A survey will be made of the development of new tests and techniques for 
determining levels of skill, status in growth and development, and for the various 
qualities which contribute to total physical fitness. Advanced techniques for pro- 
cessing data also will be considered. 

Prerequisite: A course in educational statistics. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

76:A603 Research Seminar in Physical Education 

The purpose of this course is to examine the principles upon which research 
is based in physical education and to familiarize students with important studies, 
programs, personnel and techniques employed in research in this area. Each 
student will be required to complete a research project which must be presented 
to the physical education faculty for approval. The course runs for two semesters 
with specially scheduled class sessions and individual conferences. 

Prerequisite: 15:503. (This course meets the entire year) 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



ANTHROPOLOGY 95 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVORIAL SCIENCES 
Department of Anthropology 

91:A200 Cultural Anthropology 

A general introduction to cultural anthropology emphasizing its basic meth- 
odologies, concepts, applications, and goals. The nature of culture, the role of 
culture in human experience, and the university of human needs and aspirations 
are demonstrated through the analysis of transcultural data. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

91:A201 Physical Anthropology 

This course deals with the broad spectrum of physical anthropology. The 
biological basis of human evolution, including a survey of such topics as human 
paleontology, primatology, the races of man and the relationship of culture to 
man's development are covered through classroom lectures and the use of audio- 
visual materials. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

91:A531 Human Variation 

This course will approach the study of various races from the perspective of 
physical anthropology. Theories and explanations of human variations, racial 
types in the modern world, as well as misconceptions concerning race and intel- 
ligence and race and culture will be explored. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

91:A533 Spanish Culture in the U.S. Today 

This course deals with the cultural heritage of Spanish-speaking America. 
Utilizing anthropological concepts, problems of adjustment and educational 
implications are emphasized. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

91:A536 Ethnology II 

The study of primitive and folk cultures as seen in contemporary perspective. 
The purpose of this course is to increase student awareness of the range and 
variety of cultures in today's world, and to improve understandings of factors 
which account for cultural variability. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

91:A538 Ethnopsychology 

(Also listed as 65:538) 

An interdisciplinary team-taught graduate course in psychological anthro- 
pology. This course focuses on convergencies of theoretical and methodological 
concepts from anthropology and psychology. Units of study are devoted to: 
personality in culture; perception, cognition, and learning in transcultural per- 
spective; cultural continuity, discontinuity, and change; cultural psychiatry; and 
creativity and culture. Illustrative data from interdisciplinary studies are utilized 
throughout. (Formerly Psychological Anthropology) 

Prerequisite: Previous course work in anthropology and psychology or by 
permission of the instructors. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



96 ECONOMICS 

Department of Economics 

92:A102 Principles of Economics: Micro. 

Organization and operation of the American economy for the production and 
distribution of goals and services. Pricing of products and factors of production 
in market situations varying from competition to monopoly. Resource allocation, 
price determination and behavior of the firm in the determination of quantity of 
output and the hiring of factors of production. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

92:A203 Economic Statistics 

The purpose of this course is to make the student a critical user of statistics. 
Topics covered include frequency distribution, sampling, index numbers, eco- 
nomic time series, statistical inference and correlation techniques. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

92:A541 Foundations of Contemporary Economic Thought 

The objectives of this course are: (1) to study the antecedents of current 
economic theory; (2) to analyze economics as a cumulative science through ex- 
amination of the works of the creative economists; (3) to foster an understanding 
of the uses and limitations of economic theory. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

92:A544 Government and Business 

The objectives of this course are: (1) to study the evolution of governmental 
influences on the functioning of the American economy; (2) to analyze the causes 
and consequences of government regulation and control; (3) to foster an under- 
standing of the relationship between economic analysis and public policies. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



WORKSHOP & SEIVIINAR IN ECONOMIC EDUCATION 

92:E406 3 semester hours 

Available at Bergen County Technical &, Vocational High School and other 
locations throughout the State each fall and spring. 

Purpose of the workshop is: 

1. to increase teacher's level of understanding of workings of the 
American economy. 

2. acquaint participants with best available written and audio- 
visual materials in economic education. 

3. demonstrate examples of effective economic education. 

4. assist teachers in preparing units or courses of study for use in 
their own schools. 

In the past, tuition scholarships have been available to qualified applicants. 
Further information and applications are available through the Center for 
Economic Education, Montclair State College— 893-5224. 



GEOGRAPHY 97 

Department of Geography 

93:A100 Principles of Geography 

Familiarizes students with the spatial distribution and significance of im- 
portant geographic phenomena, such as atmospheric pressure and wind systems, 
climatic types, water bodies, landforms, soil types, natural resources and popula- 
tion distribution. Mapping techniques and map interpretation will also constitute 
part of the course. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

93:A200 Cultural Geography 

This course examines the traits that give groups their distinctive character 
and that condition the manner in which each group perceives and uses its habitat. 
Emphasis is placed on the socio-cultural diversity of mankind and on the spatial 
aspects of race, language, religion and nations as categories of thought patterns 
and institutions that unite or separate human groups. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

93:A305 Geography of East and Southeast Asia 

This course is designed as regional analyses of East Asia (China, Japan) 
and Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Indonesia). It examines the physical and cultural 
aspects of the geography of the area and the roles of East and Southeast Asia 
in world politics and economic affairs. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

93:A410 Urban Geography 

This course is a study of the growth, morphology, and function of cities. At- 
tention will be given to the complex, dynamic forces which influence spatial pat- 
terns and functional changes within urban areas. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

93:A413 The Middle East 

A regional analysis of the Middle East, the course examines critically the 
physical, cultural and demographic aspects of the area's geography. Geographic 
relations within the region as well as relations with the rest of the world are 
studied. Particular attention is given to the petroleum industry and problems of 
agriculture in an arid realm. 

Open to graduate students only. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

93:A421 Population Problems of the World 

An intensive examination of the factors which influence the present-day dis- 
tributional patterns of the world's peoples and the political, economic and social 
consequences of these developments are considered. Particular attention is 
Diaced on man-land relationships as they relate to population problems of con- 
temporary nations. 

Open to graduate students only. 

Prerequisite: 93:200. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

)3:A502 Advanced Economic Geography 

This research type course examines the spatial pattern of economic ele- 
nents. The course is topical and stresses current methodology research. Se- 
ected topics will vary from year to year. 
J semester hours Fall Semester 



98 HFSTORY 

Department of History 

90:A401 The Teaching of the Social Studies in Secondary Schools 

The course presents recent tendencies in educational method in teaching 
the social studies. A program is presented containing the correlation of subject- 
matter organization in socialized recitation, the teaching of current events, pro- 
jects in citizenship, and the use of the project-problem as a method of teaching 
history and civics. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

90:A410 The Newspaper in the Classroom 

This course presents new and standard techniques in the use of the news- 
paper in the English and Social Studies classes in the secondary school. 

By invitation only. Passaic Herald News— sponsor. 
2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

90:A603 Reading Seminar in History and the Social Sciences 

This seminar course is designed primarily to provide an opportunity for grad- 
uate students in the social sciences to investigate and apply the techniques of 
research in the social studies field. 

2 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

94:A100 The Study of American History 

The Study of American History is required of all history majors. It is designed i 
to introduce beginning students to the nature and methods of history and to Amer- ' 
ican history as a special field of study. Majors also elect either 94:101 or 94:102 
which concentrate on special problems and approaches in the fields of European - 
and Non-Western History respectively. The main emphasis in these courses will j 
be on student experience in working with actual historical problems and pro- 1 
cedures. , 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

94:A102 The Study of Non-Western History ' 

Study of American History is required of all history majors, and it is designed, 
to introduce beginning students to the nature and methods of history in general] 
and to American history as a special field of study. Majors must also elect either i 
94:101 or 94:102 which concentrate on special problems and approaches in the 
fields of European and Non-Western history respectively. The main emphasis in 
these courses will be on student experience in working with actual historical prob- 
lems and procedures. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

94:A103 The Development of Early Western Civilization 

A survey of the Western civilizations from earliest times with particular refer- 
ence to the growth, development and interactions of cultural, political, economic, 
social and religious institutions. Emphasis is placed on the significance of domi-' 
nant and distinguishable characteristics through which civilizations may be recog-, 
nized as distinct cultural and social entities. 
3 semester hours Fall Semestei 



94: Alio The Development of American Civilization , 

This course offers the student the opportunity to identify and examine the! 
mainstreams of development in American civilization. Attention is directed to the 



HISTORY 99 

political, intellectual, social, economic and cultural forces and achievements in 
our past which have made the United States distinctive. Major emphasis is placed 
upon the values which have underlaid the establishment and growth of American 
institutions and upon the character of those institutions formal and informal. The 
roles of outstanding individuals are constantly emphasized. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

94:A111 Selected Topics in American History to 1876 

In place of the general survey, this course examines the development of the 
American Nation from the period of discovery and exploration to the Civil War 
and Reconstruction through a study of specific issues and problems. The main 
streams of early American thought, the development of an American society, the 
establishment of our constitutional authority and the contributions and challenges 
of the various sections are analyzed and interpreted. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

94:A112 Selected Topics in American History since 1876 

Continues the approach of the earlier course. Examines the development of 
the American Nation since the Civil War. Special attention is given to the growth 
of American thought, the transition from an agrarian to an industrial society and 
the role of the United States as a world power. National responses to our eco- 
nomic, social and political development are considered. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

34:A121 Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815 

A study of the history of Europe from the end of the Middle Ages to the Con- 
gress of Vienna: The Renaissance and Reformation; the rise of new monarchies; 
Tudor and Stuart England; the Scientific Revolution; the Enlightenment; the 
-ranch Revolution and Napoleon. 
J semester hours Spring Semester 

)4:A122 Nineteenth Century Europe, 1815-1914 

A study of the history of Europe since the Congress of Vienna; the rise of 
nationalism, liberalism, socialism and democracy; the Industrial Revolution; uni- 
ication of Italy and Germany; imperialism and factors leading to World War I. 
,{ semester hours Fall Semester 



[^ I4:A123 Contemporary Europe, 1914 to the Present 

This course surveys the history of Europe from World War I to the present. 

^ajor topics include the Paris Peace Conference, 1919; Revolution of 1917 and 
'^ levelopment of Communism in Russia; failure of the western democracies and 

ise of Fascism in Germany, Italy and Spain; origins of World War II; post-1945 
^j ettlement and establishment of Communism in eastern Europe; and movement 
'■ pwards economic and political integration of western European states. 
^^, semester hours Spring Semester 

° 4:A132 Development of Chinese Civilization 

This course offers a study of the early history of China, 2000 B.C. to 1300 A.D. 
he principal social, political and metaphysical philosophic works of this period 
re considered with special attention to their relationship to corresponding values 

I nd institutions. Art as an expression of Chinese civilization is also examined. 

jli isemester hours Fall Semester 



100 HISTORY 

94:A214 Diplomatic History of the United States 

The purpose of this course is to show how we have become gradually con- 
scious of our world interests and responsibilities, and the important role we have! 
come to play in international politics. The growing concept of world democracy, 
as opposed to commercial and military imperialism, is stressed. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

94:A323 History of Russia to 1917 

Factors which shaped the Russian people, such as Byzantinism and the Greek 
Orthodox faith, the Synod, Tartar state organization, the Mir, Westernization from 
Peter to Lenin, Slavophilism and dialectic materialism, are emphasized. An ac- 
count is presented of Soviet internal organization. In addition to the historica 
background, Russia's great writers are discussed in the light of social and politica 
developments. 
3 semester hours Fall Semestei^ 

94:A423 History of Russia since 1917 

An analysis of political, economic, social and intellectual developments ir 
the Soviet Union; the relationship between ideology and national goals. ! 

Prerequisite: For undergraduate credit only. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 



94:A430 Modern Japanese History 

This course deals with Japanese history from 1854 to the present. Some a1 
tention is given to feudalism in the Tokugawa period and the factors which facili 
tated rapid modernization in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 

94:A512 The American Revolution, 1763-1787 

An intensive study of the causes and course of the American Revolution fror 
both the American and British viewpoints, including analysis of economic, politica 
social and intellectual factors. 
3 semester hours Fall Semeste' 

94:A513 Problems of the New Nation, 1789-1828 

Primary attention is placed on the growth of political institutions under th. 
Constitution, the gaining of respect as a new country in the family of nations, th 
establishment of economic credit, and the rise of American nationalism. 
3 semester hours Spring Semest<| 

94:A517 Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt 

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to study that part 
recent American history which centers about the life of Franklin Delano Rooseve 
The events of 1933-45 represent a culmination of a whole generation's ideas, a 
pirations and experiences. While concentrating on the domestic aspects of Ame' 
ican life, some attention is given to foreign affairs and their impact on the dai 
lives of Americans. ' 

Prerequisite: Open only to history candidates or students with social studir 
certification, or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semest 



HISTORY/POLITICAL SCIENCE 101 

94:A519 The United States in the Nuclear Age 

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to study that part of 
recent American history which centers about the role played by the United States 
in world affairs in the period from 1939 to the present. America's leadership role 
resulted from a decade of peripheral involvement while professing isolation. The 
course concentrates on the international aspects of American life, but the impact 
of domestic affairs on our foreign policy throughout the period is not neglected. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

94:A525 History of Soviet Institutions 

Particular attention is devoted to the institutional apparatus of the Soviet 
system with emphasis given to the special functions performed by such agencies 
as the press, the schools, and the agricultural collective. The role of the Com- 
munist Party and its relation to other political and economic forces within the na- 
tion are discussed. In appraising the development of Soviet foreign policy, the 
emergence of Soviet interests in the Far East, Middle East, and Africa are con- 
sidered. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

94:A530 Nationalism in Modern India 

A cultural and political history of India from 1800 to the present, with focus on 
the contributions of Hindu nationalism and British liberalism to the Indian inde- 
pendence movement and the post-1947 democratic experiment. 
1 3 semester hours Fall Semester 

,.94:A537 19th Century European Intellectual History 

An examination of romantic, utilitarian, conservative, liberal and early exist- 
ential streams of thought in 19th century Europe. Attention is also given to the 
impact of these intellectual movements on European society. 

Prerequisite: Open only to History candidates or students with Social Studies 
certification, or permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



94:A601 New Interpretations in History 

Designed to help teachers to keep up to date in the special fields of Ameri- 
can, European and Non-Western history, this course examines important trends 
and developments in the study and teaching of history in the light of recent repre- 

"'sentative examples of historical research and interpretation. 

I Prerequisite: Open only to History candidates or students with Social Studies 
certification, or permission of instructor. 

^'3 semester hours Spring Semester 



Department of Political Science 



irtt 

^^(|)5:A200 Introduction to Political Science 

(jail A study of government and politics in the contemporary world with particular 
eference to American institutions. Consideration will be given to the organization 

,^|;,And functions of national and international governments. Conflicting ideologies 

vill be examined, 
jljl semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



102 POLITICAL SCIENCE 

95:A402 Governments and Politics of Africa 

This course will examine attempts to develop new political systems in the 
African continent; problems of race relations, and the evolution of national, re- 
gional and Pan-African integrative machinery are also studied. Models created 
by the indigenous leaders and thinkers will be emphasized. The colonial heritage 
will be drawn upon as it relates to system evolution. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

95:A403 Governments and Politics of the Far East 

This course will consider the evolution of the modern Chinese and Japanese 
political systems as developmental models. Emphasis will be on the evolution of 
authoritarian and democratic patterns in China and Japan respectively. The other 
Far Eastern countries will be treated to the extent that they borrow patterns from 
the major actors. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

95:A404 Governments and Politics of South Asia 

This course is designed to give an understanding of the political processes 
of South Asia. Emphasis is given to government, political parties, pressure groups 
and other allied units that form and shape public policy. Particular attention is 
given to developments in India, Pakistan and Ceylon since World War II. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

95:A408 The Development of Political Thought to Hegel 

This course is designed to survey and analyze a select group of political 
philosophers and their contributions to the basic theories of Western political 
thought from the pre-Socratics to Hegel. Among those discussed will be: Plato, 
Aristotle, Cicero, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Luther, Calvin, Bodin, Hobbes 
Locke, Montesquieu, Hume, Rousseau. 
3 semester hours FallSemestei 



95:A409 Modern Political Thought 

Using the nineteenth century as an introduction to twentieth century politica 
thought, this course is designed to acquaint the student with recent developmentij 
in political philosophy. Beginning with such figures as Hegel, Marx, Green, Mill 
Austin, Burke, Sorel and movements such as Romanticism, Liberalism, Socialism 
Conimuninsm, Fascism, the foundations of modern political thought are estab 
lished. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 

95:A502 Modern Political Analysis f^ 

An exploration of methodologies and orientations that have guided the stud 
and analysis of political phenomena. The utility of methods is examined by refei 
ences to political data relating to specific political systems. The perspective I 
therefore comparative. 

Prerequisite: One undergraduate course in Scope and Methods in Politici 
Science or permission of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semeste jj.. 

95:A551 Constitutional Law 

This seminar course will investigate the manner and matter of the Suprem 
Court's decisions in the area of public law. The first Ten Amendments of th 



inte 
met 
k 



K 



PSYCHOLOGY 103 

United States Constitution will be emphasized, particularly in regard to the 
Court's decisions of recent years. 

Prerequisite: One undergraduate course in Constitutional Law or permission 
of the instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Department of Psychology 

65:A100 General Psychology 

Survey of concepts, research methods and findings in such areas as: growth 
and development, motivated and emotional behavior, learning and thinking, in- 
dividual differences, group processes, social behavior, personality, behavior dis- 
orders. Emphasis is on psychology as a behavioral science and application to 
practical life situations. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

|65:A101 Human Growth and Development 

[ Required for teacher certification. Study of growth, development and be- 

■ havior from pre-natal life through senescence. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A200 Educational Psychology 

Designed primarily for students who intend to enter the teaching profession. 
Topics include: concepts in child and adolescent development; fundamentals of 
learning theory as applied to classroom situations, learning inhibition and aca- 
demic nonachievement, personal-social adjustment, measuring and evaluating 
teaching-learning. 

Prerequisite: 65:100. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

55:A201 Child Psychology 

Extensive study of growth, development and behavior of children. Physical, 
ntellectual, social and emotional development and their interaction. Scientific 
Tiethod exemplified through the literature and intensive study of individual chil- 
dren. 

^l Prerequisite: 65:100. 

h semester hours Fall Semester 

i5:A270 Psychology in Business and Industry 

Application of psychological principles and practices in business and indus- 
ry. Problems of communication, group dynamics, man-machine relations, em- 
)loyee attitudes, accident prevention, industrial: job selection techniques, moti- 
ation, executive leadership. Commonly used selection tests will be evaluated. 

Prerequisite: 65:100. 
■semester hours Fall Semester 



esf5:A510 Research Methods in Psychology 

An introduction to research and its application to practical problems. 
Prerequisite: One course in Psychology. 
jfisemester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



i 



mmm 



104 PSYCHOLOGY 

65:A520 Proseminar i 

Learning and motivation (first half term); personality and abnormal psychol- 
ogy (second half term). 

Prerequisite: Matriculated M.A. candidates in a Psychology program only. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A521 Proseminar II 

Sensation and perception (first half term); social psychology (second half 
term). 

Prerequisite: 65:520. Matriculated M.A. candidates in a Psychology pro- 
gram only. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A538 Ethnopsychology 

(Also listed at 91 :A538) 

An interdisciplinary team-taught graduate course in psychological anthro- 
pology. This course focuses on convergencies of theoretical and methodological 
concepts from anthropology and psychology. Units of study are devoted to: 
personality in culture; perception, cognition, and learning in transcultural per- 
spective; cultural continuity, discontinuity, and change; cultural psychiatry; and 
creativity and culture. Illustrative data from interdisciplinary studies are utilized 
throughout. (Formerly Psychological Anthropology) 

Prerequisite: Previous course work in anthropology and psychology, or by 
permission of the instructors. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A540 Remediation of Basic Skills 

Theory and techniques in helping children who are having difficulty in basic 
skills. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A541 Curriculum Development & Methods of Teaching Inner City 
Children 

Problems in teaching in the inner city schools and the special needs of the 
inner city child will be considered. Innovations in teaching methods related tc 
current research findings will be considered. Practicum experiences will be co- 
ordinated with course materials. 

Prerequisite: 65:553 &, 65:565. 
3 semester hours Fall Semeste 

65:A545 Seminar: Emotional Distrubances of Childhood 

Survey of research findings in the field of child psychopathology, with par 
ticular relationship to the problem of education. Material from the practicun 
will be used. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semeste 

65:A549 Psychology of the Adult Learner 

This course considers methods and materials of learning which can bj 
adapted to the educational needs of adults. Particular emphasis will be place 
on topics: identifying educational needs, understanding problems of the adu, 
learner, overcoming learning difficulties, motivation and other factors affectin 



PSYCHOLOGY 105 

effective learning and counseling procedures. The course is individually pro- 
grammed commensurate with the student's background and professional goals. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A550 Quantitative and Statistical Methods 

Principles and techniques of data analysis in psychology. Training of psy- 
chological phenomenon, estimation of parameters, and hypothesis testing. 

Prerequisite: 1 course in statistics. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A552 General Social Psychology 

Theory, methodology, and research findings. Topics include: biological basis 
of social behavior, socialization, attitudes development and change, value sys- 
tems, group processes and conflict. 

Prerequisite: One course in psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A553 Urban Psychology 

Primary focus and psychological development of the disadvantaged. Bio- 
genetic prospectives, intellectual and language development, motivation and 
scholastic achievement, personality and the self-concept, environmental inter- 
vention. 

Prerequisite: One course in psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A554 The Psychology of Business and Industry 

Application of psychological findings to problems encountered in business, 
industry and the professions. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A555 Psychological Aspects of Poverty 

The social and psychological aspects of poverty will be studied from a devel- 
opmental aspect. The child rearing practices, sub-group culture, mores, social 
psychology, and self-perpetuation of certain aspects of such a culture will be 
evaluated in terms of the needs, growth patterns, and problems of persons in- 
volved in such an environment. 

Prerequisite: 65:553. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A560 Advanced Educational Psychology 

This course focuses on the learner and the learning process in school situa- 
tions. The topics include: motivation; acquisition of skills, ideas and attitudes; 
^^ technological and other innovations in teaching and learning; and evaluation of 
teaching-learning. 

Prerequisite: An introductory course in psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A561 Developmental Psychology 

Theoretical issues and research findings on mental processes from pre- 
natal life to senescence. 

J Prerequisite: One course in psychology. 

3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



■■1 



106 PSYCHOLOGY 

65:A562 Dynamics of Human Behavior 

Consideration is given to the relationship of social forces to mental health. 
Emphasis is placed on environmental factors which contribute towards behavioral 
and learning pathologies. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A563 Theories of Learning 

Reviews the phenomena of current learning theory and research and their 
implications for education. 

Prerequisite: Two courses in psychology or special permission of the in- 
structor. Some background in biology is recommended. (65:550) 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A564 Psychology and Education of Physically and Mentally Handicapped 
Children 

This course surveys current practices and problems in the education of the 
children with physical and mental handicaps. It is designed for teachers, coun- 
selors, supervisors, and administrators who may work with one or more such 
children or who may wish to prepare for school and community leadership in de- 
veloping facilities for such children. 

Prerequisite: A course in developmental psychology. 
3 semester hours Fail and Spring Semesters 

65:A565 Psychology and Education of Socially and Emotionally Handicapped 
Children 

This course surveys practice and problems in the education of socially and 
emotionally handicapped children. 

Prerequisite: A course in developmental psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A566 Psychology and Education of the Gifted 

This course is designed to present a complete picture of the bright and 
gifted young people in contemporary American life. It surveys the various prac- 
tices involved in their education, as well as the psychological characteristics of 
this group and socio-emotional development. 

Prerequisite: 65:561. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A567 Abnormal Psychology 

Models and selected research in psychopathology. Topics include: psy- 
chopathic physical illness, psychosomatic somatopsychic disorders, neurosis, 
psychosis, environmental factors in relation to organic factors. 

Prerequisite: 65:561, 580. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A568 Psychology of Group Dynamics 

This experience will combine a basic foundation in theories of group dy- 
namics and illustrative applications to industry, marital, political, interracial, and 
professional life, along with the personal participation by the student in a group, 
interactive process. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



PSYCHOLOGY 107 

65:A573 Physiological Psychology 

An investigation of physiological correlates of behavior with emphasis on 
the sensory apparatus as well as the major neuro-endocrine integrating relation- 
ships as seen in the more complex behaviors, such as emotion, the primary drives, 
and arousal states. 

Prerequisite: One course in psychology and biology or by special permis- 
sion of instructor. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A574 Individual Intelligence Testing 

Administration, scoring, and interpretation of individual intelligence tests. 
Each student is required to develop competence in the use of the Stanford-Binet 
Scale and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children. 

Prerequisite: Approved certification candidacy in the school psychology 
program. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A575 Projective Techniques I 

Presents the basic instruments of projective testing, particularly the Ror- 
schach and Thematic Apperception Tests, both from the standpoint of basic re- 
search and of the mechanics of administration and scoring. 

Prerequisite: Approved certification candidacy in the school psychology 
program. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A576 Projective Techniques II 

This course enables the student to move from the theoretical to the practical 
application of projective tests. Each student is required to administer, score 
and analyze individual cases. The major emphasis is on the Rorschach and The- 
matic Apperception Tests. 

Prerequisite: Projective Techniques II. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A578 Psychological Tests and Measurements 

Theory, construction and application of psychological tests. 
Prerequisite: 65:510 or 65:550. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A580 Personality 

Majortheories and clinical and experimental findings. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A581 Motivation 

Nature and development of motives and its role in social adjustment. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A582 Behavior Modification 

Surveys of issues, principles, practices and research with focus on recent 
innovations: individual, family, and group. 
Prerequisite: 65:563 or equivalent. 
jj 3 semester hours Spring Semester 



108 PSYCHOLOGY 

65:A590 Diagnostic Case Studies 

Learning to use diagnostic material and learning to write up diagnostic find- 
ings. Students are involved in the understanding of the unique value of various 
diagnostic tools and the criteria for selection of each in relation to the present 
school problem. 

Prerequisite: 65:575. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A592 Special Diagnostic Techniques 

This course is designed for students who are already competent in basic in- 
dividual testing techniques. Various specialized tests and techniques will be 
covered in this course with emphasis on the evaluation of handicapped children. 

Prerequisite: 65:574, 576 and permission of the graduate advisor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A593 Clinical interviewing 

This course provides selected trainees in advanced psychology programs 
with the opportunity to learn clinical interviewing under rigid supervision, and as 
an essential part of a practicum experience. Diagnostic features of interview- 
ing will be stressed, and inter-personal relationships between the psychologist 
and the client will be analyzed in depth. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the graduate advisor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A660 Seminar in Educational Psychology 

This seminar is designed primarily to provide an opportunity for graduate 
students in psychology to investigate and apply the techniques of research in 
the psychology field. 

Prerequisite: 65:510 and matriculation for M.A. degree in psychology or 
candidacy for certification in school psychology. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 

65:A661 Practicum in School Psychology 

Provides closely supervised experience by staff personnel in assessment, 
counseling and consultation procedures. Designed to increase competency in 
psychological techniques required in school settings. 

Prerequisite: Approved certification candidacy in the school psychology pro- 
gram and permission of the graduate advisor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A662 School Psychologist Externship 

Students are placed in cooperating school districts to serve as apprentice 
psychologists. A fully certified school psychologist employed in the cooperating 
district will supervise the student, in addition to the college supervisor, who will 
make periodic visits and conduct a series of seminars to be scheduled on campus. 

Prerequisite: Approved certification candidacy in school psychology. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

65:A663 Independent Study 

Under faculty supervision the student works independently in (1) reading, 
(2) field experiences, or (3) research outside of the thesis. Student selects one 
area per semester for 1 , 2, or 3 semester hours. 



PSYCHOLOGY 109 

Prerequisite: Permission from graduate advisor and instructor. 
1-3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A664 Praticum in Teaching Emotionally Disturbed Children i 

A practicum providing experience in relating to and teaching seriously and 
moderately emotionally disturbed children. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

65:A665 Praticum in Teaching Emotionally Disturbed Children II 

A continuation of 65:A664. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Psych. 670 Thesis I 

Individual research under faculty direction. Each student will present his 
thesis proposal at a department colloquim and take an oral examination upon 
completion of his thesis. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

Psych. 671 Thesis II 

Continuation of Psychology 670. 
Prerequisite: Permission of graduate advisor. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

Department of Sociology 

96:A100 The Sociological Perspective 

This is a survey course designed to provide a systematic introduction to 
various sociological explanations of human behavior. Emphasis is placed on the 
rendering of social life into a dispassionate but accurate body of knowledge. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

96:A206 Individual and Society 

Man as a biological, psychological and social being. The course centers on 
the socialization process and its effect on the individual, as well as the structure 
and function of groups. The various intellectual traditions associated with such 
names as Freud, Skinner, Mead, Schultz and Shibutani are compared and con- 
trasted. The significance of class, status, racial and ethnic variables in the sociali- 
zation process is discussed. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

96:A559 Sociology of Deviance 

An investigation is conducted of the efforts of such people as Lamert, Becker, 
Merton, Matza and others to develop sociological theories concerning crime, de- 
linquency, mental illness, and general issues which can be viewed as social prob- 
lems. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

96:A560 Sociological Theory 

The practical and philosophical methods of the seminal sociological theorists 
are investigated and evaluated in terms of many conceptions of adequate scien- 
tific procedures. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



110 PSYCHOLOGY 

96:A562 Social Change 

The focus of this course is on the dynamics of contemporary societies. Topics 
include sacred and secular movements, technological and cultural change, pro- 
test and revolution, and twentieth century nationalism. The effects of change are 
considered in relation to individuals, groups, institutions, and total societies. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

96:A563 Self and Society 

This course examines the relationship between the human individual and his 
social environment. Topics to be covered include the formation, maintenance, 
and transformation of self or identity, the structure and processes of small groups, 
symbolic communication, role theory, cognitive dissonance, and intergroup con- 
flict. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

96:A564 Social Planning 

A careful examination of the many elements and considerations that have to 
go into social planning for a community, a state, or a nation. Attention will be de- 
voted to the social context of planning, to the projective techniques employed, 
and to the many instrumentalities of social planning, such as budgets, master 
plans, development programs, and area proposals. The human, the economic, 
the ecological, and their related dimensions and facets will also be considered. 
Students will be expected to undertake a social planning project as a part of this 
course. A basic knowledge of statistics and the use of statistical data is desir- 
able. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

96:A565 Sociology of Youth 

The course examines socialization processes acting upon young people; 
the role of the family, neighborhood, school, and community; the effects of fail- 
ures in these socializing agencies; changing relations among age grades; and 
quantitative studies of the culture of youth with comparisons to other age grades. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

96:A566 The Metropolitan Community 

An examination of the many dimensions that make up the metropolitan com- 
munity. The course will include a consideration of the human factors involved, 
the problems an area faces, the political difficulties encountered, and the inter- 
relationship and interaction between the center city and the other component 
parts of the metropolitan community. Primary emphasis will be upon the New 
York-New Jersey metropolitan community. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

96:A572 Selected Problems in Sociology 

The seminar will be devoted to the intensive exploration of a general problem 
In Sociology. Participants will be expected to contribute to the seminar in the 
form of research into an aspect of the problem which is of interest to them. The 
seminar will be formed either at the initiative of a member of the Department, or 
in response to the interests of a group of students, upon the consent ot the in- 
structor. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 



PSYCHOLOGY 111 

96:A573-Sociology of the City Sub-areas 

There will be examination of the social forces in the inner city and other 
sub-areas with attention to the existing and emerging cultural strengths and posi- 
tive supportive patterns as, well as attention to problems related to poverty, 
housing, education, employment, leisure, and aesthetics. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

96:A579 Community Resources and Youth 

This course focuses attention on resources for youth: for the healthy as well 
as the deviate child. Emphasis is placed upon the resources in the child's own 
family and neighborhood, in addition to services provided by public and private 
agencies. Relevant federal and state legislation is also surveyed. 
3 semester hours Fall and Spring Semesters 



Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders 

97:A531 Advanced Audiology 

The purpose of this course is to increase skill in administering tests for de- 
termining pure-tone and speech reception thresholds. Emphasis is placed on 
evaluation and interpretation of test results and on the analysis of client histories. 
Principles and techniques of hearing aid evaluation, measurement of recruitment, 
and tests for psychogenic deafness and malingering are studied. Consideration 
is also given to pre- and post-surgical audiometry, and to the special problems 
of differential diagnosis in testing children. 

Prerequisite: 97:468. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

97:A571 Methods of Teaching the Deaf and Hearing Impaired 

Study of special methods of teaching from pre-school to the adult level with 
special emphasis on language development and compensatory learning. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A581A Diagnosis and Correction of Children with Learning Disabilities I 

Conceptual model of learning disabilities is presented. Emphasis will be on 
the parameters of the diagnostic evaluation of the child who is failing in school. 
Tests will be demonstrated and students will be trained in analyzing results and 
in prescribing an individualized educational plan. 
3 semester hours Fall Semester 

97:A581B Dignosis and Correction of Children with Learning Disabilities II 

A continuation of 97:A581A. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A583 Language Disorders of Children 

Study of psycholinguistic components of language, factors involved in lan- 
guage development, and language disorders associated with developmental lag, 
childhood aphasia, deafness, retardation and emotional problems. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 



112 COMMUNICATION SCIENCES AND DISORDERS 

97:A584 Cleft Palate and Oral Deformities 

Study of etiology and characteristics of cleft palate and oral deformities or 
malfunctions in children. Emphasis on speech therapy and surgical repair pro- 
cedures. Unit on tongue thrust therapy is also included. 

2 semester hours Fall Semester 

97:A585 Stuttering 

Principles and methods of speech therapy with children who stutter are 
studied. Methods of evaluation, specific techniques of speech therapy and 
principles coordinating speech therapy with home and with school life will be the 
IFocus of this practical course. Demonstration with children who stutter will serve 
as the basis for study and discussion. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 

97:A586 Education of the Handicapped 

Introduction to the field of special education with emphasis on the role of the 
teacher on the professional team, state, and federal legislation relating to the 
handicapped children and adults, and community resources for the special child. 
3 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A592 Seminar in Research in Speech Pathology 

Significant problems in the field of speech pathology are investigated and 
discussed and published research projects are evaluated. Attention is given to 
critical analysis and experimental design. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A593 Seminar in Research in Audiology 

Significant problems in the field of audiology are investigated and discussed 
and published research projects are evaluated. Attention is given to critical 
analysis and experimental design. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A595 Seminar in Research in Teaching the Deaf and Hearing Impaired 

Significant problems in the field of teaching the deaf and hearing impaired 
are investigated and discussed and published research projects are evaluated. 
Attention is given to critical analysis and experimental design. 
2 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A596 Seminar in Research in Learning Disabilities 

Significant problems in the field of learning disabilities are investigated and 
discussed and published research projects are evaluated. Attention is given to 
critical analysis and experimental design. 

2 semester hours Spring Semester 

97:A620 Orientation and Observation in Special Education 

Special education with an emphasis on community resources, professional 
roles and responsibilities, and team operations. On site visits to special classes 
and rehabilitation centers. 

3 semester hours Fall Semester 



LIBRARY SCIENCE 113 

LIBRARY SCIENCE COURSES 

30:200 Introduction to School Library Service 

An understanding of the functions and services of the school library in rela- 
tion to all other types of libraries is studied. The development of library service, 
books and printing, as well as censorship problems and the ethics of the library 
profession, are discussed. The concept of a materials center encompassing non- 
book materials is introduced. 
2 semester hours Fall Semester 

30:301,302 Reference and Bibliography, Parts I and II 

The reference and bibliography course is an examination and study of the 
basic reference materials with emphasis on those most useful in the school library. 
Encyclopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks, atlases, indexes, specialized reference 
books, and bibliographies in major subject fields are included. Training in the use 
of the catalog as a basic reference tool is stressed. 

Prerequisite: 30:301 for 30:302. 
2 semester hours each Spring Semester 

30:303 Fundamentals of Cataloging and Classification 

This course covers principles involved in the cataloging and classification of 
books, pamphlets, and non-book materials according to the Dewey Decimal Sys- 
tem. Extensive practice in the application of these principles is provided through 
laboratory experience. 

Prerequisite: 30:200 or the permission of the instructor. 
1 3 semester hours Spring Semester 

30:403 Reading Materials for Children and Youth: Selection and Evaluation 

This course consists of a study and evaluation of library materials provided 
by the modern school library to meet the needs of youth. Extensive critical read- 
ing of books for children and young adults is required. Principles of book selec- 
tion are emphasized and experience in the use of selection tools is provided. The 
point of view relates the library collection to the total school program. 
4 semester hours Fall Semester 

30:404 Organization and Administration of School Libraries 

Practical experience in setting up effective library routines is stressed. These 
outines include budgeting, locating sources for library materials, purchasing 
"naterials, book processing, preparing library reports and statistics, taking inven- 
ory, planning and adapting library rooms and equipment, and evaluating library 
:ollections and services. 

Prerequisite: either 30:301 or 302 or by permission of instructor. 
J semester hours Fall Semester 



1 



114 COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 



COURSE REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER, 1971 

Use the information below for completing the registration form. Refer to 
course descriptions and full titles under Course Offerings, beginning on 
page 37. Building codes may be found on page 35. 

"P" in the last column denotes a prerequisite for the course which may 
be found following the course description. 



Mas. 
No. 



Dept. 



Course 
No. 



Sect. 
No. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Curriculum and Instruction 



001 31 A400 I Tchr,School&Soc 

002 31 A400 2 Tchr,School&Soc 

003 31 A4I0 FieldExperEduc . 

004 31 A4I4 SupvTchgSem . 



005 
006 
007 
008 
325 

009 
010 
ON 
012 
013 
014 
015 



31 
31 
31 
31 
31 

31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 



A420 
A423 
A43I 
A440 
A450 

A516 
A530 
A530 
A532 
A533 
A533 
A640 



Instrlnnova+ions 

TchgUrbanSchools . . . 

JrHiSchCurr 

Curr&MethSexEd . . . . 
TchgStra+DevCrlt .... 
ThinkingPartl 

Stra+EdChange 

PrinCurrDev 

PrinCurrDev 

MidSchoolCurr&Organ 
CurrConstrSecSch . . . 
CurrConstrSecSch . . . 
WkspEd:Psy-SexEd ... 



Staff . . . 
Staff ... 
Dr. Walte 
Venturini, 



Mon 
Tues 
Mon 
Wed 



Michelll & Staff . 

Dr. Pines Wed 

Mr. Millard . . . .Tues 

Mr. Cuff Thurs 

Dr. Runden Tues 

Staff Mon 



Mr. MicheHi 
Mr. Salt . . . 
Dr. McElroy 



Wed 
.Wed 
. Mon 



Mr. Cuff Tues 



Mr, 
Dr. 
Dr. 



Salt . .. 
McElroy 
Runden 



Wed 
, Mon 
.Wed 



Educational Foundations and Comparative Studies 



016 


32 


A440 


017 


32 


A445 


018 


32 


A520 


019 


32 


A523 


020 


32 


A525 


021 


32 


A540 1 


022 


32 


A540 2 


023 


32 


A560 


024 


32 


A564 


025 




A5I0 1 


026 




A510 2 


027 




A5I3 1 


028 




A513 2 


029 




A52I 


030 




A523 


031 




A540 1 


032 




A540 2 



SocFoundEd 

PuertoRicanChildMain 
EdThoughtlSthCent . . 

ExistentialismEd 

EthProbEdPrac 

SocForces&Ed 3 

SocForces&Ed 3 

CompStudEdSys 3 

EducLatinAnnerica 3 



Dr. Cordasco . . 
Dr. Cordasco 
Mrs. Danzig . . . . 

Dr. Haas 

Staff 

Mrs. Bredemeier, 
Mrs. Bredemeier, 
Mr. Bernstein . . 
Mr. Bernstein . . 



Tues 

Thurs 

Mon 

Wed 

Thurs 

Tues 

Thurs 

Tues 

Wed 



Educational Leadership 



EducAdmin I 3 

EducAdmin I 3 

SecSchAdmin 3 

SecSchAdmin 3 

SchoolLaw 3 

SchPlantPlan 3 

Supervision 1 3 

Supervision 1 3 



Dr. Mosier Mon 

Dr. Lindemann . . Thurs 
Dr. Peckham . . . Mon 
Dr. Bellagannba . Tues 

Dr. Merlo Wed 

Dr. Merlo Tues 

Dr. Bellagannba .Tues 
Mr. Cuff Thurs 



7:30-10.00 
7:30-10.00 
5:00-7:30 
5:00 

7:30-10.00 
7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 
7:30-10.00 
7:30 

7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 



5:00-7:30 
5:00-7:30 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 



5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



H-004 

H-004 

E-012 

H-Aud 

H-004 
G-109 
G-109 
G-llO 
G-212 

G-109 
G-lll 
G-215 
G-215 
G-lll 
G-215 
G-217 



C-l 17 
H-003 
G-109 
G-215 
G-314 
G-215 
G-215 
G-216 
G-216 



H-004 
G-lll 
G-lll 
G-lll 
S-102 
S-102 
G-110 
G-llO 



COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 115 



as. D«pt. Course 

lo. No. No. 



Sect. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



U 33 A553 

lb 33 A560 

14 33 A565 

15 33 A6I9 
6 33 A628 



Educational Leadership (Continued) 

Ad&SupvAdul+ContEd .. 3 Staff Thurs 7:30-9:10 G-II2 

AmericanCollege 3 Dr. Richardson . Mon 7:30-9:10 C-307 

TwoYrJrCollege 3 Dr. Merlo Mon 7:30-9:10 S-102 

SemAd:Supv&Curr 2 Dr. Peckham . . . . Tues 5:00-6:40 G-II2 P 

FIdExplnAdm&Supv .... 2 Dr. Peckham . . . .To be arranged 



Educational Research and Evaluation 





A503 


1 




A503 


2 




A503 


3 




A503 


4 




A503 


5 




A604 






A507 






A578 


1 




A578 


2 



MethOfResearch 3 

MethOfResearch 3 

MethOfResearch 3 

MethOfResearch 3 

MethOfResearch 3 

ActResrchTchrs 3 

Measmnt&Eval I 3 

Test&Eval 3 

Test&Eval . . 3 



Dr. Lang Mon 

Dr. hieiss Tues 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Heiss Thurs 

Staff Sat 

Dr. Lang Mon 

Dr. Lang Tues 

Dr. Gelfond .... Tues 
Staff Sat 



7:30-9:10 


H-003 


5:00-6:40 


G-II8 


7:30-9:10 


S-102 


7:30-9:10 


G-306 


10:30-12:10 


S-102 


5:00-6:40 


H-003 


5:00-6:40 


H-003 


7:30-9:10 


G-217 


8:30-10:10 


S-102 



35 


A564 1 


35 


A564 2 


35 


A565 


35 


A568 


35 


A66I 


35 


A662 



36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
36 
■ 36 



A45I 
A45I 
A560 
A562 
A580 
A580 
A580 
A58I 
A582 
A582 
A585 
A585 
A586 
A587 
A588 
A650 
A654 
A654 
A655 
A680 



Hunnan Organizational Processes 

DynamlcsGroupProc ... 3 Dr. Gorman 

DynamicsGroupProc ... 3 Staff 

ConsulOrganDev 3 Dr. Gorman 

TheorConstrSocGrplnter 3 Mr. Tetens . 

GroupDevLab I 3 Dr. Gorman 

GroupDevLab II 3 Dr. Gregg . 



Per 



>IS< 



rsonnei services 



GuidClrmTchr 3 

GuidClrmTchr 3 

MedProbEduc 3 

SocCaseWork 3 

PrinGuid&Couns 3 



PrinGuId&Couns 

PrinGuId&Couns 

CommResourGuid . . . 
VocGuld&OccInf .... 
VocGuld&OccInf .... 
GrGuid&CounAct . . . 

GrGuid&CounAct 3 

ElemSchGuidSer 3 

Ad&SupvGuIdProgs .... 
Techlnterview&Coun . . . 
ResSem&ThesisWrit .... 
FldWrk&PractGuid&Coun 
FldWrk&PractGuid&Coun 
FIdWrk&PractSocWrk . . 
StudPersonServTeam . . . 



Mrs. Gaeng 
Mrs. Gaeng 
Dr. Williams 
Dr. Williams 
Mr. Grey . . 
Dr. Gregg . 
Mr. Mills . . 
Mr. Millard 
Dr. Kenyon 
Dr. Kenyon 
Mr. Millard 
Mr. Grey . . 
Dr. Gelfond 
Dr. Gelfond 
Mr. Mills . . 
Dr. Davis . . 
Mr. Grey . . 
Dr. Gregg . 
Dr. Williams 
Dr. Davis . . 



. Tues 
.Wed 
. Thurs 
.Wed 
. Tues 
.Thurs 



Tues 

Thurs 

Wed 

Wed 

Mon 

Tues 

Wed 

Mon 

Mon 

Tues 

Mon 

Wed 

Thurs 

Tues 

Wed 

Wed 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Tues 



5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 



7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9.10 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

5:00 6:40 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 



G-II3 
G-M3 
G-II3 
G-II3 
G-II3 
G-l 15 



E-OOl 
H-004 
G-l 18 
G-l 18 
G-l! 8 
G-206 
G-207 
G-207 
G-l 18 
G-l 18 
G-207 
G-209 
G-II8 
G-216 
G-207 
H-003 
G-215 
G-l 12 
G-216 
H-003 



37 


A500 


37 


A503 


37 


A505 


37 


A509 



Special Instructional Areas 

NatureOf Reading 3 Mr. Brunner . 

LitForAdolescents 2 Miss Schantz 

ResearchSemReading . . 2 Mr. Brunner . 

TchgCommSkills 3 Mr. Donarun' 



Mon 


5:00-6:40 


Gill 




Mon 


7:30-9:10 


G-l! 3 




Wed 


5:00-6:40 


C-109 




Tues 


7:30-9:10 


C-lll 


P 



116 COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 

S.H. Instructor Day Time 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. Title 



Special Instructional Areas (Continued) 

076 37 A5I0 FldExperRead 2 Miss Schantz .. .To be arranged 

077 37 A5II CaseStudReadDiff I .... 3 Mrs. Ward Thurs 7:30-9:10 

078 37 A5I3 Corr&RemReadPart I . . . 3 Miss Schantz ... Thurs 4:00-6:40 



079 37 A550 

080 37 A555 



EnvironnnentalEduc 3 Staff 

CurrEnvironEduc 3 Staff 



Mon 
Thurs 



Technology in Education 



3 Staff Mon 

3 Staff Wed 

3 Mr. Ruezinsky . . Mon 



081 38 A400 I Selec&UtilAudioMat 

082 38 A400 2 Selec&UtilAudioMat 

083 38 A520 I ProdAudiolnstrucMat: 

Part I Non-ProjMat 

084 38 A520 2 ProdAudiolnstrucMat: 

Part I Non-ProjMat 

085 38 A540 I TVProdSenninar 3 Staff Tues 



7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 



7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 
5:00-6:40 



7:30-9:10 



086 38 A540 2 TVProdSeminar 3 Mr. Diglio Thurs 7:30-9:10 



C-107, 
C-109. 
C-lll 
C-107. 
C-109, 
C-lll, 
C-II7 
G-109 
G-209 



C-I2I 
C-i2l 
C-I2I 



3 Mr. Ruezinsky . .Thurs 7:30-9:10 C-i2l 



C-I2I. 
C-129 
C-129 



087 


24 


A! 00 


088 


24 


AlOO 


090 


24 


A406A. 




B, C 


or D 


091 


24 


A4I0 


092 


24 

or B 


A4I9A 


094 


24 


A5IIA, 




B, C 


or D 


095 


24 


A52IA. 




B, C 


or D 


096 


24 


A53IA. 




B.C 


or D 


098 


24 


A552A. 




B,C 


or D 


099 


24 


A59I 


100 


24 


A603 



SCHOOL OF FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS 

Fine Arts 

IntroVIsualArts 3 Mr. deLeeuw . . .Tues 

IntroVisualArts 3 Miss O'Connell . Wed 

Photo:ContempArtForm 2 Staff Thurs 

1,11, IllorlV 

SelMasterWrldArt 3 Staff Tues 

LiteDraw I or II 2 Mr. Czerkowicz . Mon 

Painting 2 Staff Wed 

Sculpture 2 Mr, deLeeuw . . . Mon 

Ceramics:Pot&Scul 2 Staff Tues 

WoodcutPrintIng 2 Staff Wed 

SelProbArtHstry 3 Mr. Silver Mon 

SeminarlnArt 2 Staff Wed 



6:30-10:00 
6:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 
5:00-6:40 



L-229 
L-229 
L-I3I 

L-135 
L-22S 

L-227 1 

L-126 

L-129 

L-228 



Music 



102 60 AlOO 

103 60 A425 

104 60 A500 

105 60 A50I 

106 60 A503A 
and B 

107 60 A504 
and A505 



Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 

Staff Tues 5:00-6:40 

Staff To be Arranged 

Staff To be Arranged 

ApplMus I and'll: .... 2 ea. Staff To be Arranged 

Prinnlnstr 

ApplMus III and IV: . . . 6 ea. Staff To be Arranged 

Prinnlnstr 



IntroMusic 3 

LitOtOrchestra 2 

IndStudylnMusic 3-4 

PrivStudylnConnp I 3 



M-015 
M-0I5 



Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. 



Title 



COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 117 
S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



08 


60 


A506, 




507 


and 508 


09 


60 


A5I0A 


10 


60 


A5II 


II 


60 


A5I9 


12 


60 


A520B 


13 


60 


A53I 


4 


60 


A600 


5 


60 


320 


6 


21 


A 100 1 


7 


21 


AlOO 2 


8 


21 


A 150 


9 


21 


A502 


D 


21 


A552 


il 


2! 


A553 


1 


21 


A554 


1 


21 


A563 


■ 


21 


A565 



Music (Con+inued) 

VI and VIII: 4 ea. Staff To be Arranged 



20 A 1 05 

20 A 1 05 

20 AI05 

20 AI05 

20 A 1 06 

20 A 1 06 

30 A 1 06 

20 A246 

20 A260 

20 A274 

20 A364 



I 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



41 
f 41 
5( 4! 
)l 41 

y, 41 



I 



A5I0 

A5I lA 

A5I2 

A525 

A535B 

A536 

A539 

A603 



AIOOA 

A200A 

A505 

A526 

A544 



ApplMus V 
Prinnlns+r 

ApplMus.-Seclnstr 2 

Theo&AuralSkills ..:.... 3 
InMusic: I 

KodalySysMusEd 

Prob&MatChoralMusi'c 
EnsblrChor I 
IndStudvlnMusic 
TchngMusicK-6 



Staff 



^^ To be Arranged 



Mr. Wilt 



Mon 7:30-10:00 M-OI 



Staff 
Staff 



Wed 
Wed 



7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
4:00-4:50 



Dr. Morse Tu&Th 

S+^ff • ■ To be Arranged 

S+aff . .' Tu&Th 5:00-6:00 



Speech and Theater 



FundannentalsSpeech 

FundamentalsSpeech 

Art&HistRadio&TV 

TheaterManagement 

InternlnDramProd 

InternlnOralComm 

Intern I nRadio&TVComm 

ScenicDesign 

AdvOral Interpretation 



3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Mr. Stoll Tues 

3 Staff To be a 

3 Staff To be a 

3 Staff To be a 

3 Mr. MacConnel . Mon 

2 Dr. Fox Wed 



SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 



Comp&Literature I . . . 
Comp&Literature I . . . . 
Comp&Literature I . . . . 
Comp&Literature I . . . . 
Comp&Literature II . . . 
Comp&Literature II . . . 
Comp&Literature II . . . 

RenaissanceLit 

Myth&Literature 

ModDrama: 

IsbenToO'Neill 

ContempPoetry: 

AudenToPresent 

Wordsworth&Coleridge 

LitCriticismTolSOO 

HistOfEnglishLang 

Poe, Hawthorne, Melville 

John son, Gray, Goldsmith 

ModAmerPoetry 

Theater&Society 

EnglishResearchWritinq 



English 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Dr. McGee M&W 

3 Mrs. Frignoca . .Tu&Th 

2 Dr. Earley M&W 

2 Dr. Barschi Tu&Th 

3 Dr. Schwegel . . .Wed 
3 Dr. hianson .... Tues 
3 Mr. Reaske Sat 

3 Dr. Healey Mon 

3 Dr. Radner Men 

3 Dr. Healey Thurs 

3 Dr. Earley Tues 

3 Mr. Pettegrove . Thurs 



French 



M-013 
M-013 
M-013 

M-013 



6:30-7:45 


A-IOI 


6:30-7:45 


A-IOI 


8:00-9:15 


A-IOI 


7:30-9:10 


A- 102 


rranged 




rranged 




rranged 




5:00-6:40 


A- 104 


5:00-6:40 


A- 104 



BeginningFrench I 3 

IntermFrench I 3 

HistryFrenchLang 2 

Corneille&RacIne 3 

ContempNovel I 3 



Staff M&W 

Mrs. Sergent . . . M&W 
Mr. Hinshalwood Wed 

Dr. Glick Tues 

Dr. Kllbbe Mon 



6:30-7:45 


G-IIO 


8:00-9:15 


G-IIO 


6:30-7:45 


G-207 


8:00-9:15 


G-207 


6:30-7:45 


G-208 P 


8:00-9:15 


G-208 P 


6:30-7:45 


G-208 P 


6:30-7:45 


G-II2 


8:00-9:15 


G-208 


8:00-8:50 


G-206 


6:30-7:20 


G-II5 


7:30-10:00 


G-214 


7:30-10:00 


G-209 


10:30-1:00 


G-208 


7:30-10:00 


G-214 


7:30-10:00 


G-209 


7:30-10:00 


G-l 10 


7:30-10:00 


G-l 12 


7:30-10:00 


G-217 


8:00-9:15 


G-II2 


8:00-9:15 


G-li5 P 


7:30-9:10 


G-312 


5:00-6:40 


G-209 


5:00-6:40 


G-209 



118 COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 

S.H. Instructor Day 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



Time 



153 46 AIOOA 

1 54 46 A200A 

155 46 A524 

156 46 A533 

157 46 A540 

158 46 A550 

159 46 A603 

160 49 AIOOA 

161 49 A200A 



162 63 AI90 



Spanish and Italian 



BeginSpanish I 3 

In+ermSpanish I 3 

SemlnCervantes 3 

Con+empSpanishTheater 3 

Sarmiento&HisTimes ... 3 

Span-AmerTheaterTol9IO 3 

SpanishResearchSem ... 3 

Beginltalian I 3 

Interml+alian I 3 



Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Dr. Prieto 'Mon 



Dr. Barbeito 
Dr. Rivera . 

Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Battista 



Tues 
Thurs 
Wed 
To be 
Tu&Th 



Staff Tu&Th 



6:30- 
8:00- 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 
arrang 
6:30 
8:00 



■7:45 

-9:15 

-6:40 

-6:40 

-6:40 

-6:40 

ed 

-7:45 

-9:15 



Philosophy and Religion 

IntroToReligion 3 Mr. Streetman . .Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 



G-309 
G-309 
G-214 
G-214 
G-214 
G-214 

G-308 
G-308 



G-316 



164 81 A46I 

165 81 ASK 

166 81 A530X 

167 81 A570 



1 68 80 A505 

1 69 82 A52 1 

1 70 82 A548 



171 80 Alio 

172 80 A4I8 

173 84 AlOl 

1 74 84 A406 



175 


84 


A517 


178 


50 


AI05 


179 


50 


Alio 


180 


50 


A403 


181 


50 


A420X 


182 


50 


A42SX 


183 


50 


A46IX 


184 


50 


A521 


185 


50 


A525 


186 


50 


A535 


187 


50 


A540 


188 


50 


A554 


189 


50 


A57I 


190 


50 


A573 


191 


50 


A58I 



SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES 

Biology 

Limnology 3 Dr. McCormick . Sat 

Biol&ProbOfSociety .... 2 Mrs. Kane Tues 

AnimalBehavior 3 Mrs. Gona Tues 

Ecology 3 Dr. Shubeck Sat 



8:30-12:30 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
8:30-12:30 



ResearchSemlnScience 
TheorlnorganicChemistry 
ChemicalKinetics 



Chemistry 

2 Dr. Becker Wed 5:00-6:40 

3 Dr. Lynde Tu&Th 5:00-6: 1 5 

3 Dr. Gallopo ....Tu&Th 7:30-8:45 



Physics/Geoscience 



DescriptAstronomy 3 Dr 

ThreeCentSciProg 2 Mr, 

PrinOfGeology 3 Mr 

InvertePalentology 4 Mr 



Kowalski . . . .Tu&Th 
Minor M&W 



Ramsdel 
Ramsdel 



M&W 
Tues 

Thurs 



Geophysics 3 Dr. Thiruvathukal Ti 



Mathematics 



EleOfStatReasoning 2 

IntroAlg&Anaylsis 3 

Techniq&ApplicOfStat . . 2 

DifferntlEquations 2 

AdvCalculus I 2 

IntroToComputerSci .... 2 

RealVariables I 3 

ComplexVariables I . . . . 3 

LinearAlgebra I 3 

Probability 3 

ProjectiveGeometry .... 3 

CurrConstrlnMath 3 

MathMatForTchrOfMath 3 

SystemsProgrannming ... 3 



Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Dr. Haft Tues 

Mr. McConnell . Mon 
Mr. Dennetrop'los Mon 
Dr. Orfinger . .. .Wed 

Dr. Chai .Thurs 

Dr. Parzynski . . . Mon 
Mr. Westphal . .Wed 

Dr. Haft Tues 

Mr. Stevens . . . .Thurs 
Mr. Lacatena . . .Thurs 
Dr. Maletsky . . .Tues 
Mr. Gugel Wed 



6:30-7:45 

6:30-7:20 

8:00-9:15 

5:00-6:30 

(Lecture) 

7:00-10:00 

(Lab) 

7:30-10:00 



6:30-7:20 
8:00-9:15 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 



V-353 
F-209 
F-210 
V-359 



F-204 
F-204 
F-204 



V-259 
V-265 
B-004 
B-004 

B-004 

V-262 



F-105 
F-105 
V-161 
V-163 
V-161 
V-161 
V-161 
V-163 
V-154 
V-161 
V-161 
V-163 
V-154 
V-154 



COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 119 



Mas. Dept. Course 
No. No. No. 



Sect. 
No. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



Bide. 
Rm. 



Pre- 
req. 



337 10 A40I 

192 10 A402 

193 10 A434 

194 10 A50I 

195 10 A5II 

196 10 A530 

197 10 A603 



SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Business Education 

Prin&MethOfTchgGenBus 2 Staff Tues 5:00-6:40 C-317 

PrIn&MethOfTchgAcctg 2 Staff Thurs 7:30-9:10 C-316 

IntroBusDataProcessing . 3 Mr. Stein Wed 7:30-10:00 C-307 

Prin&ProbOfBusEd 3 Dr. Nanassy , . . . Tues 7:30-9:10 C-316 

ImprOflnstrlnBkkpg, .... 3 Dr. Freeman .... Tues 5:00-6:40 C-316 
Acctg&BusArith 

BusEdlnPostHiSchlnst . . . 3 Staff Thurs 7:30-9:10 C-317 

SemlnBusEd 3 Dr. Nanassy Thurs 5:00-6:40 C-316 



Distributive Education 



198 II A452 
200 I I A454 



PrinOfVocEd 2 Dr. 

Prin&MethOfTchgDIstrib 3 Dr. 
Ed&Coord 



Hecht Wed 

Hecht Wed 



5:00-6:40 
7:30-10:00 



C-310 
C-310 



Business Administration 



AlOl 
A20I 
A20I 
A30I 
A3 10 
A406 
A408 
A423 



)9 


26 


AlOl 


10 


26 


A435 


II 


26 


A5I0 


2 


26 


A520 


3 


26 


A530 


p 


26 


407 


h 


26 


420 


\2 


26 


432 



PrinOfBusMgement .... 3 

Accounting I — Financial 3 

Accounting I — Financial 3 

Accounting III — Interm . 3 

Personnel Mgement .... 3 

Advertising 2 

FinanceManagement ... 3 

BuyingForDistribution . . 2 

Home Econ( 

Fam:lnterdiscAppr 3 



Staff Tu&Th 



Staff. 
Staff 
Staff 



M&W 
Tu&Th 
M&W 



Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 



ProgPlanlnErlyChildEd . 3 

IntrDiscipStudOfFamily 3 

DynamOfFannlylnteract . 2 

MgementOfFannlyResourc 3 

ConsumerAction 3 

TchgFamlyLivlnPubSch . . 2 

WonnenlnContempSociety 3 



Mrs. Graef . . . 
Mrs. Silver . . . 
Miss Guthrie . 
Dr. Rappaport 
Mrs. Alcaro . . 
Miss Guthrie . 

Staff 

Dr. Ruslink . . . 



Tu&Th 

Wed 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Tues 



30-7:45 
30-7:45 
00-9:15 
00-9:15 
00-9:15 
30-7:20 
30-7:45 
00-8:50 



6:30-7:45 
5:00-7:30 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
M,W&F 4:00-4:50 
Tues 5:00-6:40 
Mon 5:00-7:00 



C-307 
C-318 
C-318 
C-318 
C-307 
C-310 
C-316 
C-310 



G-312 
F-107 
F-104 
F-104 
F-104 
K-231 
F-104 
F-107 



Industrial Education and Technology 



28 Alio 

28 AI20 

28 A270 

28 A280 

28 A333 

28 A34I 

28 A353 

28 A36I 

28 A404A, 
Band C 

28 A490 

28 A49 1 

28 A50I 

28 A509 



FoundOfDesign 3 

GraphicConnm 3 

ElectricityFund 

FoundOf Industry — Power 
Black&WhitePhotog .... 

MachineWoodwork 

PlastMold&Formg III ... 

MachineMetalTech 

IndStudlnlndustry 



JwlryMkg&Lapdry . . . . 

ConstrTech 

CurrConstr&CrseOrgan 

InlndustrialEd 

CurrConstrlnVocTechEd 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1-3 

3 
3 
3 



Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 
Staff 



Mr. Endres 

Staff 

Dr. Rosser . 



2 Staff Mon 



Tues 


6:30-10:00 


F-219 




Mon 


6:30-10:00 


F-219 




Wed 


6:30-10:00 


F-225 




Thurs 


6:30-10:00 


F-i;9 




Mon 


6:30-10:00 


F-II7 




Tues 


6:30-10:00 


F-l 18 




Thurs 


6:30-10:00 


F-223 




Wed 


6:30-10:00 


F-l 19 




To be 


arranged 






Thurs 


6:30-10:00 


F-II8 




Mon 


6:30-10:00 


F-l 18 


P 


Wed 


7:30-9:10 


V-259 




Mon 


7:30-9:10 


V-259 





120 



COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



228 28 A60IA, 
Band C 

229 28 A603 



Industrial Education and Technology (Continued) 

IndS+udylnl.A 1-3 Staff To be arranged 

ResearchSemlnLA 3 Dr. Earl Wed 5:00-6:40 



V-259 



230 29 A4I4 

231 29 A471 



234 73 A408 

235 73 A4I3 

236 73 A4I4 

237 73 A5I6 

238 73 A525 

239 73 A529 

240 73 A603 

241 76 A554 

242 76 A575 

243 76 A578 

244 76 A579 

245 76 A603 



Vocational Education 

Prin&PhilOfVocTechEd .. 3 Mr. V'Benscho+en Wed 

Voc-Techln-ServSupv ... 8 Mr. V'Benscho+en Tues 
TchgSem 

Health and Physical Education 

DriverEduca+ion 3 Dr. Coder Mon 

DrugAbuseProb 2 Dr. Hoitsnna .... Wed 

WksplnVenerealDiseaseEd 2 Staff Thurs 

Comm&EnvironAspec+s . 3 Staff Tues 

OfHeal+h 

Hist&FoundOfHeal+h ... 3 Dr. Hoitsma Tues 

SennBaslssuesHeal+h .... 3 Staff Mon 

ResearchSennHealthEd .. 3 Dr. Hotisnna ....Thurs 

OrientlnSpor+sMedicine 3 Dr. Horn Mon 

Phil&SociolFoundPhysEd 3 Dr. Wacker . . . . Tues 

PhysEdExcep+nlChlld ... 3 Staff Mon 

AdvTests&Meas 3 Dr. Tews Wed 

ResearchSemPhysEd .... 3 Dr. Schleede ...Thurs 



7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 



C-320 
C-320 



6:30-10:00 


C-II7 


7:30-9:10 


F-105 


7:30-9:10 


G-214 


7:30-9:10 


G-II5 


5:00-6:40 


P-005 


7:30-9:10 


C-310 


5:00-6:40 


P-005 


7:30-9:10 


G-lll 


7:30-9:10 


P-005 


7:30-9:10 


P-005 


7:30-9:10 


P-005 


7:30-9:10 


P-005 



248 91 A200 

249 9! A53I 

250 91 A538 



251 


92 


AI02 


252 


92 


A54I 


253 


93 


AlOO 


254 


93 


A305 


255 


93 


A502 


338 


90 


A4I0 


256 


90 


A603 


257 


94 


AlOO 


258 


94 


AI03 1 


259 


94 


AI03 2 


260 


94 


Al II I 


26! 


94 


AIM 2 


262 


94 


AI22 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 
Anthropology 



CulturalAnthro 3 

hlumanVariation 3 

E+hnopsychology 3 



Dr. Maloney . 
Mrs. Tatkon . . 
Drs. Quintana, 
Floyd 



.Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 

.Wed 5:00-6:40 

Tues 5:00-6:40 



Economics 



PrinOfEcon:Micro 3 

FoundOfCon+empEconThot 3 



Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 

Dr. Kronlsh . .. .Tues 5:00-6:40 



Geography 



PrinOfGeography 3 

GeogOfEast&SEAsia ... 3 
AdvCulturalGeog 3 



Mr. Ballwanz . . . M&W 6:30-7:45 

Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 

Dr. Sternberg ..Tues 5:00-6:40 



History 



NewspaperlnCIrm 

ReadgSemlnHist&SocSci 

StudyOfAmerHist 

DevOf Early Western Civil 

DevOfEarlyWesternCivil 

SelToplnAmerHistTol876 

SelToplnAnnerHistTol876 

l9CentEurope,l8l5-l9l4 



2 Mr. Michelli . . .Tues 

2 Staff Sat 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Mr. Macaluso . . M&W 

3 Mr. Bell Tu&Th 

3 Staff M&W 

3 Staff Tu&Th 

3 Staff Tu&Th 



5:00-6 
10:30- 
8:00-9 
6:30-7 
6:30-7 
8:00-9 
8:00-9 
6:30-7 



:40 

12:10 

:I5 

:45 

:45 

:I5 

:I5 

:45 



F-i06 
C-II7 
C-lll 



F-106 
G-217 



C-304 
S-IOI 
C-304 



G-317 
C-307 

S-IOI |] 
G-307 
G-307 
G-307 
G-307 

F-105 ih 



COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 121 



Dept. Course 
No. No. 



Sect. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



Bide. 
Rm. 



Pre- 
req. 



History (Continued) 



263 94 A 1 32 

264 94 A323 

265 94 A5I2 

266 94 A5I7 

267 94 A525 

268 94 A530 



DevO-fChineseCivil .... 3 

HistOfRussiaTol9l7 ... 3 

AmerRevol,l763-l787 .. 3 

AgeOfFDR 3 

HistOfSovIetlnst 3 

NationlnModlndia 3 



Mr. Shapiro .... M&W 6:30-7:45 F-104 

Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 F-104 

Dr. Royer Wed 5:00-6:40 G-209 

Mr. Kops Tues 7:30-9:10 G-206 

Staff . . . Thurs 5:00-6:40 G-217 

Dr. More Tues 5:00-6:40 G-212 



Political Science 



269 95 A200 

270 95 A402 

271 95 A404 
I 272 95 A408 

273 95 A502 



274 65 A 1 00 

275 65 A 1 00 

276 65 AlOl 

277 65 AlOl 

278 65 A20I 

279 65 A270 

280 65 A5I0 

281 65 A520 

>82 65 A538 

83 65 A54I 



A549 
A550 
A552 
A552 
A553 
A553 
A560 
A560 
A560 
A56I 
A56I 
A56I 
A56I 
A562 
A563 
A564 
A565 
A565 
A567 
A573 
A574 
A575 
A578 
A580 
A660 



84 


65 


85 


65 


86 


65 


87 


65 



88 65 
19 65 



65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
J2 65 
»'3 65 
65 
65 
65 
65 
65 



IntroPolSci 3 

Govern&PolOfAfrica ... 3 

Govern&PolOfSouthAsia 3 

DevOfPolThotToHegel . . 3 

ModPolAnalysis 3 



Staff M&W 

Mr. Utete Thurs 

Dr. Johnson .... Wed 
Mr. Menake .... Tues 
Mr. Utete Wed 



Psychology 



GeneralPsych 

GeneralPsych 

hi u m Growth & Develop 
HumGrowth& Develop 

ChildPsych 

PsychlnBus&Ind 

ResrchMethlnPsych . . 
Proseminar I 



Ethnopsychology 3 



CurrDev&MethOfTchg . . 
InnerCityChild 
Psych&AdultLearner . . . . 
Quant&StatistMeths . . . . 

GenSocPsych 

GenSocPsych 

UrbanPsych 

UrbanPsych 

AdvEducPsych 

AdvEducPsych 

AdvEducPsych 

DevelopmentalPsych . . . . 
DeveiopnnentaiPsych . . . . 
DevelopmentalPsych . . . . 
DevelopmentalPsych . . . . 
DynamHumBehavior . . . . 
TheoriesOfLearning . . . . 
Psy&EdPhy&MntHdpChn 
Psy&EdSoc&EmtHdpChn 
Psy&EdSoc&EmtHdpChn 

AbnormalPsych 

PhysiologicalPsych 

IndlvidlntellTesting 

ProjTechs I 

PsychTests&Meas 

Personality 

SemlnEducPsych 



Staff M&W 

Dr. Cicerone . . . Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Mr. Badin Tu&Th 



Dr. Cicerone 
Miss Garcia, 
Dr. Kraemer 
Dr. Floyd. 
Dr. Quintana 
Mrs. Litovsky 



Tues 
Wed 

Tues 

Mon 



Staff Wed 

Dr. Rotter Thurs 

Mr. Firestone . . . Mon 
Mr. Gologor . . . Tues 

Dr. Koppel Mon 

Dr. Williams . . Thurs 

Staff Mon 

Miss hierman . . . Tues 
Dr. Seidman . . . Wed 
Dr. Shapiro .... Mon 

Dr. Hauer Tues 

Dr. hiauer Tues 

Staff Wed 

Staff Mon 

Dr. Haupt Wed 

Dr. Duryea Thurs 

Dr. Kraemer .... Tues 
Dr. Sugarman ..Wed 



Dr. Brower . 
Miss Garcia 
Dr. Shapiro 
Dr. Seymour 
Dr. Seidman 
Dr. Brown . . 
Dr. Brower . 



Tues 
Thurs 
Mon 
Wed 
Mon 
Wed 
Thurs 



6:30-7:45 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 



6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 

8:00-9:15 

6:30-7:45 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 



F-106 
G-206 

V-I6I 
G-214 
G-306 P 



G-206 
G-316 
G-316 
G-316 
F-107 
F-107 
E-013 
E-013 



E-012 
E-OOl 
G-II5 
G-314 
G-314 
G-314 
G-314 
G-314 
G-308 
G-315 
G-315 
G-315 
G-315 
G-315 
G-315 
G-315 
G-317 
G-314 
S-102 
G-317 
E-012 
E-OOl 
E-OOl 
G-309 
E-012 



C-lll P 



E-013 P 



122 COURSE SCHEDULES-FALL SEMESTER 

Mas. D0pt. Course Sect. ...... 

No. No. No. No. Title S.H. Instructor Day Time 

Psychology (Continued) 

309 65 A663 IndependentS+udy 3 Staff To be arranged 

310 65 A664 Prac+TchgEmtDistrChild . 3 Staff To be arranged 

311 65 A670 Thesis I 3 Staff To be arranged 

Sociology 

Individ&Soc 3 Staff Tu&Th 

SocialChange 3 Dr. Thomas Thurs 

SociologyOfYouth 3 Dr. Thonnas Wed 

SelProblnSociology 3 Dr. Kim Tues 

SocioCitySub-Areas .... 3 Dr. Alloway .... Mon 

317 96 A579 I CommResources&Youth . 3 Staff Tues 

318 96 A579 2 CommResources&Youth . 3 Staff Thurs 

Communication Sciences and Disorders 

320 97 A53I AdvAudiclogy 3 Dr. Schon Mon 5:00-6:40 K-129 

321 97 A58IA DIag&CorrChildWith . . . 3 Dr. Heiss Thurs 7:30-9:10 K-129 

LearningDisabilities I 

322 97 A584 CleftPalate&OralDeform 2 Mr. Caracciolo .Tues 5:00-6:40 K-129 

323 97 A585 Stuttering 3 Dr. Shulman . . . . Tues 7:30-9:10 K-129 

324 97 A620 Orient&ObservaSpecEd 3 Dr. Heiss Thurs 5:00-6:40 K-129 

Library Science 

IntroSchLibraryService . . 2 Miss Gibson ...Thurs 4:00-5:40 S-102 

RdgMatChild&Youth ... 4 Miss Gibson . . . M,T,W,F5:00-5:50 S-102 

Organ&AdmSchLibrary . 3 Miss Gibson . . . M.W.F 4:00-4:50 S-102 



312 


96 


A206 


313 


96 


A562 


314 


96 


A565 


315 


96 


A572 


316 


96 


A573 



6:30-7:45 


B-002 


5:00-6:40 


G-212 


7:30-9:10 


G-306 


5:00-6:40 


V-163 


5:00-6:40 


G-2i2 


7:30-9:10 


G-306 


7:30-9:10 


G-216 



334 


30 


200 


335 


30 


403 


336 


30 


404 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 



123 



DAILY SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 
FALL SEMESTER, 1971 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Monday 4:00 P.M. 

330 26 407 

336 30 404 



Monday 5:00 P.M. 



123 


21 


A563 


332 


26 


432 


335 


30 


403 


003 


31 


A4I0 


014 


31 


A533 2 


018 


32 


A520 


025 


33 


A5I0 1 


027 


33 


A5I3 1 


042 


34 


A504 


056 


36 


A580 1 


062 


36 


A585 1 


072 


37 


A500 


083 


38 


A520 1 


152 


41 


A544 


155 


46 


A524 


182 


50 


A425X 


185 


50 


A525 


286 


65 


A552 1 


288 


65 


A553 1 


293 


65 


A56I 1 


316 


96 


A573 


320 


97 


A53I 


Noonday 6:30 P.M. 


202 


12 


A20I 1 


207 


12 


A408 


128 


20 


AI05 1 


132 


20 


A 106 1 


' 135 


20 


A246 



116 21 AlOO 

216 28 AI20 

219 28 A333 

225 28 A49I 

178 50 AI05 



Consumer Action 

(Also nnee+s Wednesday and Friday) 
Organization and Adnninistra+ion of a 

School Library 

(Also meets Wednesday and Friday) 

Scenic Design 

Women in Contemporary Society 

Reading Materials for Children and Youth . . 
(Also meets Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday] 

Field Experiences in Education 

Curriculum Construction in the 

Secondary School 

Educational Thought to the 18th Century . . . , 

Educational Administration I 

Secondary School Administration 

Action Research for Teachers 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling 

Group Guidance and Counseling Activities . 

The Nature of Reading 

Production of Audiovisual Instructional 

Materials: Part I Non-Projected Material 

The Contemporary Novel I 

Seminar in Cervantes 

Advanced Calculus I 

Complex Variables I 

General Social Psychology 

Urban Psychology 

Developmental Psychology 

Sociology of the City Sub-Areas 

Advanced Audiology 

Accounting I — Financial 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Finance Management 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Renaissance Literature 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Graphic Communications 

Black and White Photography 

Construction Technology 

Elements of Statistical Reasoning 

(Also meets Wednesday) 



Miss Guthrie K-231 

Miss Gibson S-102 

Mr. MacConnell . . A-104 

Dr. Ruslink F-104 

Miss Gibson S-102 

Dr. Walter E-012 

Dr. McElroy G-215 

Mrs. Danzig G-109 

Dr. Mosier H-004 

Dr. Peckham G-ll I 

Dr. Lang H-003 

Staff G-II8 

Mr. Millard G-207 

Mr. Brunner G-l I I 

Mr. Ruezlnsky C-I2I 

Dr. Klibbe G-209 

Dr. Prieto G-214 

Mr. Demetropoulos V-I6I 

Dr. Parzynski V-163 

Mr. Firestone G-l 1 5 

Dr. Koppel G-314 

Dr. Shapiro G-315 

Dr. Alloway G-212 

Dr. Schon K-129 

Staff C-318 

Staff C-316 

Staff G-l 10 

Staff G-208 

Dr. McGee G-l 12 

Staff A-IOI 

Staff F-219 

Staff F-II7 

Staff F-II8 

Staff F-105 



124 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Monday 6:30 P.M. (Continued) 

274 65 AlOO I General Psychology 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
276 65 AlOl I Human Growth and Development 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

234 73 A408 Driver Education 

172 80 A4I8 Three Centuries of Science Progress 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
253 93 AlOO Principles of Geography 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
258 94 AI03 I Development of Early Western Civilization .. 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
263 94 A! 32 Development of Chinese Civilization 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
269 95 A200 Introduction to Political Science 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Monday 7:30 P.M. 

142 20 A525 Poe, Hawthorne, Melville 

143 20 A535B Johnson, Gray, Goldsmith 

092 24 A4I9A, Life Drawing I or II 

or B 

095 24 A52IA. Sculpture 

B, Cor D 

099 24 A59 1 Selected Problems in Art History 

227 28 A509 Curriculum Construction in Vocational- 
Technical Education 

001 3! A400 I Teacher, School and Society 

325 31 A450 Teaching Strategies to Develop Critical 

Thinking Part I 

Oil 3! A530 2 Principles of Curriculum Development .... 

326 33 A560 The American College 

034 33 A565 The Two Year Junior College 

037 34 A503 I Methods of Research 

059 36 A58i Community Resources for Guidance 

060 36 A582 I Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information 

073 37 A503 Literature for Adolescents 

079 37 A550 Environmental Education 

08! 38 A400 I Selection and Utilization of 

Audiovisual Materials 

181 50 A420X Differential Equations . .' 

NO 60 A5II Theoretical and Aural Skills in Music: I ... . 

283 65 A54I Curriculum Development and Methods of 

Teaching Inner City Children 

290 65 A560 I Advanced Educational Psychology 

297 65 A562 Dynamics of Human Behavior 

304 65 A574 Individual Intelligence Testing 

306 65 A578 Psychological Tests and Measurements 

239 73 A529 Seminar in Basic Issues in Health 

241 76 A554 Orientation in Sports Medicine 

243 76 A578 Physical Education for Exceptional Children 

Monday 8:00 P.M. 

204 12 A30I Accounting III— Intermediate 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
129 20 AI05 2 Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Wednesday) 



Staff G-206 

Staff G-316 

Dr. Coder . C-II7 

Mr. Minor V-265 

Mr. Ballwanz C-304 

Mr. Macaluso G-307 

Mr. Shapiro F-IO+ 

Staff F-I06 



Dr. Healey G-21 

Dr. Radner ....... G-209~ 

Mr. Czerkowicz .... L-225 

Mr. deLeeuw L-126 



Mr. Si 



L-I08 



Staff V-259 

Staff H-004 I 

Staff G-21 2 

Dr. McElroy G-215 

Dr. Richardson .... C-307 

Dr. Merlo "S-102 

Dr. Lang H-003 

Mr. Millard G-207 

Dr. Kenyon G-II8 

Miss Schantz G-l 13 

Staff .. G-109 



Staff 

Mr. McConnel 
Mr. Wilt 



C-I2I 
V-163 
M-OII 



Mrs. Litovsky E-013 

Staff G-3M 

Staff G-315 

Dr. Shapiro E-012 

Dr. Seidman E-OOl 

Staff C-3IC 

Dr. Horn G-IM 

Staff P-OOE 



Staff 
Staff 



C-3I( 
G-IK 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 



125 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



Bids. & Rm. 



Monday 8:00 P.M. (Continued] 



133 20 



137 20 



I 18 
148 
149 
102 
277 



21 



41 



AI06 
A274 
A 1 50 
A 1 00 A 



2 



41 A200A 



60 
65 



AlOO 
AlOl 



173 84 AlOl 



260 
264 



94 AIM 



94 A323 



Tuesday 4:00 P.M. 

113 60 A53I 

Tuesday 5:00 P.M. 

191 10 A40I 

195 10 A5II 

331 26 420 
330 30 403 

016 32 A440 

021 32 A540 

030 33 A523 

031 33 A540 
035 33 A6I9 





! 038 


34 


A503 




1 043 


34 


A507 




046 


35 


A564 




1 057 


36 


A580 




065 


36 


A587 




151 


41 


A526 




156 


46 


A533 




180 


50 


A403 




190 


50 


A573 




115 


60 


320 



103 60 A4I3 
m\ 282 65 A538 



287 65 
294 65 



A552 
A56I 



Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Modern Drama: Ibsen to O'Neill 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Art and History of Radio and Television . . . . 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Beginning French I 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Intermediate French I 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Introduction to Music 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

hluman Growth and Development 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Principles of Geology 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Selected Topics in American History to 1876 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

History of Russia to 1917 

(Also meets Wednesday) 



Ensemble: Chorus I . 
(Also meets Thursday) 



Principles and Methods of Teaching 

General Business 

Improvement of Instruction in Bookkeeping, 

Accounting and Business Arithmetic 

Teaching Family Living in the Public Schools . 
Reading Materials for Children and Youth . . , 
(Also meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday] 

Sociological Foundations of Education 

Social Forces and Education 

School Plant Planning 

Supervision I 

Seminar in Administration: 

Supervision and Curriculum 

Methods of Research 

Measurement and Evaluation I 

Dynamics of Group Process 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling 

Administration and Supervision of 

Guidance Programs 

Corneille and Racine 

Contemporary Spanish Theater 

Techniques and Applications of Statistics . . . 
Mathematics Materials for the Teacher of 

Mathematics 

Teaching Music K-6 

(Also meets Thursday) 

The Literature of the Orchestra 

Ethnopsychology 



2 General Social Psychology 
2 Developmental Psychology 



Staff G-208 

Dr. Earley G-206 

Staff A-IOl 

Staff G-II2 

Mrs. Sergent G-l 15 

Staff M-015 

Staff G-316 

Mr. Ramsdell B-004 

Staff G-307 

Staff F-104 

Dr. Morse M-013 

Staff C-317 

Dr. Freeman C-3 I 6 

Staff F-104 

Miss Gibson S-102 

Dr. Cordasco C-l I 7 

Mrs. Bredemeier . . . G-2 I 5 

Dr. Merlo S-102 

Dr. Bellagamba .... G-l 10 
Dr. Peckham and 

Mr. Salt G-l 12 

Dr. Heiss G-l 18 

Dr. Lang H-003 

Dr. Gorman G-l 13 

Dr. Gregg G-206 

Dr. Gelfond G-2 1 6 

Dr. Glick G-209 

Dr. Barbeito G-2 14 

Dr. Haft V-I6I 

Dr. Maletsky V-154 

Staff M-013 

Staff M-015 

Dr. Floyd and 

Dr. Quintana C-l II 

Mr. Gologor G-314 

Dr. Hauer G-3IS 



126 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor 



Bids. & Rm. 



Tuesday 5:00 P.M. (Continued) 



238 


73 


A525 


165 


81 


A5I4 


169 


82 


A52I 


174 


84 


A406 


338 


90 


A4I0 


250 


91 


A538 



252 92 A54I 



255 


93 


A502 


268 


94 


A530 


315 


96 


A572 


322 


97 


A584 



Tuesday 6:30 P.M. 

201 12 AlOl 



206 1 2 A406 



130 20 AI05 



134 20 AI06 



38 20 A364 



117 21 AlOO 



087 


24 


AlOO 


209 


26 


AlOl 


215 


28 


Alio 


220 


28 


A34I 


153 


46 


A 1 00 A 



160 49 AIOOA 



162 63 AI90 



279 65 A270 



17! 80 Alio 



251 92 AI02 



254 93 A305 



259 94 AI03 2 



262 94 



312 96 



AI22 
A206 



History and Foundations of Health . . 
Biology and the Problems of Society . 
(Alternate weeks all year) 
Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry . . . . 
(Also meets Thursday) 
Invertebrate Palentology (Lecture) . 
(Also meets Thursday 7:00-10:00 Lab) 
The Newspaper in the Classroom . . . . 
Ethnopsychology 



Foundations of Contemporary Economic 

Thought 

Advanced Cultural Geography 

Nationalism in Modern India 

Selected Problems in Sociology 

Cleft Palate and Oral Deformities . . . . 



Principles of Business Management 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Advertising 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Contemporary Poetry: Auden to Present . . . 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to the Visual Arts 

The Family: An Interdisciplinary Approach 
(Also meets Thursday) 

Foundations of Design 

Machine Woodwork , 

Beginning Spanish I 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Beginning Italian I 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to Religion , 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Psychology in Business and Industry 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Descriptive Astronomy 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Principles of Economics: Micro 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Geography of East and Southeast Asia ... 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Development of Early Western Civilization , 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Nineteenth Century Europe, I8I5-I9I4 ... 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Individual and Society , 

(Also meets Thursday) 



Dr. Hoi+sma . P-005 

Mrs. Kane F-209 

Dr. Lynde F-204 

Mr. Ramsdell B-004 

Mr. Michelli G-317 

Dr. Quintana and 

Dr. Floyd . .' C-l II 

Dr. Kronish G-2 I 7 

Dr. Sternberg C-304 

Dr. More G-2 1 2 

Dr. Kim V-163 

Mr. Caracciolo .... K-129 

Staff C-307 

Staff C-310 

Staff G-207 

Staff G-208 

Dr. Barschi G-II5 

Staff A-IOI 

Mr. deLeeuw ...... L-229 

Mrs. Graef G-312 

Staff F-219 

Staff F-II8 

Staff G-309 

Mr. Battista G-308 

Mr. Streetman .... G-316 

Mr. Badin . ." F-1071 

Dr. Kowalski V-2S9 

Staff F-106, 

Staff S-IOI 

Mr. Bell G-307 ' 

Staff F-IOE , 

Staff B-002 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 



1 27 



Course No. 



Sec. No. Course Title 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Tuesday 7:30 P.M. 

194 10 ABO I 

140 20 A5IIA 

145 20 A539 

119 21 A502 

091 24 A4I0 

096 24 A53IA, 

B, C or D 

213 26 A530 

231 29 A47I 

002 3 1 A400 

006 31 A423 

008 3 1 A440 

012 31 A532 

023 32 A560 

028 33 A5I3 

044 34 A578 

050 35 A66I 

052 36 A45I 

061 36 A582 

071 36 A680 

075 37 A509 

085 38 A540 

187 50 A540 

280 65 A5I0 

291 65 A560 

295 65 A56I 

300 65 A565 

302 65 A567 

237 73 ASI6 

242 76 A575 

166 81 A530X 

170 82 A548 



175 


84 


A5I7 


266 


94 


A5I7 


272 


95 


A408 


317 


96 


A579 


323 


97 


A585 


Mday ( 


J:00 P.M. 


203 


12 


A20I 


205 


12 


A3 10 


208 


12 


A423 


131 


20 


AI05 



Principles and Problenns of Business Education 

Literary Criticism to 1800 

Theater and Society 

Theater Management 

Selected Masterpieces of World Art ........ 

Ceramics: Pottery and Sculpture 

Management of Family Resources 

Vocational-Technical In-Service Supervised 

Teaching Seminar — Meets all year 

2 Teacher, School and Society 

Teaching in the Urban Schools 

Curriculum and Methods in Sex Education .... 

Middle School Curriculum and Organization . . 

Comparative Studies of Educational Systems . . 

2 Secondary School Administration 

I Testing and Evaluation 

Group Development Laboratory I 

1 Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 

2 Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information 

The Student Personnel Services Team 

The Teaching of Communication Skills 

1 Television Production Seminar 

Probability 

Research Methods in Psychology 

2 Advanced Educational Psychology 

3 Developmental Psychology 

I Psychology and Education of Socially and 

Emotionally Handicapped Children 

Abnormal Psychology 

Community and Environmental Aspects of 

Health 

Philosophical and Sociological Foundations 

of Physical Education 

Animal Behavior 

Chemical Kinetics 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Geophysics 

Age of Franklin D. Roosevelt 

The Development of Political Thought to Hegel 

1 Community Resources and Youth 

Stuttering 

2 Accounting I — Financial 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Personnel Management 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Buying for Distribution 

(Also meets Thursday) 

4 Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Thursday) 



Dr. Nanassy C-316 

Dr. Hanson G-209 

Dr. Earley G-l 12 

Mr. Stoll A-102 

Staff L-135 

Staff L-129 

Mrs. Alcaro F-104 

Mr. VanBenschoten C-320 

Staff H-004 

Mr. Millard G-109 

Dr. Runden G-l 10 

Mr. Cuff G-215 

Mr. Bernstein G-216 

Dr. Bellagamba ... G-l I I 

Dr. Gelfond G-217 

Dr. Gorman G-l 13 

Mrs. Gaeng E-OOl 

Dr. Kenyon G-II8 

Dr. Davis H-003 

Mr. Donaruma ... C-l II 

Staff C-I2I. 

C-l 29 

Dr. Haft V-I6I 

Dr. Cicerone E-013 

Miss Herman G-314 

Dr. Hauer G-315 

Dr. Kraemer G-3 I 7 

Dr. Brower S-102 

Staff G-l 15 

Dr. Wacker P-005 

Mrs. Gona F-210 

Dr. Gallopo F-204 

Dr. Thiruvathukal . . V-262 

Mr. Kops G-206 

Mr. Menake G-214 

Staff G-306 

Dr. Shulman . .' K-129 

Staff C-318 

Staff C-307 

Staff C-310 

Staff G-207 



154 


46 


A200A 


161 


49 


A200A 


179 


50 


Alio 


275 


65 


AlOO 



128 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor BIdg. & Rm. 

Tuesday 8:00 P.M. (Continued) 

1 36 20 A260 My+h and Literature Mrs. Frignoca .... G-208 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Intermediate Spanish I Staff G-309 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Intermediate Italian I Staff G-308 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to Algebra and Analysis Staff F-105 

(Also meets Thursday) | 

General Psychology . Dr. Cicerone G-3 1 6i 

(Also meets Thursday) ! 

278 65 A20I Child Psychology Staff F-107 

(Also meets Thursday) 
248 91 A200 Cultural Anthropology Dr. Maloney F-106, 

(Also meets Thursday) 
257 94 AlOO The Study of American History Staff S-IOI;i 

(Also meets Thursday) 
261 94 AIM 2 Selected Topics in American History to 1 876 . Staff G-307IJ 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Wednesday 4:00 P.M. 

330 26 407 Consumer Action Miss Guthrie K-23 1 

(Also meets Monday and Friday) 
336 30 404 Organization and Administration of a 

School Library Miss Gibson S-IOJ 

(Also meets Monday and Friday) 

Wednesday 5:00 P.M. 

Principles of Vocational Education Dr. Hecht C-3I( 

Advanced Oral Interpretation Dr. Fox A- 10' 

Seminar in Art Staff L-20' 

Program Planning in Early Childhood Education Mrs. Silver ........ F-IO" 

Research Seminar in Industrial Arts Dr. Earl V-25' 

( Meets alternate weeks all year) ' 

335 30 403 Reading Materials for Children and Youth .. . Miss Gibson S-IO 

(Also meets Monday, Tuesday and Friday) 

004 31 A4I4 Supervised Teaching Seminar Venturini, 

Michelli and 

Staff H-Au 

Principles of Curriculum Development Mr. Salt G-l I 

Existentialism in Education Dr. Haas G-21 

School Law Dr. Merlo S-IO 

Theoretical Constructs In Social Group 

Interaction Mr. Tetens G-l I 

Medical Problems in Education Dr. Williams G-l I 

Techniques of Interviewing and Counseling . . . Mr. Mills G-2C 

Research Seminar in Reading Mr. Brunner C-IC 

Spanish-American Theater to 1910 Staff G-21 

Introduction to Computer Science Dr. Orfinger V-U 

Systems Programming Mr. Gugel V-IE 

Problems and Materials of Choral Music Staff . M-OI 

Developmental Psychology Staff G-31 

Research Seminar in Science Dr. Becker F-2( 

(Meets alternate weeks all year) 

Human Variation Mrs. Tatkon C-l I 

The American Revolution, 1763-1787 Dr. Royer G-2( 

Modern Political Analysis Mr. Utete G-3( 



198 


II 


A452 


124 


21 


A565 


100 


24 


A603 


210 


26 


A435 


229 


28 


A603 



010 


3! 


A530 


019 


32 


A523 


029 


33 


A52I 


049 


35 


A568 


054 


36 


A560 


066 


36 


A588 


074 


37 


A505 


158 


46 


A550 


183 


50 


A46IX 


191 


50 


A58I 


112 


60 


A520B 


296 


65 


A56I 


168 


80 


A505 


249 


91 


A53I 


265 


94 


A5I2 


273 


95 


A502 



Jl 



Wednesday 6:30 P.M. 


202 12 


A20I 


207 12 


A408 


128 20 


AI05 


132 20 


AI06 



088 


24 


AlOO 


217 


28 


A270 


222 


28 


A36I 


178 


50 


AI05 



276 


65 


172 


80 


253 


93 



I 






SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 129 
Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor Bidg. & Rm. 



Accounting I — Financial Staff C-3 I 8 

(Also nneets Monday) 

Finance Managennent Staff C-316 

(Also nneets Monday) 

Composition and Literature I Staff G-l 10 

(Also meets Monday) 

Composition and Literature II Staff G-208 

(Also meets Monday) 
35 20 A246 Renaissance Literature Dr. McGee G-l 12 

(Also meets Monday) 
16 2! AlOO I Fundamentals of Speech Staff A-IOI 

(Also meets Monday) 

Introduction to the Visual Arts Staff L-229 

Electricity Fundamentals Staff F-225 

Machine Metal Technology Staff F-l 19 

Elements of Statistical Reasoning Staff F-l 05 

(Also meets Monday) 
274 65 AlOO I General Psychology Staff G-206 

(Also meets Monday) 
Al 01 I Human Growth and Development Staff G-3 1 6 

(Also meets Monday) 
A4I 8 Three Centuries of Science Progress Mr. Minor V-265 

(Also meets Monday) 
AlOO Principles of Geography Mr. Ballwanz C-304 

(Also meets Monday) 
258 94 AI03 I Development of Early Western Civilization . 

(Also meets Monday) 
263 94 Al 32 Development of Chinese Civilization 

(Also meets Monday) 
269 95 A200 Introduction to Political Science 

(Also meets Monday) 

'ednesday 7:30 P.M. 

193 10 A434 Introduction to Business Data Processing Mr. Stein C-307 

200 II A454 Principles and Methods of Teaching 

Distributive Education and Coordination Dr. Hecht C-3 10 

139 20 A5I0 Wordsworth and Coleridge Dr. Schwegel G-214 

094 24 A5 1 I A, Painting Staff L-227 

B, CorD 

098 24 A552A, Woodcut Printing Staff L-028 

B. C or D 

226 28 A50I Curriculum Construction and Course 

Organization in Industrial Education Dr. Rosser V-259 

230 29 A4I4 Principles and Philosophy of Vocational- 
Technical Education Mr. VanBenschoten C-320 

005 3 1 A420 Instructional Innovations Dr. Pines hl-004 

009 31 A5I6 Strategies for Educational Change Mr. Michelli G-109 

013 31 A533 I Curriculum Construction In the 

Secondary School Mr. Salt G-l I I 

015 31 A640 Workshop in Education: 

Psychology-Sex Education Dr. Runden G-2 1 7 

Education In Latin America Mr. Bernstein G-2 1 6 

Methods of Research Staff S-102 

Dynamics of Group Process Staff G-l 13 

Social Case Work Dr. Williams G-II8 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling Mr. Mills . G-207 



Mr. Macaluso . . 


. . G-307 


Mr. Shapiro . . . . 


... F- 1 04 


Staff 


. .. F-106 



024 


32 


A564 




039 


34 


A503 


3 


047 


35 


A564 


2 


055 


36 


A562 




058 


36 


A580 


3 



1 30 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Wednesday 7:30 P.M. (Continued) 



063 
067 
082 

150 
186 
III 
281 

284 
292 
298 
301 

305 
307 
235 
244 
271 
314 



36 
36 
38 

41 
50 
60 
65 

65 
65 
65 
65 

65 
65 
73 
76 
95 
96 



A585 
A650 
A400 

A505 
A535 
A5I9 
A520 

A549 
A560 
A563 
A565 

A575 
A580 
A4I3 
A579 
A404 
A565 



Wednesday 8:00 P.M. 

204 12 A30I 



129 
133 
137 



20 
20 
20 



I 18 21 



148 41 



149 41 



102 



277 



173 



260 



264 



60 
65 
84 
94 
94 



AI05 

AI06 

A274 

AI50 

A 1 00 A 

A200A 

AlOO 

AlOl 

AlOl 

AIM 

A323 



Thursday 4:00 P.M. 

334 30 200 
078 37 A5I3 



113 60 A53 1 



Group Guidance and Counseling Activities 

Research Senninar and Thesis Writing 

Selection and Utilization of 

Audiovisual Materials 

History of the French Language 

Linear Algebra I 

The Kodaly System in Music Education . . . . 
Proseminar I 



Psychology and Adult Learner 

Advanced Educational Psychology 

Theories of Learning 

Psychology and Education of Socially and 
Emotionally Handicapped Children . . . . 

Projective Techniques I 

Personality 

The Drug Abuse Problem 

Advanced Tests and Measurements . 
Governments and Politics of South Asia 
Sociology of Youth 



Staff G-209 

Dr. Davis H-003 

Staff C-I2I 

Mr. Hinshalwood . . G-312 

Mr. Westphal V-154 

Staff M-013 

Miss Garcia and 

Dr. Kraemer E-013 

Staff E-012 

Dr. Seidman G-308 

Dr. Haupt G-315 



Dr. Sugarman . . 


. .. G-314 


Dr. Seymour . . . 


. . . E-OOl 


Dr. Brown 


. . . G-309' 


Dr. Hoitsma . . . 


... F-105 


Dr. Tews 


... P-005 


Dr. Johnson . . . 


... V-I6I 


Dr. Thomas .... 


. .. G-212 


Staff 


. .. C-318 


Staff 


. .. G-IIO 


Staff 


G-208 


Dr. Earley 


. . . G-206 



Accounting III — Intermediate 

(Also meets Monday) 

Composition and Literature I Staff 

(Also meets Monday) 

Composition and Literature II Staff 

(Also meets Monday) 

Modern Drama: Ibsen to O'Neill 

(Also meets Monday) 

Art and History of Radio and Television Staff A-IOI 

(Also meets Monday) 

Beginning French I Staff G-l \i 

(Also meets Monday) 

Intermediate French I Mrs. Sergent G-l IE 

(Also meets Monday) 

Introduction to Music Staff M-Oli 

(Also meets Monday) 

Human Growth and Development Staff G-3N' 

(Also meets Monday) 

Principles of Geology Mr. Ramsdell B-OO' 

(Also meets Monday) [ 

Selected Topics in American History to 1876 Staff G-301 

(Also meets Monday) 

History of Russia to 1917 Staff F-IO< 

(Also meets Monday) 



Introduction to School Library Service Miss Gibson S-IOl 

Corrective and Remedial Reading, Part I . . 



Ensemble: Chorus I . 
(Also meets Tuesday) 



Miss Schantz . . . 


... C-107 




C-109 




C-lll 




C-ll 


Dr. Morse 


... M-oi; 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 



1 31 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



Bldg. & Rm. 



Thursday 5:00 P.M. 

197 10 A603 Seminar in Business Education 

211 26 A5I0 Interdisciplinary Study of the Fannily 

017 32 A445 Puerto Rican Children in Mainland Schools 
032 33 A540 2 Supervision I 

068 36 A654 I Field Work and Practicum In Guidance 

and Counseling 

069 36 A654 2 Field Work and Practicunn In Guidance 

and Counseling 

Field Work and Practicum in Social Work . . 
Curriculum for Environmental Education . . . 

Sarmlento and His Times 

Real Variables I 

Curriculum Construction in Mathematics . . 

Teaching Music K-6 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Urban Psychology 

Research Seminar in Health Education . . . . 

Theoretical Inorganic Chemistry 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

History of Soviet Institutions 

Social Change 

Orientation and Observation in 

Special Education 

Principles of Business Management 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Advertising 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Contemporary Poetry: Auden to Present . . . 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Fundamentals of Speech 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

The Family: An Interdisciplinary Approach 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Foundations of Industry — Power 

Plastics Molding and Forming III 

Jewelry Making and Lapidary 

Beginning Spanish I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Beginning Italian I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Introduction to Religion 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Psychology In Business and Industry 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Descriptive Astronomy 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
25! 92 AI02 Principles of Economics: Micro 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
254 93 A305 Geography of East and Southeast Asia 

(Also meets Tuesday) 



070 


36 


A655 


080 


37 


A555 


157 


46 


A540 


184 


50 


A52I 


189 


50 


A57I 


lis 


60 


320 


289 


65 


A553 


240 


73 


A603 


169 


82 


A52I 


1 ^^^ 


94 


A525 


313 


96 


A562 


324 


97 


A620 


liursday 6:30 P.M. 


201 


12 


AlOl 


206 


12 


A406 


130 


20 


AI05 


134 


20 


A 106 


138 


20 


A364 


1 17 


21 


AlOO 


209 


26 


AlO! 


1 218 


28 


A280 


i 221 


28 


A353 


J 224 


28 


A490 


1 '" 


46 


AIOOA 


' 1 ' ^° 


49 


AIOOA 


'1 ' 62 


63 


A 190 



279 65 A270 



171 80 Alio 



Dr. Nanassy C-316 

Miss Guthrie ...... F-104 

Dr. Cordasco H-003 

Mr. Cuff G-IIO 

Staff G-215 

Dr. Gregg G-l 12 

Dr. Williams G-216 

Staff G-209 

Dr. Rivera G-214 

Dr. Chai V-16! 

Mr. Lacatena V-163 

Staff M-013 

Dr. Williams G-314 

Dr. Hoitsma P-005 

Dr. Lynde F-204 

Staff G-217 

Dr. Thomas G-306 

Dr. Heiss K-129 

Staff C-307 

Staff C-310 

Staff G-207 

Staff G-208 

Dr. Barschi G-II5 

Staff A-IOI 

Mrs. Graef G-312 

Staff F-II9 

Staff F-223 

Mr. Endres F- II 8 

Staff G-309 

Mr. Battlsta G-308 

Mr. Streetman .... G-316 

Mr. Badin F-107 

Dr. KowalskI V-259 

Staff F-106 

Staff S-IOI 



132 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 
Course No. Sec. No. Course Title 

Thursday 6:30 P.M. (Continued) 

259 94 AI03 2 Development of Early Western Civilization . . 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
262 94 AI22 Nineteenth Century Europe, I8I5-I9I4 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
312 96 A206 Individual and Society 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Thursday 7:00 P.M. 

174 84 A406 Invertebrate Palentology (Lab) 

(Also meets Tuesday 5:00-6:30 Lecture) 

Thursday 7:30 P.M. 

192 10 A402 Principles and Methods of 

Teaching Accounting 

196 10 A530 Business Education in Post 

High School Institutions 

144 20 A536 Modern American Poetry 

146 20 A603 English Research Writing 

090 24 A406A, Photography: A Contemporary 

B, CorD Art Form 1. II, III or IV 

212 26 A520 Dynamics of Family Interaction 

007 31 A43I The Junior High School Curriculum 

020 32 A525 Ethical Problems of Educational Practice 

022 32 A540 2 Social Forces and Education 

026 33 A5I0 2 Educational Administration I 

033 33 A553 Administration and Supervision of Adult 

Continuing Education 

040 34 A503 4 Methods of Research 

048 35 A565 Consultation in Organizational Development . . 

051 35 A662 Group Development Laboratory II 

053 36 A45I 2 Guidance for the Classroom Teacher 

064 36 A586 Elementary School Guidance Services 

077 37 A5II Case Studies of Reading Difficulties, Part I . . . 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Mr. Bell G-307 

Staff F-105 

Staff B-002 

Mr. Ramsdell B-004 

Staff C-316 

Staff C-317 

Dr. Healey ........ G-IIO 

Mr. Pettegrove .... G-217 

Staff L-I3I 

Dr. Rappaport F-104' 

Mr. Cuff G-109 

Staff G-314 

Mrs. Bredemeier . . . G-215 
Dr. Lindemann .... G-l 1 1^ 

112 
306 
113, 
116, 
004 
\\i 
I07'l 

109: 
ii;! 



staff G- 

Dr. Heiss G- 

Dr. Gorman ....... G- 

Dr. Gregg G- 

Mrs. Gaeng H- 

Dr. Gelfond G- 

Mrs. Ward C- 

C- 
C- 



084 38 A520 

086 38 A540 

188 50 A554 

285 65 A550 

299 65 A564 

303 65 A573 

308 65 A660 

236 73 A4I4 

245 76 A603 

1 70 82 A548 

270 95 A402 

318 96 A579 

321 97 A581A 

Thursday 8:00 P.M. 

203 12 A20I 



2 Production of Audiovisual Instructional 

Materials: Part I Non-Projected Material . 
2 Television Production Seminar 

Projective Geometry 

Quantitative and Statistical Methods 

Psychology and Education of Physically and 

Mentally Handicapped Children 

Physiological Psychology 

Seminar in Educational Psychology 

Workshop in Venereal Disease Education . 

Research Seminar in Physical Education . . . 

Chemical Kinetics 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Governments and Politics of Africa 

2 Community Resources and Youth 

Diagnosis and Correction of Children with 

Learning Disabilities I 

2 Accounting I — Financial 

(Also meets Tuesday) 



Mr. Ruezinsky C-12 

Mr. Diglio C-12' 

Mr. Stevens V-16 

Dr. Rotter E-OOl 

Dr. Duryea G-31 

Miss Garcia G-31 

Dr. Brower E-OI 

Staff G-21 

Dr. Schleede P-00 

Dr. Gallopo F-2C 



Mr. Utete 
Staff 



G-2C 
G-21 



Dr. Heiss K-li 



Staff 



C-3 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES-FALL SEMESTER 



1 33 



Course No. Sec. No. Course Title 

Thursday 8:00 P.M. (Confinued) 

205 12 A3I0 Personnel Management 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
208 1 2 A423 Buying tor Distribution 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
1 3 1 20 Al 05 4 Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
1 35 20 A260 Myth and Literature 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
1 54 46 A200A Intermediate Spanish I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
161 49 A200A Intermediate Italian I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
179 50 Al 10 Introduction to Algebra and Analysis 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
275 65 AlOO 2 General Psychology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
278 65 A20I Child Psychology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
248 91 A200 Cultural Anthropology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
I 257 94 AlOO The Study of American History 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
261 94 Al I I 2 Selected Topics in American History to 1876 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Friday 4:00 P.M. 

330 26 407 Consumer Action 

(Also meets Monday and Wednesday) 
336 30 404 Organization and Administration of a 

School Library 

(Also meets Monday and Wednesday) 

day 5:00 P.M. 

■ 335 30 403 Reading Materials for Children and Youth 

■ (Also meets Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday] 

laturday 8:30 A.M. 

045 34 A578 2 Testing and Evaluation 
^iB|| 164 81 A46I Limnology 

M 167 81 A570 Ecology 

♦urday 10:30 A.M. 

141 20 A5I2 The History of the English Language 

041 34 A503 5 Methods of Research 

V 256 90 A603 Reading Seminar in History and the 

SB Social Sciences 

1 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Staff C-307 

Staff C-310 

Staff G-207 

Mrs. Frignoca G-208 

Staff G-309 

Staff G-308 

Staff F-105 

Dr. Cicerone G-316 

Staff F-107 

Dr. Maloney F-106 

Staff S-IOI 

Staff G-307 

Miss Guthrie K-231 

Miss Gibson S-102 

Miss Gibson S-102 

Staff S-102 

Mr. McCormick .... V-353 
Dr. Shubeck V-359 

Mr. Reaske G-208 

Staff S-102 

Staff C-307 



134 COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 

COURSE REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1971 

Use the information below for completing the registration form. Refer toi 
course descriptions and full titles under Course Offerings, beginning oni 
page 37. Building codes may be found on page 35. 

"P" in the last column denotes a prerequisite for the course which mayij 
be found following the course description. 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
Curriculum and Instruction 



001 31 A400 

002 3 1 A400 

003 31 A4I0 

004 31 A4I4 

005 31 A4I5 

006 3 1 A420 

007 31 A423 

008 3 1 A440 
092 31 A45 1 

009 31 A5I6 

010 31 A530 
ON 31 A530 

012 31 A53I 

013 31 A532 

014 31 A533 

015 31 A533 

016 31 A635 

017 31 A640 



Tchr,School&Soc 3 

Tchr,School&Soc 3 

FieldExperEduc 1-3 

SupvTchgSem 6 

SupvS+udTchgSem 2 



Ins+rlnnovations 

TchgUrbanSchools . . . 
Curr&MethSexEd . . . . 
TchgStra+DevCri+ical 
ThinkingrPart II ...".. 

Stra+EdChange 

PrinCurrDev 

PrinCurrDev 

CurrCons+rElemSch 
MidSchoolCurr&Organ 
CurrConstrSecSch . . . 
CurrCons+rSecSch . . . 
ResSemlnCurrCons+r 
WkspEd:Psy-SexEd ... 



Staff Mon 

Staff Tues 

Dr. Walter Mon 

Staff Wed 

Venturini, 
Micfielll&Staff ..Wed 

Dr. Pines Wed 

Mr. Millard . . . .Tues 
Dr. Runden .... Tues 



Staff 

Mr. Michelli 
Mr. Salt . .. 

Staff 

Dr. McElroy 



Mon 

Wed 

Sat 

Mon 

Thurs 



Mr. Cuff Wed 

Mr. Salt Wed 

Dr. McElroy .... Thurs 

Mr. Salt Sat 

Dr. Runden Wed 



7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 
5:00-6.40 
5:00-7:30 

5:00-6:40 
7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 
7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-9:10 

8:30-10:10 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

10:30-12:10 

7:30-9:10 



H-004 
H-004 
H-008 
G-l 10 

H-Aud 
H-004 
G-l 09 
G-IIO 

V-154 
G-l 09 
G-l 09 
G-215 
G-215 
G-l 09 
G-215 
G-215 
G-l 09 
G-IIO 



Educational Foundations and Comparative Studies 

018 32 A445 PuertoRicanChildMain .. 3 Dr. Cordasco ... Thurs 

019 32 A440 SocFoundEduc 3 Dr. Cordasco ... Tues 

020 32 A52I I ContemEducThot 3 Dr. Haas Mon 

021 32 A52I 2 ContemEducThot 3 Dr. Haas Wed 

022 32 A540 I SocForcesEd 3 Mrs. Bredemeier Tues 

023 32 A540 2 SocForcesEd 3 Mrs. Bredemeier Thurs 

024 32 A544 SocClass&Ed 3 Mrs. Danzig .... Mon 

025 32 A545 PolitForces&Ed 3 Mr. Bernstein ... Mon 

026 32 A560 CompStudEdSys 3 Mr. Bernstein ... Thurs 

027 32 A56I EduclnWesternEurope .. 3 Dr. Hamel Tues 

Educational Leadership 

028 33 A5I0 I EducAdmin I 3 Dr. Mosier Wed 

029 33 A5I0 2 EducAdmin I 3 Dr. Lindemann .. Thurs 

030 33 A5I3 I SecSchAdmin 3 Dr. Bellagamba . Tues 

031 33 A5I3 2 SecSchAdmin 3 Dr. Peckham . . . Mon 



5:00-7:30 
5:00-7:30 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 



5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 



C-320 
C-320 
G-l 09 
G-l I I 
G-l 09 
G-l 09 
G-IIO 
G-l 09 
G-l 09 
G-l II 



H-004 
H-004 
G-II2 
G-l 1 1 



COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 



1 35 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Bids. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



Educational Leadership (Continued) 



032 33 


A526 




033 33 


A540 


1 


034 33 


A540 


2 


035 33 


A54I 




036 33 


A550 




D37 33 


A6I9 




)38 33 


A620 




)39 33 


A622 




)40 33 


A628 




41 34 


A503 


1 


42 34 


A503 


2 


43 34 


A503 


3 


44 34 


A503 


4 


45 34 


A503 


5 


46 34 


A504 




47 34 


A508 




48 34 


A578 


1 


49 34 


A578 


2 


50 34 


A603 




M 35 


A564 


1 


\1 35 


A564 


2 


13 35 


A565 




4 35 


A568 




5 35 


A66I 




6 35 


A662 
















8 36 


A45I 


1 


A45I 


2 


9 36 


A562 




36 


A565 




1 36 

2 36 

3 36 

■ ' 36 


A570 




A579 




A580 


1 


A580 


2 


A580 


3 


A58I 




A582 


1 


A582 


2 


' ' 36 


A583 




^^ \ It 


A585 


1 


A585 


2 


j? 36 


A589 




[ 36 


A650 




Z 36 


A654 


1 


A654 


2 


^36 


A655 




A670 





SchBusAdmin 3 

Supervision I 3 

Supervision I 3 

Supervision II 3 

Hist&PhilDevAdult- 

ContEduc 3 

SemlnAdnnin:Supv&Curr 2 



Dr. Merlo Mon 

Mr. Cuff Mon 

Dr. Bellagamba . Tues 
Mr. Cuff Thurs 



5:00-6:40 


S-102 


P 


7:30-9:10 


G-IIO 


P 


5:00-6:40 


G-IIO 


P 


5:00-6:40 


G-l 10 


P 



SysAnalylnEduc 

SchoolFinance 

FIdExplnAdmin&Supv 



Mr. Ast ... 

Mr. Salt & 

Dr. Peckhann . . . Sat 

Dr. Merlo Thurs 

Dr. Merlo Tues 

Dr. Peckhann . . . . To be 



Thurs 5:00-6:40 



8:30 

5:00 

7:30- 

arrang 



Educational Research and Evaluation 

MethOfResearch 3 Dr. Lang 



MethOfResearch . . . 
MethOfResearch . . . 
MethOfResearch ... 
MethOfResearch . . . 
ActResearchTeachers 
Measnnnt&Eval II . . . . 

Test&Eval 

Test&Eval 

SennlnResearch 



Staff . . . . 
Dr. Heiss 
Staff . . . . 
Staff .... 
Staff . . . . 



Human Organizational Processes 

DynannicsSroupProc .... 3 Staff 

DynamicsGroupProc .... 3 Staff 

ConsullnOrganDev 3 Dr. Gorman . . 

TheoConstrlnSocGrplnter 3 Mr. Tetens . . . 

GrpDevLab I 3 Dr. Gregg . . . 

GroDevLab II 3 Dr. Gornnan . . 



Personnel Services 



GuidClrmTchr 

GuidClrmTchr 

SocCaseWork 

RoleSchSocWorker 

CounselingAdults 

UseTestslnCouns 

PrinGuid&Couns 

PrinGuid&Couns 

PrinGuid&Couns 

CommResourGuid 

VocGuid&OccInf 

VocGuid&OccInf 

EdGuidance 

GrGuid&CounAct 

GrGuid&CounAct 

StudPersServlnHIEd . . . . 
ResSenn&ThesisWrit . . . . 
FIdWrk&PracGuid&Coun 
FIdWrk&PracGuid&Coun 
FIdWrk&PractSocWrk . . . 
TechOfEval .■ 



Mrs. Gaeng 
Mrs. Gaeng 



Dr. 
Dr. 
Mr 
Dr. 
Mr. 
Dr. 



Williams 

Williams 
, Mills . . 

Gelfond 
Mills . . 

Kenyon 

Staff 

Mr. Millard 
Dr. Kenyon . 

Staff 

Dr. Gregg . 
Mr. Millard 

Staff 

Dr. Davis . . 
Dr. Davis . . 
Dr. Gelfond 
Dr. Gregg . 
Dr. Williams 
Dr. Gelfond 



Mon 

Tues 

Wed 

Thurs 

Sat 

Mon 



Dr. Lang Tues 

Staff 

Staff 



Mon 
Sat 



Dr. Heiss Tu( 



Mon 
Thurs 
Thurs 
Wed 
Wed 
Thurs 



Mon 

Wed 

Mon 

Mon 

Mon 

Thurs 

Mon 

Tue 

Wed 

Mon 

Tues 

Wed 

Thurs 

Mon 

Thurs 

Tues 

Wed 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Thurs 

Wed 



10:10 

6:40 

9:10 

3d 



5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

10:30-12:10 

7:30-9:10 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

8:30-10:10 

5:00-6:40 



7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 



5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
7:30-9:10 
7:30-9:10 



7:30-9: 

5:00-6: 

7:30-9: 

7:30-9: 

5:00-6: 

5:00-6: 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 



10 
:40 
10 
10 
:40 
:40 



G-ll I 

G-IIO 
S-102 
S-102 



H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
H-003 
G-l II 
H-003 
H-004 



G-! 13 
G-l 13 
G-II2 
G-l I I 
G-l 12 
G-l 12 



y-004 

E-OOl 

G-l 12 

I 12 

216 

216 

216 

216 

216 

217 

216 

G-216 

G-217 

G-217 

E-OOl 

E-OOl 

H-003 

G-216 

G-217 

G-306 

G-l 12 



136 COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



078 37 A50I 

079 37 A502 

080 37 A504 

081 37 A506 



082 37 A5I0 

083 37 ASK 



084 37 A55I 

085 37 A560 



Special Ins+ruc+ional Areas 

TechQ-fReadlmprov 2 Staff Tues 

InSecSch 

Adm&SupvOfReaclProg . 2 Mrs. Ward Tues 

ReadNeedsAdultLearner 3 Staff Wed 

ReadingResources 3 Miss Schantz . . .Thurs 



FldExperRead 

Corr&RemReadPart II 



ConservEduc 

Pra ct In Environ Ed uc 



2 Staff To be arranged 

3 Miss Schantz . . .Thurs 



3 Staff 
3 Staff 



Tues 
Thurs 



5:00-6:40 


C-lll 




7:30-9:10 


C-lll 




5:00-6:40 


C-109 




7:30-9:10 


C-107, 
C-109, 
C-lll 




ranged 




P 


4:00-6:40 


C-107, 
C-109, 
C-lll, 
C-II7 


F 


5:00-6:40 


G-l 12 




7:30-9:10 


G-215 


P 



Technology in Education 



086 38 A400 

087 38 A400 

088 38 A52I 

089 38 A52I 

090 38 A54I 

091 38 A54I 



1 Selec&UtilAudioMat 

2 Selec&UtllAudioMat 

1 ProdAudiolnstrMat: 
Part II ProjMat 

2 ProdAudiolnstrMat: 
Part II ProjMat 

1 TVProgSem 

2 TVProgSem 



3 Staff Mon 7:30-10:00 

3 Staff Wed 7:30-10:00 

3 Mr. Ruezinsky ..Mon 5:00-6:40 



3 Mr. Ruezinsky . . Tues 



7:30-9:10 



3 Staff Mon 7:30-9:10 

3 Mr. Diglio Thurs 7:30-9:10 



C-I2I 
C-I2I 
C-I2I P 

C-I2I P 

C-129 
C-I2I, 
C-129 



093 


24 


A 100 1 


094 


24 


AlOO 2 


095 


24 


A302 


096 


24 


A408 


097 


24 


A4I2 


098 


24 


A4I9A 
or B 


099 


24 


A5IIA, 




B,C 


or D 


100 


24 


A52IA, 




B, C 


or D 


101 


24 


A53IA, 




B, C 


or D 


102 


24 


A543A, 




B, C 


or D 


103 


24 


A553A, 




B, C 


.or D 


104 


24 


A590 


105 


57 


A400 



SCHOOL OF FINE AND PERFORMING ARTS 

Fine Arts 

IntroVisualArts 3 Mr. deLeeuw . . . Tues 

IntroVisualArts 3 Staff Wed 

FoundMethlnArtEduc . . . 2 Staff Mon 

Multi-Media 2 Staff Thurs 

ArtOfl9thCentury 3 Staff Tues 

LifeDraw I or II 2 Mr. Czerkowicz . Mon 

Painting 2 Staff Wed 

Sculpture 2 Mr. deLeeuw . . . Mon 

Ceramics:Pot&Sculp .... 2 Staff Tues 

DecOfFabrics 2 Staff Wed 

Lithography 2 Mr. Vernacchia . Wed 

ModPhilOfArt 3 Mr. Silver Mon 

HistCinemaArt 3 Staff Thurs 



6:30-10:00 


L-229 




6:30-10:00 


L-229 




5:00-6:40 


L-108 


P 


5:00-7:00 


L-134 


P 


7:30-10:00 


L-108 




7:30-10:00 


L-225 




7:30-10:00 


L-227 




7:30-10:00 


L-126 




7:30-10:00 


L-129 


P 


7:30-10:00 


L-223 




7:30-10:00 


L-228 




7:30-10:00 


L-209 


P 


7:30-10:00 


L-135 


P 



COURSE SCH EDU LES- SPR I N G SEMESTER 



1 37 



Mas. 
No. 



Dept. 



Course 
No. 



Sect. 
No. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



Pre- 
req. 



108 


60 


A406 


109 


60 


A500 


1 10 


60 


A50I 


1 1 1 


60 


A502 


1 12 


60 


A503A 
and B 


113 


60 


A504 


1 14 


60 


A505 


115 


60 


A506 


116 


60 


A507 


117 


60 


A508 


118 


60 


A5I0A 
and B 


119 


60 


A5I2 


120 


60 


A52IB 


121 


60 


A525 


122 


60 


A532 


123 


60 


A533 


124 


60 


A540 


125 


60 


A600 



ModernMusic 

IndStudylnMusIc 

PrivateStudylnConnp I 
PrivateStudylnConnp II 
ApplMus I and II: 
Primlnstr 

ApplMus ilhPrimlnstr 
ApplMus IV:Prinnlnstr 
ApplMus V: Prinnlnstr . 
ApplMus VhPrimlnstr 
ApplMus VlhPrimlnstr 
ApplMus:Seclnstr 



Music 

. 3 Staff M&W 6:30-7:45 

3 or 4 Staff To be Arranged 

3 Staff To be Arranged 

3 Staff To be Arranged 

2 ea. Staff To be Arranged 



M-013 



6 
6 
4 
4 
4 
2 ea 



Theo&AuralSkillslnMus II 3 

ClrnnMeth:Brass 2 

EthnolApproachMusic . . 3 

EnsbhChor II 2 

OperaWorkshop 2 

MastCllnMusPerf: 2 
ItallanVocLIt 

IndStudylnMusIc 4 



Staff To be Arranged 

Staff To be Arranged 

Staff To be Arranged 

Staff To be Arranged 

Staff To be Arranged 

Staff To be Arranged 

Mr. Girt Mon 7:30-10:00 

Staff Wed 5:00-6:40 

Staff Tues. 7:30-10:00 

Dr. Morse Tu&Th 4:00-4:50 

Dr. Sacher Tues 7:00-10:00 

Staff Mon 5:00-6:40 



M-OI I 
M-019 
M-OI I 
M-013 
M-015 
M-015 



Staff 



To be Arranged 



Speech and Theater 



128 


21 


A 100 1 


129 


21 


AlOO 2 


130 


21 


A204 


131 


21 


A440 


132 


21 


A500 


133 


21 


A50I 


134 


21 


A552 


135 


21 


A553 


136 


21 


A554 



FundamentalsSpeech 
FundannentalsSpeech 
FundPubSpeaking . . 
ThetrHist:ClassEliza 
IndependentStudy 
SurvResearchMeth 
InternlnDramProd .. 
InternlnOralComm . 
Intern In Red io&TVCoi 



3 Staff M&W 6:30-7:45 A-IOI 

3 Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 A-IOI 

3 Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 A-IOI 

2 Staff Tues 5:00-6:40 A-102 

3 Sraff To be Arranged P 

3 Staff Mon 5:00-6:40 A-102 P 

3 Staff To be Arranged P 

3 Staff To be Arranged P 

3 Staff To be Arranged P 



SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 



English 



39 


20 


AI05 


1 


40 


20 


AI05 


2 


141 


20 


A 105 


3 


42 


20 


A 105 


4 


43 


20 


A 106 


1 


44 


20 


A 106 


2 


45 


20 


A 106 


3 


46 


20 


A 106 


4 


47 


20 


A 160 




48 


20 


A334 




49 


20 


A346 




50 


20 


A375 




70 


20 


A485 




51 


20 


A50I 




l52 


20 


A502 




53 


20 


A506 





Comp&LIterature I 3 

Comp&Literature I 3 

Comp&Literature I 3 

Comp&Literature I 3 

Comp&Literature II ... . 3 

Comp&Literature II .... 3 

Comp&Literature II . . . 3 

Comp&Literature II .... 3 

ArtOfPoetry 3 

American Drama 3 

1 9CenEngRomanticLit .. 3 

Film&Society 3 

TchgEngSecSch 3 

Anglo-Saxon 3 

Victorian Poets 3 

John Milton 3 



Staff M&W 6:30-7:45 

Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 

Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 

Staff Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 

Staff M&W 6:30-7:45 

Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 

Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 

Staff Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 

Mr. Rich M&W 6:30-7:45 

Dr. Earley M&W 8:00-9:15 

Dr. McGee .... Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 

Mr. Price Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 

Staff Wed 7:30-10:00 

Dr. Petty Thurs 7:30-10:00 

Dr. Radner Mon 7:30-10:00 

Mr. Pettegrove. . Wed 7:30-10:00 



-206 
-206 
-206 
-206 
-207 
■207 
■207 
-207 
-208 
G-208 
G-208 
G-l 13 
G-314 
G-306 
G-209 
G-209 



138 COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 

S.H. instructor Day 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



BIdg. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



English (Con+inued) 



154 20 A5IIB 

155 20 A5I8 

156 20 A520 

157 20 A529 

158 20 A544A 

159 20 A555 

1 60 20 A603 



LitCritFroml800-Pres . 
Byron, Shelly, Keats . . . . 
Sem In British Writers: 

D.H.Lawrence 

Ennerson, Thoreau, 

Whitman 

Shakespeare:Trageclies 
Ibsen.Strindberg&Shaw 
EngResearchWriting . . 



3 Dr. Hanson . . . Sat 10:30-1:00 

3 Dr. Schwegel . . .Thurs 7:30-10:00 

3 Dr. Mickelson ..Wed 7:30-10:00 

3 Dr. Healey Tues 7:30-10:00 

3 Dr. Earley Tues 7:30-10:00 

3 Dr. Jacobs Mon 7:30-10:00 

3 Mr. Roberts Mon 7:30-10:00 



G-209 
G-209 

G-306 

G-209 
G-215 
G-314 
G-306 



French 



161 41 AIOOB 

162 41 A200B 

163 41 A5I3 

164 41 A532 

165 41 A543 



166 46 AIOOB 

167 46 A200B 

168 46 A505 
I 69 46 A5 1 6 

170 46 A543 

171 46 A546 

172 46 A603 

173 49 AIOOB 

174 49 A200B 



Beginning French II . . 

InternnFrench II 

MedievalTheater 

FrenchNovel I 8th Cent 
ContemporaryPoets . . 



Staff 

Mrs. Sergent 
Dr. Szklarczyk 
Mrs. Sergent 
Staff 



Spanish and Italian 



BeginSpanlsh II 3 

IntermSpanish II 3 

HIstSpanishLang 3 

SurveyMedvlSpanLit . . 3 

Span-AmerThetr20thCent 3 

SennlnModernismo 3 

SpanResearchSem 3 

Beginltalian II 3 

Intermltalian II 3 



M&W 

M&W 

Tues 

Thurs 

Mon 



Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Mon 

Dr. Barbeito . . . Tues 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Rivera Thurs 

Staff 

Mr. Battista 



8:00-9:15 
8:00-9:15 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 



6:30-7:45 
8:00-9:15 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
5:00-6:40 
To be Arranged 
Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 



Staff Tu&Th 8:00-9:15 



G-307 
G-308 
G-l II 
G-209 
G-209 



G-309 
G-309 
G-309 
G-306 
G-309 
G-308 

G-307 
G-307 



176 63 AlOO 

177 63 A475 



Philosophy and Religion 



IntroToPhilosophy 
OrlentalReligions 



Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 

Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 



G-309 
G-314 



179 81 A4I0 

180 81 A550X 



181 82 AlOO 

182 82 A53I 

183 82 A544 



SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCES 
Biology 



BlolScienceDennon 2 

TopicslnMicrobiology . . 3 



Dr. Kuhnen . . , 
Dr. Koditschek 



Thurs 5:00-6:40 
Tues 7:30-10:00 



Chennis+ry 



IntroChemlstry 3 

AdvTheoretOrganicChenn 3 
Electrochennistry 3 



Mr. Zabady .... M&W 6:30-7:45 

Mr. Flynn Tu&Th 5:00-6:15 

Dr. Ewart Tu&Th 7:30-8:45 



Physics/Geoscience 



F-210 
V-351 



V-258 
F-204 
F-206 



185 


80 


A40I 


TchgSciencelnSecSch . . 


3 


Mrs. Fllas . . . . 


. . Thurs 


7:30-10:00 


V-265 


186 


80 


A422 


ConsumerScIence 


3 


Dr. S. KowalskI 


..Tu&Th 


6:30-7:45 


V-259 


187 


84 


AlOO 


FundOfGeoscIence .... 


3 


Mr. Kelland . . 


..Tu&Th 


8:00-9:15 


V-258 


188 


84 


A506 


AdvlnverebratePaieont 


4 


Mr. Ramsdell . 


. . Tues 
Thurs 


7:00-9:00 
7:00-10:00 


B-004 
B-004 



COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 139 



Dept. 
No. 



CourM Sect. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



Pre- 
req. 



192 50 AlOl 

193 50 AIM 



50 A426X 

50 A43IX 

50 A450X 

50 A470X 

50 A522 

50 A536 

50 A537 

50 A546 

50 A568 

50 A572 

50 A575 

50 A583 



05 



08 


10 


A300 


09 


10 


A404X 


10 


10 


A409 


1) 


10 


A435 


12 


10 


A503 


13 


10 


A5I3 


14 


10 


A603 



5 II A4I9 

6 I I A553 
17 II A554 



12 


A202 


12 


A202 


12 


A208 


12 


A302 


12 


A4I7 


12 


A4I7 


12 


A42I 


12 


A457 



25 



7 26 A430 

8 26 A5II 
!9 26 A53I 
)0 26 A550 

I 26 A603 



Mathematics 



IntroModMath 3 Staff 

Math RelateclSoc& Manage 

Sciences 1 3 

AdvCalculus II 2 

FoundModAlgebra 2 

FoundOfGeometry 2 

TchgOfMath 2 

RealVariables II 3 

LlnearAlgebra II 3 

MathLogic 3 

Non-ParannatrlcStatistics 3 

ApplMath I 3 

TchgGenMath 3 

SelecToplnMath 3 

TheoryDigitalMachines 3 



Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 



Staff M&W 

Mr. Zipse . . 
Dr. Stewart 
Mr. Nettler 

Staff 

Dr. Chai Thu 

Mr. Westphal 
Mr. Bredlau . 
Mr. Devlin . . 
Dr. Parzynski 
Dr. Sobel . . . 
Mr. Garfunkel 
Mr. Mutter . . 



SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Business Education 

BusinessMath 2 Staff Tues 5:00-6:40 

Prin&MethTchgTypewritg 2 Miss Uzzolino . . . Mon 7:30-9:10 

ConsumerEconomics . 3 Staff Tues 7:30-10:00 

UnitRecordEquipment .. 3 Mr. Stein Wed 7:30-10:00 

IntroResearchlnBusEd ... 3 Dr. Nanassy . . . . Thurs 5:00-6:40 

ImprlnstrlnSteno&SecPrac 3 Staff Tues 5:00-6:40 

SemlnBusEduc 3 Dr. Nanassy .. Tues 7:30-9:10 

Distributive Education 



Merchandiselnfornnation 2 
Prin&ProbOfAdultExten . 3 
WksplnProbOfDistrEd 3 



Staff Tu&Th 6:30-7:20 

Dr. Hecht Wed 5:00-6:40 

Dr. Hecht Wed 7:30-9:10 



Business Administration 



Accountg II — Managerial 3 

Accountg II — Managerial 3 

Salesmanship 3 

Accountg IV — Interm ... 3 

MarketlngManagement 3 

MarketingManagennent 3 

PrinOflnvestnnents 3 

SalesManagement 3 

Ho 

CreatExperlnEarlyChild 3 

ContennplssueslnHomeEco 2 

HousingFamily 2 

NewFindgslnNutrition . . 2 

ResearchSeminar 3 



Staff M&W 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Wed 

Staff Tu&Th 

conomics 

Staff Wed 

Staff Tues 

Mrs. Mukherjee .Thurs 

Mrs. Kelly Thurs 

Dr. Ruslink Tues 



30-7:45 

00-9:15 

00-9:15 

00-9:15 

30-7:45 

00-9:15 

30-10:00 

00-9:15 



F-105 



M&W 


8:00-9:15 


F-105 




Mon 


5:00-6:40 


V-I6I 


P 


Wed 


5:00-6:40 


V-16! 


P 


Tues 


5:00-6:40 


V-I6I 


P 


Mon 


7:30-9:10 


V-163 


P 


Thurs 


5:00-6:40 


V-I6I 




Wed 


7:30-9:10 


V-154 




Mon 


5:00-6:40 


V-163 


P 


Tues 


7:30-9:10 


V-I6I 


P 


Thurs 


7:30-9:10 


V-I6I 


P 


Tues 


5:00-6:40 


V-154 




Thurs 


5:00-6:40 


V-154 


P 


Mon 


7:30-9:10 


V-I6I 


P 



C-315 


P 


C-317 


P 


C-317 


P 


C-317 


P 


C-316 


P 


C-317 


P 


C-316 


P 



C-310 
C-310 
C-310 



C-316 
C-318 
C-310 
C-316 
C-318 
C-318 
C-307 
C-320 



5:00-7:30 


F-105 


P 


5:00-6:40 


F-107 




7:30-9:10 


F-107 




5:00-6:40 


F-107 


P 


7:30-9:10 


F-107 


P 



140 COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 
Title S.H. Instructor Day 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect. 
No. No. No. No. 



Time 



BIdg. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



Industrial Education and Technology 



235 


28 


AI30 


FoundOf Indus — Graph 












ArtsComm 




Staff 


236 


28 


AI40 


FoundOf Industry — Wood 




Staff 


237 


28 


A250 


FoundOf Industry — Plastics 




Staff 


238 


28 


A260 


FoundOf! ndustry — Metals 




Staff 


239 


28 


A33I 


LetterpressRepro 




Staff 


240 


28 


A37I 


ElectronlcsFunda 




Staff 


241 


28 


A38I 


IndustrialPower 




Staff 


242 


28 


A404A, 
B, C 


IndepStudlnlndustry . . . 


-3 


Staff 


243 


28 


A4II 


Designlnlndustry 




Staff 


244 


28 


A490 


JewelryMak&Lapidary . . 




Staff 


245 


28 


A492 


ManufacturlngTechnology 




Staff 


246 


28 


A502 


ShopPlan&EquIpSelecIn 












IndustrialEducation .... 




Dr. F 


247 


28 


A507 


Prin&PhllOfVoc-TechEd . 




Staff 


248 


28 


A60IA, 
B. C 


IndepStudinlndusArts . . 




Staff 



Mon 


6:30-10:00 


F-II7 




Tues 


6:30-10:00 


F-M8 




Thurs 


6:30-10:00 


F-223 




Wed 


6:30-10:00 


F-II9 




Tues 


6:30-10:00 


F-II7 


P 


Wed 


6:30-10:00 


F-225 


P 


Thurs 


6:30-10:00 


F-II9 


p 


To be 


Arranged 




P 


Tues 


6:30-10:00 


F-219 




Thurs 


6:30-10:00 


F-II8 




Mon 


6:30-10:00 


F-II8 


P 


Wed 


7:30-9:10 


F-106 




Mon 


7:30-9:10 


F-106 




To be 


Arranged 




P 



249 29 A42 1 



Vocational Education 

CurrConstrlnVoc-TechEd 3 Mr. V'Benschoten Tues 



5:00-7:30 



C-307 



Health and Physical Education 



253 


73 


A4I3 


254 


73 


A50I 


255 


73 


A502 


256 


73 


A508 


257 


73 


A526 


258 


73 


A528 


259 


76 


A552 


260 


76 


A553 


261 


76 


A556 


262 


76 


A576 



DrugAbuseProblenn .... 2 

SchoolSafety 3 

Safety:Man&HisEnviron 3 

AdvDriverSafety 3 

CurrDIvlnHealthEd .... 3 

EvallnHealth 3 

SennlnCurrProblnMen'sAth 3 

SemlnCurrProblnWom'sAt 3 

PsyOfPhysActivity 3 

CurrDevlnPhysEd 3 



Dr. hloitsma . 

Staff 

Dr. Hoitsnna . 
Dr. Coder . . 

Staff 

Mr. Shahrokh 

Staff 

Staff 

Dr. Toth . . . . 
Dr. Wacker . 



Tues 

Mon 

Wed 

Mon 

Tues 

Thurs 

Wed 

Wed 

Mon 

Tues 



5:00-6:40 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

6:30-10:00 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 

7:30-9:10 



P-005 
C-307 
P-005 
C-II7 
G-306 
C-307 
C-320 
F-107 
P-005 
P-005 



SCHOOL OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 
Anthropology 

265 91 A20I PhysAnthropology 3 Mrs. Tatkon . . . . Tu&Th 6:30-7:45 F-106 

266 9! A533 SpanCultlnU.S.Today . . . 3 Staff Mon 7:30-9:10 C-320 

267 9! A536 Ethnology II 3 Dr. Quintana . . , Tues 7:30-10:00 C-II7 



269 92 A203 

270 92 A544 



EcononnicStatistics 
Govern&Business . 



Econonnics 

. 3 Staff M&W 6:30-7:45 G-307 

3 Dr. Kronish Tues 5:00-6:40 G-209 



272 93 A200 

273 93 A4I0 

274 93 A4I3 

275 93 A42I 



CulturalGeography 
UrbanGeography . 

MiddleEast 

PopProbOfWorld . 



Geography 

. . 3 Staff Tu&Th 

. . 3 Staff Tu&Th 

. . 3 Mr. Boucher .... Mon 

3 Mr. Ballwanz . . .Wed 



6:30-7:45 


C-304 




8:00-9:15 


C-304 




7:30-10:00 


C-304 


P 


7:30-10:00 


C-304 


P 



I 



COURSE SCHEDU LES- SPR I N G SEMESTER 



1 41 



Mas. 



Dept. Course 
No. No. 



Sect. 
No. 



Title 



S.H. Instructor 



Day 



Time 



BIdg. 
Rm. 



Pre- 
req. 



History 



276 90 A4I0 

277 90 A40I 

278 90 A603 

279 94 A 1 02 

280 94 Alio 

281 94 Alio 

282 94 AII2 

283 94 AII2 

284 94 AI2I 

285 94 AI23 

286 94 A2I4 

287 94 A423 

288 94 A430 

289 94 A5I3 

290 94 A5I9 

291 94 A537 

292 94 A60I 



295 95 A200 

296 95 A403 

297 95 A409 

298 95 A55I 



100 


65 


A 100 


1 


iOl 


65 


AlOO 


2 


102 


65 


AlOl 


1 


103 


65 


AlOl 


2 


04 


65 


A200 


1 


05 


65 


A200 


2 


06 


65 


A5I0 




^07 


65 


A52I 




08 


65 


A540 




09 


65 


A545 




10 


65 


A550 




1 1 


65 


A553 


1 


12 


65 


A553 


2 


13 


65 


A554 




14 


65 


A555 




15 


65 


A560 


1 


16 


65 


A560 


2 


17 


65 


A560 


3 


18 


65 


A56I 


1 


19 


65 


A56I 


2 


>0 


65 


A56I 


3 


l\ 


65 


A562 




n 


65 


A563 


1 


P 


65 


A563 


2 


r 


65 


A564 




h 


65 


A565 


1 



NewspaperlnCIrm 2 

TchgSocStudlnSecSch . . 3 

ReadSemlnHist&SocSci . 2 

StudNon-WestHist 3 

DevOfAmerClvil 3 

DevOfAmerCivil 3 

SelTopicslnAmerHist 

Sincel876 3 

SelTopicslnAmerHist 

Sincel876 3 

EriyModEurope, 1350-1815 3 

ContempEurope, 1914-Pres 3 

DipHistOfU.S 3 

HistOfRussiaSincel9l7 . 3 

ModJapaneseHist 3 

ProbNewNation, 1789-1828 3 

U.S.InNuclearAge 3 

l9CentEuroplntellecHist 3 

NewlnterlnHist 3 



Mr. Grieco 

Staff 

Staff 

Mr. Shapiro 

Staff 

Staff 



Thurs 

Sat 

Sat 

M&W 

Tu&Th 

Tu&Th 



5:00-6:40 

8:30-1 I :00 

10:30-12:10 

6:30-7:45 

6:30-7:45 

8:00-9:15 



Staff M&W 8:00-9:15 



Staff Tu&Th 

Mr. Macaluso . . M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Mr^. Bell Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Mr. Olenik Thurs 

Dr. Royer Wed 

Mr. Kops Tues 

Dr. Zimmer .... Mon 
Staff Tues 



Political Science 



IntroPollSci 3 

Govern&PoliFarEast .... 3 

ModPoliThot 3 

ConstiLaw 3 



Staff M&W 

Mr. Utete Thurs 

Mr. Menake ... Tues 
Dr. Balfe Wed 



Psychology 



GenPsych 3 

GenPsych 3 

hHumGrowth&Develop . . 3 

HumGrowth&Develop . . 3 

EducatlonalPsych 3 

EducationalPsych 3 



ResrchMethlnPsych 

Proseminar II 

RemedBasicSkills . . 



3 
3 
3 

Sem:EmtDistrChild 3 

Quant&StatMeth 3 

UrbanPsych 3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



UrbanPsych 

PsychOfBus&lndus ... 
PsychAspectsOf Poverty 
AdvEducPsych 
AdvEducPsych 



AdvEducPsych 3 

DevelopmentalPsych ... 3 

DevelopmentalPsych ... 3 

DevelopnnentalPsych ... 3 

DynamOfHumBehavIor . 3 

TheoriesOfLearning ... 3 

TheoriesOf Learning .... 3 

Psych&EdPhys&MntHdpCh 3 

Psych&EdSoc&MntHdpChn 3 



Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff Tu&Th 

Staff M&W 

Dr. Draper Tues 

Miss Garcia . . Wed 
Mrs. Litovsky . . . Mon 

Dr. Duryea Thurs 

Dr. Rotter Thurs 

Dr. Koppel Tues 

Dr. Williams . . .Thurs 

Dr. Draper Mon 

Dr. Williams . . Wed 
Miss Herman . . . Tues 
Dr. Seidman .... Wed 

Staff Thurs 

Staff Mon 

Dr. Floyd Tues 

Staff Thurs 

Staff Thurs 

Staff Mon 

Dr. Haupt Wed 

Dr. Duryea Thurs 

Dr. Worms Tues 



6:30 
8:00 
8:00 
6:30 
8:00 
6:30 
7:30 
7:30 
7:30 
5:00 
7:30 
5:00 
5:00 
7:30 
5:00 
7:30 
7:30 
7:30 
5:00 
5:00 
5:00 
7:30 
7:30 
7:30 
7:30 
7:30 



7:45 

9:15 

9:15 

7:45 

9:15 

7:45 

10:00 

10:00 

10:00 

6:40 

10:00 

6:40 

6:40 

10:00 

6:40 

10:00 

10:00 

10:00 

6:40 

6:40 

6:40 

9:10 

10:00 

10:00 

10:00 

10:00 



308 
307 
310 
I 15 
I 15 
I 15 



G-l 15 



8:00-9:15 


G-l 18 




6:30-7:45 


G-II8 




6:30-7:45 


G-315 




6:30-7:45 


G-l 18 




8:00-9:15 


G-II8 


P 


7:30-10:00 


G-308 




5:00-6:40 


G-314 




7:30-9:10 


G-217 




7:30-9:10 


G-312 


P 


5:00-6:40 


G-215 


P 



6:30-7:45 


G-315 




7:30-10:00 


G-IIO 




7:30-10:00 


F-104 




5:00-6:40 


G-209 


P 



G-316 

G-316 

G-316 

G-317 

G-317 

G-316 

E-013 

E-013 

E-013 

E-013 

F-104 

F-104 

F-104 

E-OOl 

E-013 

G-308 

G-217 

E-OOl 

F-104 

E-OOl 

C-307 

C-l 17 

F-104 

E-OOl 

E-013 

G-214 



142 COURSE SCHEDULES-SPRING SEMESTER 

S.H. Instructor Day 



Mas. Dept. Course Sect 
No. No. No. No. 



Title 



Time 



BIdg. Pre- 
Rm. req. 



Psychology (Continued] 



326 


65 


A565 2 


327 


65 


A566 


328 


65 


A567 


329 


65 


A568 


330 


65 


A573 


331 


65 


A576 


332 


65 


A578 1 


333 


65 


A578 2 


334 


65 


A58I 


335 


65 


A582 


336 


65 


A590 


337 


65 


A592 


338 


65 


A593 


339 


65 


A660 


340 


65 


A66I 


341 


65 


A662 


342 


65 


A665 


343 


65 


A67I 



Psych&EdSoc&MntHdpChn 3 

Psych&EdGif+ed 3 

AbnormalPsych 3 

PsychGrpDynamics 3 

PhysiologicalPsych 3 

ProjTech II 

PsychTests&Meas .... 
PsychTes+s&Meas .... 



3 
3 
3 

Motivation 3 

BehaviorModification ... 3 

DiagCaseStudies 3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



SpecDiagTech 

Ciinicallnterviewing . . . 

SemlnEducPsych 

PractlnSchPsych 

SchPsychJgtExternship 
PractTchgEmtDistrChn II 
Thesis II 



Mrs. Litovsky . . .Wed 
Dr. Shapiro .... Mon 

Dr. Brower Tues 

Staff Thurs 

Miss Garcia .... Tues 
Dr. Seymour . . . Wed 
Dr. Seidman . . . Mon 
Dr. Shapiro .... Thurs 
Dr. Cicerone . . . Tues 

Dr. Haupt Mon 

Dr. Seymour . . . Thurs 

Staff Wed 

Dr. Brower Wed 

Dr. Friedman . . . Mon 

Dr. Hauer To be 

Or Shapiro .... To be 

Staff To be 

Dr. Hauer To be 



7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

5:00-6:40 

7:30-10:00 

5:00-6:40 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 



F-104 

G-214 
S-IOI 

G-l I I 
L-209 

G-312 
S-IOI 
S-IOI 
V-154 
S-102 

H-004 
E-012 
S-IOI 
E-012 



Sociology 



346 96 A 1 00 

347 96 A559 

348 96 A560 

349 96 A563 

350 96 A564 

351 96 A566 

352 96 A579 



SociologlcalPerspective . 3 

SociologyDeviance 3 

SociologicalTheory 3 

Self&Society 3 

SocIalPlanning 3 

MetropolitanCommunity 3 

CommResources&Youth . 3 



Staff 


..Tu&Th 


8:00-9:15 


G-314 


Dr. Thomas . . 


. . Mon 


7:30-9:10 


G-317 


Dr. McGuire . 


. . Tues 


7:30-9:10 


V-163 


Dr. Chasin . . . 


. . Tues 


5:00-6:40 


G-217 


Dr. Alloway . . 


. . Mon 


5:00-6:40 


F-105 


Dr. Kim 


..Wed 


7:30-9:10 


G-214 


Staff 


. . Thurs 


7:30-9:10 


G-214 



Communication Sciences and Disorders 



354 97 A57I 

355 97 A58IB 

356 97 A583 

357 97 A586 

358 97 A592 

359 97 A593 

360 97 A595 

361 97 A596 



MethTchg Deaf 8(H earl mp 
Diag&CorrChiidLrng 

Disabilities II 3 

LangDisordersChild .... 3 

EducOfHandicapped ... 3 

SemResrchSpeechPath . . 2 

SemResrchAudiology ... 2 
SemResrchTchgDeaf& 

Hearinglmpaired 2 

SemResrchLrngDisabil 2 



3 Staff Tues 



Staff Thurs 

Mrs. Leahy Mon 

Staff Thurs 

Dr. Leight Tues 

Dr. Leight Tues 

Dr. Leight Tues 

Dr. Heiss Tues 



5:00-6:40 



K-129 



7:30-9:10 


K-129 


5:00-6:40 


K-129 


5:00-6:40 


K-129 


7:30-9:10 


K-129 


7:30-9:10 


K-129 


7:30-9:10 


K-129 


7:30-9:10 


K-230 



Library Science 

363 30 301 Refer&Blblio I 2 Miss Gibson . . . M&W 4:00-5:40 S-102 

(Meets January 31-March 20) 

364 30 302 Refer&Bibilo II 2 Miss Gibson ...M&W 4:00-5:40 S-102 

(Meets March 22-May 17) 

365 30 303 Class&Cataloging 3 Miss Gibson ...Tu&Th 4:00-5:15 S-102 



SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 143 

DAILY SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1^72 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor BIdg. & Rm. 

Monday 4:00 P.M. 

363 30 301 Reference and Bibliography I Miss Gibson S-102 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

364 30 302 Reference and Bibliography II Miss Gibson S-102 

(Also meets Wednesday) 



Monday 5:00 P.M. 



Survey of Research Methods Staff A- 1 02 

Foundations of Method in Art Education Staff L-108 

Field Experiences in Education Dr. Walters H-008 

Contemporary Educational Thought Dr. Haas G-109 

Social Class and Education Mrs. Danzig G-l 10 

Secondary School Administration Dr. Peckham G-l I I 

School Business Administration Dr. Merlo S-102 

Methods of Research Dr. Lang H-003 

Guidance for the Classroom Teacher Mrs. Gaeng H-004 

Role of the School Social Worker Dr. Williams G-II2 

Counseling Adults Mr. Mills G-216 

Community Resources for Guidance Mr. Millard G-217 

Production of Audiovisual Instructional 

Materials: Part II Projected Materials Mr. Ruezinsky C- 1 2 I 

The Contemporary Poets Staff G-209 

History of the Spanish Language Staff G-309 

Advanced Calculus II Mr. Zipse V-I6I 

Mathematical Logic Mr. Bredlau V-163 

Master Class in Musical Performance: 

Italian Vocal Literature Staff M-015 

Developmental Psychology Staff F- 1 04 

Seminar in Educational Psychology Dr. Friedman E-012 

Social Planning Dr. Alloway F- 1 05 

Language Disorders of Children Mrs. Leahy K-129 



Accounting II — Managerial 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Art of Poetry 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Fundamentals of Speech Staff . A-IOI 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
Foundations of Industry — 

Graphic Arts Communication 

Manufacturing Technology ... 

Modern Music 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

305 65 A200 2 Educational Psychology Sta« .G-316 

(Also meets Wednesday) 



133 


21 


A50I 


095 


24 


A302 


003 


31 


A4I0 


020 


32 


A52I 1 


024 


32 


A544 


031 


33 


A5I3 2 


032 


33 


A526 


041 


34 


A503 1 


057 


36 


A45I 1 


060 


36 


A565 


061 


36 


A570 


066 


36 


A58I 


088 


38 


A52I 1 


165 


41 


A543 


168 


46 


A505 


194 


50 


A426X 


200 


50 


A537 


124 


60 


A540 


318 


65 


A56I 1 


339 


65 


A660 


350 


96 


A564 


356 


97 


A583 


onday 6:30 P.M. 


218 


12 


A202 1 


139 


20 


AI05 1 


143 


20 


A 106 1 


147 


20 


A 160 


128 


21 


A 100 1 


235 


28 


AI30 


245 


28 


A492 


108 


60 


A406 



Staff 


... C-316 


Staff 


. G-206 


Staf:^ 


G-207 


Mr. Rich 


. G 208 



Staff 


F-II7 


Staff .... 


F-l 18 


Staff 


M-013 



144 SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



Bids;. & Rm. 



Monday 5:00 P.M. 



256 
181 



A508 
AlOO 



269 92 A203 



279 94 A 1 02 



284 94 AI2 



295 95 A200 



Monday 7:30 P.M. 


209 


10 


A404X 


152 


20 


A502 


159 


20 


A555 


160 


20 


A603 


098 


24 


A4I9A 
or B 


100 


24 


A52IA 




B, CorD 


104 


24 


A590 


247 


28 


A507 


001 


31 


A400 


092 


31 


A45I 


ON 


31 


A530 


025 


32 


A545 


033 


33 


A540 


046 


34 


A504 


048 


34 


A578 


051 


35 


A564 


059 


36 


A562 


063 


36 


A580 


070 


36 


A585 


086 


38 


A400 


090 


38 


A54I 


197 


50 


A470X 


205 


50 


A583 


119 


60 


A5I2 


308 


65 


A540 


313 


65 


A554 


322 


65 


A563 


327 


65 


A566 


332 


65 


A578 


335 


65 


A582 


254 


73 


A50I 


261 


76 


A556 


266 


91 


A533 


274 


93 


A4I3 


291 


94 


A537 


347 


96 


A559 



Continued) 

Advanced Driver Safety . 
Introductory Chemistry . 
(Also nneets Wednesday) 

Econonnic Statistics 

(Also nneets Wednesday) 
The Study of Non-Western 
(Also nneets Wednesday) 
Early Modern Europe, 1350-1815 
(Also nneets Wednesday) 
Introduction to Political Science 
(Also nneets Wednesday) 



Principles and Methods of Teaching 

Typewriting 

Victorian Poets 

Ibsen, Strindberg and Shaw 

English Research Writing 

Life Drawing I or II 



Dr. Coder C-l 17 

Mr. Zabady V-258 



Staff 

History Mr. Shapiro . . 

Mr. Macaluso 



G-307 
G-II5 
G-II8 



Sculpture 



Modern Philosophies of Art 

Principles and Philosophy of Vocational- 
Technical Education 

Teacher, School and Society 

Teaching Strategies to Develop Critical 

Thinking Part II 

Principles of Curriculunn Developnnent 

Political Forces and Education 

Supervision I 

Action Research for Teachers 

Testing and Evaluation 

Dynannics of Group Processes 

Social Case Work 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling 

Group Guidance and Counseling Activities . . 
Selection and Utilization of Audiovisual 

Materials 

Television Progrannnning Senninar 

Teaching of Mathematics 

Theory of Digital Machines 

Theoretical and Aural Skills in Music II 

Remediation of Basic Skills 

The Psychology of Business and Industry 

Theories of Learning 

Psychology and Education of the Gifted 

Psychological Tests and Measurements 

Behavior Modification 

School Safety ' 

The Psychology of Physical Activity 

Spanish Culture in the U.S. Today 

The Middle East 

19th Century European Intellectual History .. 
Sociology of Deviance 



Staff G-3IS 



Miss Uzzolino C-317 

Dr. Radner G-209 

Dr. Jacobs G-314 

Mr. Roberts G-306 

Mr. Czerkowicz .... L-225 

Mr. deLeeuw L-126 

Mr. Silver L-209 

Staff F-106 

Staff H-004 



Staff G-215 

Mr. Bernstein G-109 

Mr. Cuff G-IIO 

Staff H-003 

Staff G-lll 

Staff G-II3I 

Dr. Williams G-II2 

Mr. Mills G-216 

Mr. Millard G-217 

Staff C-I2I 

Staff C-I29| 

Staff ..' V-163! 

Mr. Mutter V-I6I 

Mr. Girt M-OII 

Mrs. Litovsky E-013 

Dr. Draper E-OOl ; 

Staff F-104 

Dr. Shapiro G-214 

Dr. Seidman S-IOI 

Dr. Haupt S-102 



Staff 

Dr. Toth . . . 

Staff 

Mr. Boucher 
Dr. Zimmer . 
Dr. Thomas . 



C-307 
P-005 
C-320 
C-304 
G-312 
G-317 



SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 145 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Monday 8:00 P.M. 

219 12 A202 

221 12 A302 

140 20 AI05 

144 20 A 1 06 

148 20 A334 

130 21 A204 

161 41 AIOOB 

162 41 A200B 
193 50 AIM 

176 63 A 1 00 

302 65 AlOl 

282 94 AII2 

287 94 A423 

I Tuesday 4:00 P.M. 

365 30 303 

122 60 A532 

■ Tuesday 5:00 P.M. 

■ 208 10 A300 
213 10 A5I3 

131 21 A440 
228 26 A5II 
249 29 A42 1 

019 32 A440 

022 32 A540 

034 33 A540 

047 34 A508 

050 34 A603 

067 36 A582 

078 37 A50I 

084 37 A55I 

163 41 A5I3 
1 69 46 A5 I 6 
196 50 A450X 
203 50 A572 



Accounting II — Managerial Staff C-3 I 8 

(Also nneets Wednesday) 

Accounting IV — Intermediate Staff C-3 I 6 

(Also nneets Wednesday) 

Conaposition and Literature Staff G-206 

(Also nneets Wednesday) 

Composition and Literature II Staff G-207 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

American Drama Dr. Earley G-208 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking Staff A-IOl 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Beginning French II Staff G-307 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Intermediate French II Mrs. Sergent G-308 

(Also meets Wednesday) 
Mathematics Related to the Social and 

Management Sciences I Staff F-105 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Introduction to Philosophy Staff G-309 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

hluman Growth and Development Staff G-3 I 6 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

Selected Topics in American History Since 1876 Staff G-l 15 

(Also meets Wednesday) 

History of Russia Since 1917 Staff G- 1 I 8 

(Also meets Wednesday) 



Classification and Cataloging Miss Gibson S-102 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Ensemble: Chorus II Dr. Morse M-OI 3 

(Also meets Thursday) 



Business Mathematics Staff C-3 I 5 

Improvement of Instruction in Stenography 

and Secretarial Practice Staff C-3 I 7 

Theater History: Classical to Elizabethan Staff A-I02 

Contemporary Issues in Home Economics .... Staff F-107 

Curriculum Construction in Vocational- 
Technical Education Mr. VanBenschoten .C-307 

Sociological Foundations of Education Dr. Cordasco C-320 

Social Forces in Education Mrs. Bredemeier . . . G-109 

Supervision I Dr. Bellagamba .... G-! 10 

Measurement and Evaluation II Dr. Lang H-003 

Seminar in Research Dr. Heiss H-004 

Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information Dr. Kenyon G-2 I 6 

Techniques of Reading Improvement in the 

Secondary School Staff C-l I I 

Conservation Education Staff G- II 2 

Medieval Theater Dr. Szlclarczyic G-l I I 

Survey of Medieval Spanish Literature Dr. Barbeito G-306 

Foundations of Geometry Mr. Nettler V-I6I 

Teaching of General Mathematics Dr. Sobel V-l 54 



146 SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Tuesday 5:00 P.M. (Continued] 



311 
319 
253 
182 

270 
292 
349 
354 



65 
65 
73 
82 

92 
94 
96 
97 



A553 
A56I 
A4I3 
A53I 

A544 
A60i 
A563 
A57I 



Tuesday 6:30 P.M. 

215 II A4I9 

222 12 A4I7 

141 20 AI05 

145 20 AI06 

149 20 A346 

129 21 AlOO 

093 24 AlOO 

236 28 AI40 

239 28 A33I 

243 28 A4II 

166 46 AIOOB 

173 49 AIOOB 

192 50 AlOl 

177 63 A475 

300 65 AlOO 

303 65 AlOl 

1 86 80 A422 

265 91 A20I 

272 93 A200 

280 94 Alio 

285 94 AI23 

286 94 A2I4 

Tuesday 7:00 P.M. 

123 60 A533 

1 88 84 A506 



E-OOl 
P-005 
F-204 

G-209 



1 Urban Psychology Dr. Koppel F-104 

2 Developmental Psychology Dr. Floyd .... 

The Drug Abuse Problem Dr. Hoits .... 

Advanced Theoretical Organic Chemistry .... Mr. Flynn .... 
(Also meets Thursday) 

Government and Business Dr. Kronish . . . 

New Interpretations in History Staff G-215 

Self and Society Dr. Chasin G-2 1 7 

Methods of Teaching the Deaf and 

Hearing Impaired Staff K-129 



Merchandise Information Staff C-310 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Marketing Management Staff C-3 1 8 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature I Staff G-206 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature II Staff G-207 

(Also meets Thursday) 

19th Century English Romantic Literature .... Dr. McGee G-208 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Fundamentals of Speech Staff A-IOI 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to the Visual Arts Mr. d 

Foundations of Industry — Wood Staff 



Leeuw L- 

F- 



-229 
■118 

Letterpress Reproduction Staff . . . .' F-l 17 

-219 
-309 



Design in Industry Staff F 

Beginning Spanish II Staff G 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Beginning Italian II Mr. Battlsta G 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Introduction to Modern Mathematics Staff F 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Oriental Religions Staff G 

(Also meets Thursday) 

General Psychology Staff G 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Human Growth and Development Staff G 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Consumer Science Dr, S. Kowalski .... V 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Physical Anthropology Mrs, Tatkon F 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Cultural Geography Staff C 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Development of American Civilization Staff G 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Contemporary Europe, 1914 to Present Staff G- 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Diplomatic History of the United States Mr. Bell G- 

(Also meets Thursday) 



307 
105 
314 
316 
317 
259 
106- 
304 
IIS 
315 
118 



Opera Workshop Dr. Sacher M-015 

Advanced Inverebrate Paleontology Mr. Ramsdeil B-004 

(Also meets Thursday) 



SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R i N G SEMESTER 147 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor BIdg. & Rm. 

Tuesday 7:30 P.M. 

210 10 A409 Consumer Economics Staff C-317 

214 10 A603 Seminar in Business Education Dr. Nanassy C-316 

157 20 A529 Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman Dr. Healey G-209 

1 58 20 A544A Shakespeare: Tragedies Dr. Earley G-2 1 5 

097 24 A4I2 Art of the 19th Century Staff L-108 

101 24 A53IA, Ceramics: Pottery and Sclupture Staff L-129 

B. C or D 

231 26 A603 Research Seminar Dr. Ruslink F-107 

002 31 A400 2 Teacher, School and Society Staff H-004 

007 31 A423 Teaching in the Urban Schools Mr. Millard G-109 

008 3! A440 Curriculum and Methods in Sex Education ... Dr. Runden G-l 10 

027 32 A56I Education in Western Europe Dr. Hamel G-l I I 

030 33 A5I3 I Secondary School Administration Dr. Bellagamba .... G-l 12 

039 33 A622 School Finance Dr. Merlo S-102 

042 34 A503 2 Methods of Research Staff H-003 

064 36 A580 2 Principles of Guidance and Counseling Dr. Kenyon G-2 1 6 

072 36 A589 Student Personnel Services in Higher Education Dr. Davis E-OOl 

079 37 A502 Administration and Supervision of 

Reading Programs Mrs. Ward C-l I I 

089 38 A52I 2 Production of Audiovisual Instructional 

Materials: Part II Projected Materials Mr. Ruezinsky C-I2I 

Non-Paramatric Statistics Mr. Devlin V-I6I 

An Ethnological Approach to Music Staff M-OI I 

Research Methods in Psychology Dr. Draper E-0I3 

Advanced Educational Psychology Miss Herman G-308 

Psychology and Education of Socially and 

Emotionally Handicapped Children Dr. Worms G-214 

Abnormal Psychology Dr. Brower S-IOI 

Physiological Psychology Miss Garcia L-209 

Motivation Dr. Cicerone V- 1 54 

Curriculum Development in Health Education Staff G-306 

Curriculum Development in Physical Education Dr. Wacker P-005 

Topics in Microbiology Dr. Koditschek V-351 

Electrochemistry Dr. Ewart F-206 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Ethnology II Dr. Quintana C-l 17 

The United States in the Nuclear Age Mr. Kops G-217 

Modern Political Thought Mr. Menake F-104 

Sociological Theory Dr. McGuire V-163 

Seminar in Research in Speech Pathology .... Dr. Leight K-129 

Seminar in Research in Audiology Dr. Leight K-129 

Seminar in Research in Teaching the Deaf 

and Hearing Impaired Dr. Leight K-129 

361 97 A596 Seminar in Research in Learning Disabilities . . Dr. Heiss K-230 

lesday 8:00 P.M. 

220 12 A208 Salesmanship Staff C-310 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Marketing Management Staff C-318 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Sales Management Staff C-320 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature I Staff G-206 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Composition and Literature II Staff G-207 

(Also meets Thursday) 



201 


50 


A546 


121 


60 


A525 


306 


65 


A5I0 


315 


65 


A560 1 


325 


65 


A565 1 


328 


65 


A567 


330 


65 


A573 


334 


65 


A58I 


257 


73 


A526 


262 


76 


A576 


180 


81 


A550X 


183 


82 


A544 


267 


91 


A536 


290 


94 


A5I9 


297 


95 


A409 


348 


96 


A560 


358 


97 


A592 


359 


97 


A593 


360 


97 


A595 



223 


12 


A4I7 


225 


12 


A457 


142 


20 


A 105 


146 


20 


AI06 



148 SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor BIdg. & Rm. 

Tuesday 8:00 P.M. (Confinued) 

150 20 A375 Film and Society Mr. Price G-M3 

(Also meets Thursday) 
167 46 A200B Intermediate Spanish II Staff G-309 

(Also meets Thursday) 
174 49 A200B Intermediate Italian II Staff G-307 

(Also meets Thursday) 
301 65 AlOO 2 General Psychology Staff G-316 

(Also meets Thursday) 
304 65 A200 I Educational Psychology Staff G-3 1 7 

(Also meets Thursday) 
187 84 AlOO Fundamentals of Geoscience Mr. Kelland V-258 

(Also meets Thursday) 
273 93 A4I0 Urban Geography Staff C-304' 

(Also meets Thursday) 
281 94 Alio 2 Development of American Civilization Staff G-II5 

(Also meets Thursday) 
283 94 AII2 2 Selected Topics in American History since 1876 Staff G-II8' 

(Also meets Thursday) 
346 96 AlOO The Sociological Perspective Staff G-314 

(Also meets Thursday) 

Wednesday 4:00 P.M. 

363 30 301 Reference and Bibliography I Miss Gibson S-I02' 

(Also meets Monday) 

364 30 302 Reference and Bibliography II Miss Gibson S-102^ 

(Also meets Monday) 

Wednesday 5:00 P.M. 

216 II A553 Principles and Problems of Adult Extension 

Distributive Education Dr. Hecht C-310 

Creative Experiences in Early Childhood Staff F-105 

Supervised Teaching Seminar Staff G-l 10 

Supervised Student Teaching Seminar Venturini, 

Michelli and 

Staff H-Aud 

Middle School Curriculum and Organization . Mr. Cuff G-109 

Educational Administration I Dr. Mosier H-004 

Methods of Research Dr. Heiss H-OOl 

Theoretical Constructs in Social Group i 

Interaction Mr. Tetens G-l \m 

Guidance for the Classroom Teacher Mrs. Gaeng E-OOl 

Principles of Guidance and Counseling Staff G-216 

Techniques of Evaluation Dr. Gelfond G-l 12 

Reading Needs of the Adult Learner Staff C-I09 

Spanish-American Theater of the 20th Century Staff G-309 

Foundations of Modern Algebra Dr. Stewart V-I6I 

Classroom Methods: Brass Staff M-019. 

Psychological Aspects of Poverty Dr. Williams E-013 

Special Diagnostic Techniques Staff E-012 

Problems of the New Nation, I 789- 1 828 Dr. Royer G-314 

Constitutional Law Dr. Balfe G-209 

Wednesday 6:30 P.M. 

218 12 A202 I Accounting II— Managerial Staff C-316. 

(Also meets Monday) |j| 

139 20 AI05 I Composition and Literature I Staff G-206''' 

(Also meets Monday) 



227 


26 


A430 


004 


31 


A4I4 


005 


31 


A4I5 


013 


31 


A532 


028 


33 


A510 1 


043 


34 


A503 3 


054 


35 


A568 


058 


36 


A45I 2 


065 


36 


A580 3 


077 


36 


A670 


080 


37 


A504 


170 


46 


A543 


195 


50 


A43IX 


120 


60 


A52IB 


314 


65 


A555 


337 


65 


A592 


289 


94 


A5I3 


298 


95 


A55I 



d 



SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 149 
Course No. S«c. No. Course Title Instructor BIdg. & Rm. 

Wednesday 6:30 P.M. (Continued) 

143 20 AI06 I Composition and Literature II Staff G-207 

(Also meets Monday) 
147 20 A! 60 Art of Poetry Mr. Rich G-208 

(Also meets Monday) 
128 21 AlOO I Fundamentals of Speech Staff A-IOI 

(Also meets Monday) 

094 24 AlOO 2 Introduction to the Visual Arts Staff L-229 

238 28 A260 Foundations of Industry— Metals Staff F-II9 

240 28 A37I Electronics Fundamentals -. . . . Staff F-225 

108 60 A406 Modern Music Staff M-013 

(Also meets Monday) 
305 65 A200 2 Educational Psychology Staff G-316 

(Also meets Monday) 
181 82 AlOO Introductory Chemistry Mr. Zabady V-258 

(Also meets Monday) 
269 92 A203 Economic Statistics Staff G-307 

(Also meets Monday) 
279 94 AI02 The Study of Non-Western History Mr. Shapiro G-II5 

(Also meets Monday) 
284 94 AI2I Early Modern Europe, 1 350-1 81 5 Mr. Macaluso ....G-II8 

(Also meets Monday) 
295 95 A200 Introduction to Political Science Staff G-315 

(Also meets Monday) 

Wednesday 7:30 P.M. 

211 10 A435 Unit Record Equipment Mr. Stein C-317 

217 II A554 Workshop in Problems of Distributive Education Dr. Hecht C-310 

224 1 2 A42 1 Principles of Investments Staff C-307 

370 20 A485 Teaching English in the Secondary School ... . Staff G-314 

153 20 A506 John Milton Mr. Pettegrove . . . . G-209 

156 20 A520 Seminars in British Writers: D. H. Lawrence ... Dr. Mickelson G-306 

099 24 A5IIA, Painting Staff L-227 

B, Cor D 

102 24 A543A, Decoration of Fabrics Staff L-223 

B, Cor D 

103 24 A553A, Lithography Mr. Vernacchia . .. . L-228 

B, Cor D 

246 28 A502 Shop Planning and Equipment Selection in 

(Industrial Education Dr. Rosser F-106 

006 31 A420 Instructional Innovations Dr. Pines H-004 

009 31 A5I6 Strategies for Educational Change Mr. Michelli G-109 

014 31 A533 I Curriculum Construction in the 

Secondary School Mr. Salt G-2 I 5 

017 31 A640 Workshop in Education: 

Psychology-Sex Education Dr. Runden G-l 10 

021 32 A52I 2 Contemporary Educational Thought Dr. Haas G-l I I 

055 35 A66I Group Development Laboratory I Dr. Gregg G-l 12 

068 36 A582 2 Vocational Guidance and Occupational 

Information Staff G-2 I 6 

073 36 A650 Research Seminar and Thesis Writing Dr. Davis H-003 

087 38 A400 2 Selection and Utilization of Audiovisual 

Materials Staff C-I2I 

199 50 A536 Linear Algebra II Mr. Westphal V-154 

307 65 A52I Proseminar II Miss Garcia E-013 

316 65 A560 2 Advanced Educational Psychology Dr. Seidman G-2 1 7 

*' 323 65 A563 2 Theories of Learning Dr. Haupt E-OOl 

[I 



150 SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Wednesday 7:30 P.M, 

326 65 A565 

331 65 A576 

338 65 A593 

255 73 A502 

259 76 A552 

260 76 A553 

275 93 A42I 
351 96 A566 

Wednesday 8:00 P.M. 

219 12 A202 



221 


12 


A302 


140 


20 


AI05 2 


144 


20 


AI06 2 


148 


20 


A334 


130 


21 


A204 


161 


41 


AIOOB 


162 


41 


A200B 


193 


50 


AIM 


176 


63 


AlOO 


302 


65 


AlOl 1 


282 


94 


AII2 1 


287 


94 


A423 


Thursday 4:00 P.M. 


365 


30 


303 


083 


37 


A5I4 



122 60 A532 

Thursday 5:00 P.M. 

212 10 A503 
096 24 A408 
230 26 A550 
012 31 A53I 



(Continued) 

2 Psychology and Education of Socially and 

Emotionally Handicapped Children 

Projective Techniques II 

Clinical Interviewing 

Safety: Man and His Environment 

Seminar in Current Problem's in Men's 

Athletics 

Seminar in Current Problems in Women's 

Athletics 

Population Problems of the World 

The Metropolitan Community 



i 



Accounting II — Managerial 

(Also meets Monday) 

Accounting IV — Intermediate 

(Also meets Monday) 

Composition and Literature 

(Also meets Monday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Monday) 

American Drama 

(Also meets Monday) 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

(Also meets Monday) 

Beginning French II 

(Also meets Monday) 

Intermediate French II 

(Also meets Monday) 

Mathematics Related to the Social and 

Management Sciences I 

(Also meets Monday) 

Introduction to Philosophy 

(Also meets Monday) 

Human Growth and Development 

(Also meets Monday) 

Selected Topics in American History Since 1876 

(Also meets Monday) 

History of Russia Since 1917 

(Also meets Monday) 



Classification and Cataloging 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Corrective and Remedial Reading: Part II 



Ensemble: Chorus II 
(Also meets Tuesday) 



Introduction to Research in Business Education 

Multi-Media 

New Findings in Nutrition 

Curriculum Construction in the 

Elementary School 



Mrs. Litovslcy F-104 

Dr. Seymour G-312 

Dr. Brower S-IOI 

Dr. Hoitsma P-005 

Staff C-320 

Staff F-107 

Mr. Ballwanz C-304 

Dr. Kim G-214 



Staff C-318 

Staff C-316 

Staff G-206 

Staff G-207 

Dr. Earley G-20a 

Staff A-IOI 

Staff G-307 

Mrs. Sergent G-308 

Staff F-IOE 

Staff G-30<i 

Staff G-3\t 

Staff G-ll! 

Staff G-lll 

Miss Gibson S-IO! 

Miss Schantz C-IO/ 

c-io*; 
c-in 

C-ll 
Dr. Morse M-Ol 



Dr. Nanassy C-31 

Staff L-13 

Mrs. Kelly F-IC 



Dr. McElroy G-21 



1 



018 


32 


A445 




023 


32 


A540 


2 


035 


33 


A54I 




036 


33 


A550 




038 


33 


A620 




052 


35 


A564 


2 


053 


35 


A565 




071 


36 


A585 


2 


074 


36 


A654 


1 



SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 151 

Course No. Sec. No. Course Title Instructor BIdg. & Rm. 

Thursday 5:00 P.M. (Continued) 

Puerto Rican Children In Mainland Schools ... Dr. Cordasco C-320 

Social Forces in Education Mrs. Bredenneier . . . G-109 

Supervision II Mr. Cuff G-l 10 

Historic and Philosophic Development of 

Adult-Continuing Education Mr. Ast G-l II 

Systems Analysis in Education Dr. Merlo S-102 

Dynamics of Group Processes Staff G-l 13 

Consultation in Organizational Development . Dr. Gorman G-l 12 

Group Guidance and Counseling Activities . . Staff E-OOl 

Field Work and Practicum in Guidance 

and Counseling Dr. Gelfond G-2 1 6 

075 36 A654 2 Field Work and Practicum in Guidance 

and Counseling Dr. Gregg G-217 

Field Work and Practicum in Social Work Dr. Williams G-306 

The French Novel of the 18th Century Mrs. Sergent G-209 

Seminar in Modernismo Dr. Rivera G-308 

Real Variables II Dr. Chai V-I6I 

Selected Topics in Mathematics Mr. Garfunkel V-154 

Seminar: Emotional Disturbances of Childhood Dr. Duryea E-013 

Urban Psychology Dr. Williams F-104 

Developmental Psychology Staff C-307 

Diagnostic Case Studies Dr. Seymour H-004 

Biological Science Demonstrations Dr. Kuhnen F-210 

Advanced Theoretical Organic Chemistry . . . Mr. Flynn F-204 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Newspaper in the Classroom Mr. Grieco G-308 

Education of the Handicapped Staff K-129 

Merchandise Information Staff C-310 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Marketing Management Staff C-3 I 8 

I (Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature I Staff G-206 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature II Staff G-207 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

19th Century English Romantic Literature .... Dr. McGee G-208 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
129 21 AlOO 2 Fundamentals of Speech Staff A-IOI 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

237 28 A250 Foundations of Industry— Plastics Staff F-223 

241 28 A38I Industrial Power Staff F-l 19 

244 28 A490 Jewelry Making and Lapidary Staff F- II 8 

166 46 AIOOB Beginning Spanish II Staff G-309 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
173 49 AIOOB Beginning Italian II Mr. Battlsta G-307 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
192 50 AlOl Introduction to Modern Mathematics Staff F-105 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
177 63 A475 Oriental Religions Staff G-314 

(Also meets Tuesday) 
300 65 AlOO I General Psychology Staff G-316 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

1303 65 AlOi 2 Human Growth and Development Staff G-3 1 7 

(Also meets Tuesday) 



076 


36 


A655 




164 


41 


A532 




171 


46 


A546 




198 


50 


A522 




204 


50 


A575 




309 


65 


A545 




312 


65 


A553 


2 


320 


65 


A56I 


3 


336 


65 


A590 




179 


81 


A4I0 




182 


82 


A53I 




276 


90 


A4I0 




357 


97 


A586 




fday 


6:30 P.M. 




215 


1 1 


A4I9 




222 


12 


A4I7 




141 


20 


AI05 


3 


145 


20 


A 106 


3 


149 


20 


A346 





152 SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R I N G SEMESTER 



Course No. 



Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



BIdg. & Rm. 



Thursday 6:30 P.M. (Continued) 

186 



265 
272 
280 
285 
286 



,S0 A422 

91 A20I 

93 A200 

94 Alio 
94 AI23 
94 A2I4 



Thursday 7:00 P.M. 

188 84 A506 

Thursday 

151 
155 
229 
015 

026 
029 
044 
056 
062 
069 
081 



7:30 P.M. 

20 A50I 

20 A5I8 

26 A53I 

31 A533 

32 A560 

33 A5I0 

34 A503 

35 A662 

36 A579 

36 A583 

37 A506 



085 37 A560 

091 38 A45I 

202 50 A568 

105 57 A400 

310 65 A550 

317 65 A560 

321 65 A562 

324 65 A564 



329 65 A568 

333 65 A578 

258 73 A528 

183 82 A544 

185 80 A40I 

288 94 A430 

296 95 A403 

352 96 A579 

355 97 A58IB 



Consumer Science 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Physical Anthropology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Cultural Geography 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Development of American Civilization . . 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Contemporary Europe, 1914 to Present . 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Diplomatic History of the United States 

(Also meets Tuesday) 



Advanced Inverebrate Paleontology 
(Also meets Tuesday) 



Anglo-Saxon 

Byron, Shelly, Keats 

Housing the Family 

Curriculum Construction in the 

Secondary School 

Comparative Studies of Educational Systems 

Educational Administration I 

Methods of Research 

Group Development Laboratory II 

The Use of Tests in Counseling 

Educational Guidance 

Reading Resources 



Practicum in Environmental Education 
2 Television Programming Seminar 



Applied Mathematics I 

History of the Cinema as Art 

Quantitative and Statistical Methods 

Advanced Educational Psychology 

Dynamics of Human Behavior 

Psychology and Education of Physically and 

Mentally Handicapped Children 

Psychology of Group Dynamics 

Psychological Tests and Measurements . . . . 

Evaluation in Health 

Electrochemistry 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Teaching Science in Secondary Schools . . . 

Modern Japanese History 

Governments and Politics of the Far East . . 

Community Resources and Youth 

Diagnosis and Correction of Children with 
Learning Disabilities II . 



Dr. S. KowalskI V-259 

Mrs. Tatkon F-106 

Staff C-304 

Staff G-II5 

Staff G-315 

Mr. Bell G-II8 

1 
Mr. Ramsdell B-004 



Dr. Petty G-30^ 

Dr. Schwegel G-20^ 

Mrs. Mukherjee .... F-lOy 

Dr. McElroy G-2li 

Mr. Bernstein G-IO*; 

Dr. Lindemann .... H-00^ 

Staff H-OO: 

Dr. Gorman G-l K 

Dr. Gelfond G-2I< 

Dr. Gregg . G-21' 

Miss Schantz C-107 

C-109 ! 

C-ll 

Staff G-21! 

Mr. Diglio C-I2I 

C-12' 

Dr. Parzynski V-16 

Staff L-13 

Dr. Rotter . .' F-IG- 

Staff E-00 

Staff C-ll 

Dr. Duryea E-OI 

Staff G-ll 

Dr. Shapiro S-IO 

Mr. Shahrokh C-30 

Dr. Ewart F-20. 

Mrs. Filas V-26 

Mr. Olenik G-30 

Mr. Utete G-ll 

Staff G-21 



Staff 



K-12 



SCHEDULE OF C L A S S E S - S P R 1 N G SEMESTER 



153 



Course No. Sec. No. 



Course Title 



Instructor 



Bldg. & Rm. 



hursday 8:00 P.M. 

220 12 A208 

223 12 A4I7 

225 12 A457 

142 20 AI05 

146 20 AI06 

150 20 A375 

167 46 A200B 

174 49 A200B 

301 65 AlOO 

304 65 A200 

187 84 AlOO 

273 93 A4I0 

281 94 Alio 

283 94 AII2 

346 96 AlOO 

turday 8:30 A.M. 

010 31 A530 

037 33 A6I9 



049 34 A578 
Wi 277 90 A40I 



irday 10:30 P.M. 

154 20 A5IIB 
016 31 A635 
045 34 A503 
278 90 A603 



Salesmanship 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Marketing Management 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Sales Management 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature I 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Composition and Literature II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Film and Society 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Intermediate Spanish II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Intermediate Italian II 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

General Psychology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Educational Psychology 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Fundamentals of Geoscience 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Urban Geography 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Development of American Civilization 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

Selected Topics in American History Since 1876 

(Also meets Tuesday) 

The Sociological Perspective 

(Also meets Tuesday) 



Staff C-310 

Staff C-318 

Staff C-320 

Staff G-206 

Staff G-207 

Mr. Price G-l 13 

Staff G-309 

Staff G-307 

Staff G-316 

Staff G-317 

Mr. Kelland V-258 

Staff C-304 

Staff G-l 15 

Staff G-l 18 

Staff G-314 



1 Principles of Curriculum Development Mr. Salt G-109 

Seminar in Administration: Mr. Salt and 

Supervision and Curriculum Dr. Peckham G-l 10 

2 Testing and Evaluation Staff H-003 

The Teaching of the Social Studies in 

Secondary Schools Staff C-307 

Literary Criticism from 1800 to the Present ... Dr. Hanson G-209 

Research Seminar in Curriculum Construction Mr. Salt G-109 

5 Methods of Research Staff H-003 

Reading Seminar in History and the 

Social Sciences Staff C-3 I 



NOTES 



NOTES 






NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



NOTES 



PARKING AND TRAFFIC REGULATIONS 

A. PURCHASE OF PARKING DECALS 

1. During the process of registration, students who intend to park on campus will be required to fill out a 
vehicle registration form. At that time appropriate decals may be purchased. The charge will be $10.00 
for decals purchased in the Fall or Spring (valid for Fall, Spring, and Summer) and $5.00 for decals pur- 
chased in the Summer (valid for Summer only). 

2. All decals are based on a one-year period beginning September 1, and terminating August 31. Traffic and 
Parking Regulations are in effect 24 hours a day. 

3. Students who wish to drive mo-e than one auto may obtain a second decal. The second and any additional 
decal may be purchased for $1.00 but the student must register both autos under his name and under no 
condition may both vehicles be parked on the campus at the same time. Non-compliance with these con- 
ditions will constitute a violation and will be subject to fine according to the regulations below. 

B. PURCHASE OF DECALS 

1. Requests for decals will be honored only upon the presentation of accurate information about the license 
number, description and ownership of the vehicle. 

2. Decals are not transferable and must be removed in the event of: 

a. Change of ownership. 

b. Termination of association with the college. 

0. Termination of authorized period for which decal was issued. 

3. An appropriate decal shall be displayed on the left rear, side window of all student vehicles on or before 
the first day of classes each term. 

C. PARKING REGULATIONS 

Failure to observe any of the following regulations shall constitute a violation which will be processed 
according to the provisions under "VIOLATIONS". 

1. Autos must properly display a current decal only. (Decals must be affixed according to the instructions 
on the back of the decal.) 

2. Autos must be parked in observance of the following zones: 

a. Faculty parking only (posted signs and/or large "F" stenciled on pavement) for cars displaying faculty 
and staff decals (effective 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.). 

b. Visitor parking only (posted). A visitor is considered to be a person who is not employed by the 
college or registered with the college. 

c. Regular parking (unmarked spaces) for cars displaying appropriate decals as described above. 

3. Autos parked under any of the following conditions are subject to a fine according to provisions under 
"VIOLATIONS". 

a. In "No Parking" areas which are posted or marked on the curbing. 

b. On lawns cultivated grass areas. 

c. In front of or obstructing driveways, crosswalks or delivery areas. 

d. Within the regular parking areas but in such a way as to impede traffic. 

e. Over or on the lines of the designated parking spaces. 
Regulations pertaining to moving violations: 

a. Exceeding the posted speed limit of 15 miles per hour. 

b. Failure to observe stop signs. 

4. Overnight parking is not permitted. Any exception to this rule must be requested through the Traffic 
Coordinator's office. 

5. In case of snow storms all personnel at the College must remove their cars from the Campus so that 
efficient snow removal may be affected. 

6. Accidents: A report of all accidents involving motor vehicles on college property is to be sent to the 
Traffic Coordinator at the earliest possible moment. 

7. Illegally parked vehicles without decals belonging to friends or relatives of students will automatically 
make students responsible for their tickets amounting to three or more. 

D. VIOLATIONS 

Any infractions of the regulations as contained herein will constitute a violation and will be disposed of 
as follows: 

1. A sum of $5.00 payable at the Traffic Coordinator's Office will be charged for each violation. 

2. More than five infractions will jeopardize the students standing with the college. 

3. Students may appeal violations to the Student Appeal Board. 

4. Montclair State College will withhold the grades and/or deny registration to any student who has failed 
to dispose of outstanding violations. 

5. "Violators of parking regulations will be subject to towing and removal of their automobiles